Please Help I put Dielectric Grease on My Fenix L0DCE

bullpup

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Was this a mistake? Should I take it off? Will it be OK? I am worried that this flashlight might not like this gease.
 

Flash_Gordon

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Dielectric means non-conducting. Probably no place for this on a flashlight since most lights use the body threads for a conducting path.

Mark
 

gunga

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I used super lube on all my lights. While it is non-conducting, it does not seem to cause any issues.

If you are worried, keep the grease away from the top of the battery tube, the circuit is completed when that contacts the circuit board in the head.

I had read about having grease on the contact surface to reduce breakdownof the aluminum. The theory is reasonable, and it doesn't hurt the light or seem to affect the circuit so I just have grease all over.
 

LightScene

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Dielectric is what you want. It doesn't conduct, so it won't create any shorts. It does not prevent conduction between contact surfaces.
 

FlashKat

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Dielectric grease is conductive since it is used on battery connections, spark plug wiring, etc. There should not be a problem unles it swells up your o-rings. It helps prevent corrosion.
Flash_Gordon said:
Dielectric means non-conducting. Probably no place for this on a flashlight since most lights use the body threads for a conducting path.

Mark
 

Steve L

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I have a LODCE and a L2DCE, I use Dielectric silcone grease on them with no problems. It is what is used on electrical connections. The metal is conducting the electricty, the grease is lubricating the threads and o-rings.
 
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Minjin

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FlashKat said:
Dielectric grease is conductive since it is used on battery connections, spark plug wiring, etc. There should not be a problem unles it swells up your o-rings. It helps prevent corrosion.

It is NOT conductive. Thats what dielectric means. Where there is a metal to metal interface, the grease is pushed out of the way. You grease these contacts so that they are always protected from the elements. Every spot other than the actual contact is still coated.

Conducting grease has too much potential for disaster.
 

Nake

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Correct it is non-conductive. It is used on spark plugs, electrical connections, etc. to insulate them.
 

FlashKat

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Okay...I am wrong as it is non conductive, but it is not a true insulating grease where it still works when applied to flashlights. I was thinking something different since I do use it on my car battery terminals. I like this stuff.
Minjin said:
It is NOT conductive. Thats what dielectric means. Where there is a metal to metal interface, the grease is pushed out of the way. You grease these contacts so that they are always protected from the elements. Every spot other than the actual contact is still coated.

Conducting grease has too much potential for disaster.
 

Minjin

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FlashKat said:
Okay...I am wrong as it is non conductive, but it is not a true insulating grease where it still works when applied to flashlights. I was thinking something different since I do use it on my car battery terminals. I like this stuff.

You're still not getting it. Get some hair gel or something gelly. Put a little swirl on your index finger. Now bring your index finger and thumb together in a pinching motion. Squeeze down all the way. Your fingers are now touching. The gel/grease has been pressed out of the way. If you could press down hard enough, when you pull your fingers apart, there would be no grease between them. The same exact thing happens with spark plug terminals, electrical connections, and yes, your flashlight threads.

It IS insulating in that it does NOT conduct electricity.
 

FlashKat

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Okay...Then apply a heavy layer of it on your hands then grab the hot and ground of a 120 volt wire and let me know how well you were insulated.
Minjin said:
You're still not getting it. Get some hair gel or something gelly. Put a little swirl on your index finger. Now bring your index finger and thumb together in a pinching motion. Squeeze down all the way. Your fingers are now touching. The gel/grease has been pressed out of the way. If you could press down hard enough, when you pull your fingers apart, there would be no grease between them. The same exact thing happens with spark plug terminals, electrical connections, and yes, your flashlight threads.

It IS insulating in that it does NOT conduct electricity.
 
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The most imminent threat of using a wrong lubricant with flashlights is damage to O-ring/rubber parts.

Not much else to worry about.
 

65535

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Dear God, dielectric grease is non conductive, it is used on car electronics exposed to water (contaminated conductive water) in order to keep it from cuasing severe corrosion. It is fine on flashlight threads for the exact same reason it works on other electronical connections, the mechanical pressure applied by the mating parts forces the lubricant to squeeze into areas of lower pressure.
 

jayflash

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Yes, clean the threads and then reapply some, silicone (or suitable alternative) dielectric (spark plug), grease. It'll protect exposed metal and o-rings and still allow electricity to flow when the switch (tail cap, head, whatever) is activated.
 
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