Pelican 2010 Recoil LED glue for led

desert.snake

Flashlight Enthusiast
CPF Supporter
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
1,284
Location
Eastern Europe
Hello, my friend and I decided to change Seoul to something more modern. The diode rises easily, soldering wires to the loop is also not very difficult, but there was a problem with reliability. The diode board is essentially held only by the tension of the wires. If you hit the flashlight sideways hard, then the board moves from the landing site and I'm afraid that then the diode may overheat during prolonged operation. What kind of strong heat transfer adhesives can be?

So far, measurements on a 3xC battery are:
XPG2 shaved
4.3 V
0.27 A
lux on 3 m range = ~ 22 level HDS 220 lm SST20

IMG-5689.jpg


IMG-5690.jpg


IMG-5694.jpg


IMG-5697.jpg


IMG-5698.jpg


IMG-5699.jpg


IMG-5701.jpg



or maybe it makes sense to tie it with insulated wire to an aluminum cooling structure in the same way you tie wooden telegraph poles to a concrete base?

0s.png
 

Lynx_Arc

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 1, 2004
Messages
10,937
Location
Tulsa,OK
If the LED doesn't need to be contacting the base electrically they make glue that is heat conducting for LEDs. I used some on one and it works fine.
 

desert.snake

Flashlight Enthusiast
CPF Supporter
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
1,284
Location
Eastern Europe
This base for heat dissipation is anodized and there is no additional electrical contact, any type of adhesive can be used, even electrically conductive. What brand of glue did you use? The ones I found in local stores have pretty bad reviews on the internet :(
 

datiLED

Flashlight Enthusiast
CPF Supporter
Joined
May 9, 2006
Messages
2,004
Location
Atlanta, GA
I use 30 minute epoxy with ultra fine mesh aluminum oxide, mixed at a 1:1 ratio. Basically, home made Arctic Alumina adhesive. It ends up being much stronger than the AA, because it flows better and sets up slowly.
 

DIWdiver

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
2,706
Location
Connecticut, USA
If you've had success with the setup you have, then you don't need a really good thermal adhesive. What you need is a really thin layer of an okay adhesive, or a thicker layer of a better compound. I'm guessing the latter is what you've been using. Get something cheap, apply some pressure while it cures, and you should be good.

As I recall, the Recoil has a rather poor heatsink. Spending good money for a great adhesive would be like putting $5000 tires on a Yugo. In theory it should improve performance. In practice, you wouldn't get your money's worth.

Oh, and unless you are impeccably clean and careful, I would never count on anodizing for electrical insulation. The tiniest crack, scratch, or pit could render the insulation useless. Type III hard anodizing is WAY better than type I or type II, but much more expensive. It's often claimed and not delivered by low-end suppliers.

In the Recoil I think there's no way for the heatsink to be involved in an electrical circuit, so it probably doesn't matter if the heatsink is insulated from the LED, as long as it doesn't short the leads of the LED. So anodized, not anodized, conductive or non-conductive adhesive, probably none of it matters as long as you don't short the LED leads.
 

desert.snake

Flashlight Enthusiast
CPF Supporter
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
1,284
Location
Eastern Europe
I use 30 minute epoxy with ultra fine mesh aluminum oxide, mixed at a 1:1 ratio. Basically, home made Arctic Alumina adhesive. It ends up being much stronger than the AA, because it flows better and sets up slowly.
Thanks, I will definitely try!

Oh, and unless you are impeccably clean and careful, I would never count on anodizing for electrical insulation. The tiniest crack, scratch, or pit could render the insulation useless. Type III hard anodizing is WAY better than type I or type II, but much more expensive. It's often claimed and not delivered by low-end suppliers.

In the Recoil I think there's no way for the heatsink to be involved in an electrical circuit, so it probably doesn't matter if the heatsink is insulated from the LED, as long as it doesn't short the leads of the LED. So anodized, not anodized, conductive or non-conductive adhesive, probably none of it matters as long as you don't short the LED leads.

The radiator is not involved in the electrical circuit, it does not matter. I need a strong heat-conducting glue so that the diode does not come off the radiator in a side impact.
 
Top