Rigid DOT selective yellow Fog Lamps

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-Virgil-

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SAE J583 contains two fog lamp specifications. The old "F" specification and the newer "F3" specification which requires much higher performance in terms of light output and distribution as well as control of glare and stray light. So my first question would be to ask which part of J583 they're talking about when they say the lamps are "SAE J583 compliant".
 

Alaric Darconville

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The image says the white ones are "great for both on-road and off-road use"; the yellow ones are "great for adverse conditions such as Dust, Fog, Rain, or Snow". Really, EITHER ONE should be great for "adverse conditions" if they produce a real fog beam pattern (although the yellow ones would still be better). It's almost like they are encouraging the use of the white fog lamps in the *absence* of those adverse conditions.

The lamps are mounted a bit high in some of the example pictures. It doesn't appear they're mounted behind the grille, but one pair of them is mounted above the lower-positioned low beam (and above the lower-positioned high beam) of that Ford. (How many fog lamps do they NEED on that Ford, anyway?)
 

John_Galt

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So someone at rigid discovered duplicolor metalcast anodize yellow spray paint. They'll charge an arm and a leg for this "innovation, I'm sure.

So my first question would be to ask which part of J583 they're talking about when they say the lamps are "SAE J583 compliant".

I would highly doubt they meet the f3 requirements (#just-saying).
 
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Alaric Darconville

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So someone at rigid discovered duplicolor metalcast anodize yellow spray paint. They'll charge an arm and a leg for this "innovation, I'm sure.
More likely the color is directly infused in the lens material. The paint application would quickly wear away on a moving vehicle exposed to road grit and weather. If it were a paint application, they would surely then apply a hardcoat over it to protect it. But yellow lens material would be much more economical than multiple spray sessions, particularly if the color also needed a separate UV crosslinking session.

As far as beleaguering the "innovation", it surely is refreshing that LED fog lamps are emitting selective yellow, not 6000K+ CCT white light.
 
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Magio

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I wonder whether the beam on these is the same as the fogLights they make for the Tacoma
 

Sadden

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I wonder what the CCT and CRI of the base emmiters are. The loss if they are starting with 6000k leds would be quite large.
 

Mr. Merk

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How come? Have you (has anyone) picked up the telephone or sent them an email and asked them?

Virgil, you are someone that really knows what they're talking about and also knows which questions need to be asked. I'd appreciate it if you inquired on our behalf.
 

-Virgil-

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Done, and done. Just got off the phone with them. White and yellow they're all "F", and both colors of lamp use the same emitters; only the lens color is different.
 

-Virgil-

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CCT is 5800K. Their response when I asked about CRI was "CRI?". After awhile on hold, they said "Sorry, don't have that information". Not surprising; nobody ever asks about that. Assume it's going to be typical of white automotive LEDs, that is around 80 at best.

They didn't ask me, but I would rather see them using selective yellow LEDs that produce next to zero blue light (yes, they really exist) instead of using colored plastic to filter out the huge amount of blue light put out by ~6000K white LEDs.
 

Boghog1

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Re: Rigid DOT selective yellow eFog Lamps

So someone at rigid discovered duplicolor metalcast anodize yellow spray paint. They'll charge an arm and a leg for this "innovation, I'm sure.

I read the Daniel Stern article, do you think the duplicolor is a better choice over the tape?
 
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Sadden

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Yeah those things will have very little output left after filtering. Such a shame, they were like halfway too making a decent product.
 

John_Galt

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Virgil, the info you were given is supported by statements made in this thread I came across. I dont like to talk out of my @ss very often, but the performance promised by companies like rigid/x-vision/similar makes me roll my eyes.


https://www.reddit.com/r/Lightbar/comments/abwgm8/im_an_rsm_for_rigid_industries_ask_me_anything/

57/5800k, 70-ish CRI LEDs "for best simulating natural daylight" (queue Eyeroll and groans from the orchestral pit).

Also not surprised by the J583-F requirement being the one that is met.

@Alaric, you are most likely correct, but I had a good experience with duplicolor metalcast with no topcoat over both glass and polycarbonate lens material for over a year. No loss of (apparent) clarity or change of color, and no chipping or flaking from road debris or manual lens clearing with an ice scraper over a winter. A third option is some sort of filter they fit over the lens, like a layer or two of kapton tape. The spray on topcoat and/or applied filter would also reduce the number of lenses they purchase.
 

Alaric Darconville

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57/5800k, 70-ish CRI LEDs "for best simulating natural daylight" (queue Eyeroll and groans from the orchestral pit).
Yep, while natural daylight can be in the 5700-5800K range in certain circumstances, the CRI will be, if not 100, asymptotic to 100.
Those specs they give sound like some terrible "cool white" fluorescent lamp.
 

John_Galt

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Yep. It's 2019. There are a plethora of reasonably efficient mid to high Cri LED options that can handle being driven hard. Their marketing department is running the rest of the company...

If anything, they could set themsekves apart from the competition by offering neutral white high CRI lighting. I dont see it happening though.
 
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