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Removing the Clip

Joined
Nov 28, 2003
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8,371
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Kansas City, MO
As a die-hard McGizmo afficiando, I truly believe one can never have too many. However, I like 'em clipless. Just never been a fan of clips. Even though McGizmo's clip design is the best of any light, I just can't have 'em. :D

Therefore, I usually remove them. Now, as you all know, the McGizmo Ti clips are attached to the packs by two round head Ti screws. If you strip 'em, you've got some work ahead of you. I speak from experience. Because they're situated side by side, and because they're round-headed, they are virtually impossible to remove, or even grab onto for that matter. So, if you're like me and want to remove the clip, here's what you need to do.

First, try to unscrew them the traditional way. I am pretty sure the bit size is 1/16. UPDATE: Use Thorp 1/16" (See Don's note, below, post #3). If you strip them, which is entirely possible, you will need to do the following: get a small square file and carefully file flat surfaces into opposite sides of each screw. Be extra careful to not let the file touch the body itself - just file the screw heads against the clip (I didn't care if I ruined the screws or the clip, of course). Once you have two filed flats grooved into each screw you can then get a grip, so to speak, on the screw head with your small pliers and slowly turn each one out. It definitely works, but it takes time and patience.

The great thing about all this is that, although you max out a pair of screws and a clip, you keep the body perfect so that, if you lose all semblance of sanity down the road and actually want to add a clip, you still can. :D :nana:

Just a little tidbit from a McGizmo geek. Thanks for reading. :grin2: :nana:
 
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McGizmo

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There have been a number of threads now on the utility of the Thorp 1/16" hex drivers and they are almost a must for these Ti clip screws. I am sorry that typical 1/16" hex wrenches don't cut the mustard here but that's just the way it is. :shrug:
 
Joined
Nov 28, 2003
Messages
8,371
Location
Kansas City, MO
There have been a number of threads now on the utility of the Thorp 1/16" hex drivers and they are almost a must for these Ti clip screws. I am sorry that typical 1/16" hex wrenches don't cut the mustard here but that's just the way it is. :shrug:

Ah! Therein lies my problem. Thanks Don! That sounds a whole lot easier than the way I was doing it. :D Well, at least there's a solution for those who "screw" up like I did. :D
 

Th232

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Dec 25, 2008
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Sydney, Australia
There have been a number of threads now on the utility of the Thorp 1/16" hex drivers and they are almost a must for these Ti clip screws. I am sorry that typical 1/16" hex wrenches don't cut the mustard here but that's just the way it is. :shrug:

Will also have to remember that, after my first attempt.:eek:
 

Henk_Lu

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Oct 31, 2007
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Golden Cage
Reading this reminded me checking if the screws on my BB Haiku were tight, because the clip wasn't well aligned.

Silly me... :ohgeez:
 

Dog Chaser

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Sep 26, 2006
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On the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay
Troy,

I remember going through this same ritual. I used a dremel tool and one of those cutting discs to make my flat sides instead of a file. It worked pretty well, but it's almost impossible not to knick the clip in the process. I also remember buying the Thorp 1/16" driver soon after! I keep my clips on the one cell bodies, but have removed them on a couple of my two cells.
 
Joined
Nov 28, 2003
Messages
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Location
Kansas City, MO
Troy,

I remember going through this same ritual. I used a dremel tool and one of those cutting discs to make my flat sides instead of a file. It worked pretty well, but it's almost impossible not to knick the clip in the process. I also remember buying the Thorp 1/16" driver soon after! I keep my clips on the one cell bodies, but have removed them on a couple of my two cells.

Glad to know I'm not alone. :) A Dremel - now that would be a great tool to have. I've got to get one. :thumbsup:
 

TranquillityBase

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jun 12, 2005
Messages
3,741
Copper anti-seize compound is a welcome addition to the "garage supplies", so to speak. Most "good" hardware stores should carry a high quality copper anti-seize compound, and Bondhus brand hex keys (sold individually, and in sets).

If you can successfully crack the screws loose, you're home free. Generously coat the screws with the copper anti-seize, and work them in and out, (carefully tightening them until you hear the first snap/creak, then loosen again), this is a process, and it will take some time. Make sure the hex key is fully engaged and dead straight in the broach. After the process is completed, you will be able to remove and replace the clip without fear of the dreaded gall.

When the process is completed, remove all excess anti-seize compound, as it's very difficult, if not impossible to remove from clothing.
 

souptree

Flashlight Enthusiast
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Dec 24, 2005
Messages
1,175
A group buy on the Thorp drivers would be a welcome project if anyone wanted to take it on.... :poke: :candle:
 

Braddah_Bill

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587
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Hawaii
Glad to know I'm not alone. :) A Dremel - now that would be a great tool to have. I've got to get one. :thumbsup:

dad, a Dremel is a must have, get one.

I just removed the clip from my Bare AL PD (you remember that one, still have it, still love it) to polish it and the clip went right back on. I'll have to get one of those Thorp 1/16" drivers soon.
 

darkzero

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Oct 7, 2003
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To add, any quality hex driver from your local R/C hobby shop will work fine, preferaby the type with machined tips just as the Thorp driver is. I use a Dynamite driver which has a machined HSS hex tip & is also replaceable. BTW, the Thorp driver is made by MIP which is very well known in the R/C car industry. When you need a high quality tool or hardware for smaller items, turn to the R/C car tools & hardware. They're designed to have tight tolerances & take a beating. For example the Ti screws.

I've worked on lights that seemed to have stripped screws but when I used the Dynamite driver I was still able to get the screws off. It's pretty akward seeing white sparks fry when trying to use a standard L shaped hex wrench when it slips/strips. :laughing:

When all else fails, use a Dremel. Cut a slot & use a flat head screw driver to unscrew it. Only had to do that once, no damage to the clip or light if your handy with a Dremel.

Another trick when removing the Ti clip screws, if the one your trying to unsrew just doesn't seem to budge & feels like it's about to strip, stop & try the other. Lots of times the curvature of the clips is adding resistance to the screws. It helps when you first unscrew the screw that was installed last. So when you put your clip back on, remember which screw you installed last & start with that one the next time you need to take it off again.
 
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fyrstormer

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Jul 24, 2009
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Don, have you tried using Torx screws instead? They're probably harder to find, but impossible to strip. In fact, I've used Torx bits on hex screws before because the way the Torx bit puts pressure on the hex head causes it to deforn in a more usable way, instead of just rounding-off and stripping.
 

McGizmo

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fyrstormer,

Yes, I used some torx stainless screws a few years back. I agree on them being a nice drive design provided you have the appropriate driver and don't mistake them for hex. It is all moot though because I want Ti screws and the hex is what I can get from LunsfordRacing. I have had no problem with the hex screws and a good driver, like the Thorp.

You say that the torx might be harder to find. I would guess that might be an understatement but it's just a guess because I am not looking for them. I have a very satisfactory relationship with Lunsford and hope it continues.
 

Cuso

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May 18, 2006
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Florida
The Thorp 1/16 McGizmo approved :thumbsup:

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