Sebenza or RSK Mk1

cy

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don't know about RSK, but there is just something about how solid and precise sebbie is. it's not a new design but a tried and proven one. where all possible angles have been worked out.

As with ARC AAA, it's not the best at any one thing, but the best compromise of a lot of features.

I use mine for ANY job that requires a knife. no babying this blade. like my CR2/Li14430, sm sebbie is always on my person.
 

cy

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since I prefer a medium sized knife to EDC. I went with a small sebbie.

small is relative, consider small sebbie to be a medium sized knife. compared to small knives like sypderco dragonfly.

I saw atrickpay's large sebbie and decided that was not for me.

here's a size comp small sebbie next to U2

sebbie u2.JPG
 

KC2IXE

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I'd probably buy the small "grey turd" (used affectionately) - nice knives. It will probably be the next "Non gift, non custom" I buy. Of course I really want a wood inlay Sebbie, with dual studs - which is why I keep buying customs - as they cost in the same price range, and I can get knifes that _I_ like better. The "Plain" small sebbie is one heck of a knife however
 

Deanster

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Hiya T_i_N!

I recently bought a RSK Mk1, and it's a great knife in many ways - nice feel, nice weight, cuts great. However, it's chubby. Real chubby. The rounded handle is very thick, and takes up LOTS of space in my pocket (riding on its clip).

It's thick enough that my pocket grazes doorways and tables when I've got it there, and the paint on the clip is worn off from rubbing on things.

As you know, one of my favorite things about the Sebenza is how flat and thin it is in the pocket - the RSK is kind of the opposite of that approach.

So, the RSK has moved to my car as an 'emergency' knife, and lives in the center console, where its fat body bothers no one. The Sebenza (small regular) still lives in my pocket.

The difference is profound enough for me that I think you'd be better off with a Large Sebenza than a mini- RSK, in terms of flat ride.

Finally, the very aggresive knurling of the RSK feels very rough, almost biting in my hand, especially on the spine of the handle - not very comfortable to use for extended periods.
 

Steve Andrews

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I have both, but prefer the RSK.
I find it feels better in the hand. My Seb never gets carried any more, not because I don't want to scratch it up - it already is - but because I prefer the RSK.
Oh.. and the Benchmade is cheaper too.
 

newo

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I rotate EDCs between 2 large Sebbies, 2 small Sebbies, and 2 Mnandis. The Sebbies are regulars, not classics, but I'm an admitted a**ho** about this, so the Sebbies are all either unique graphics, or limited edition woodies. One of each, in each size. The Mnandis are all wood inlaid 'cuz my bride seized my mammoth tusk inlay as her own. I thought of it as a tax, and a bribe, rolled into one.

Which size I carry on any given day depends upon what I'm wearing, and what I think I'll be doing.

On the Mnandis, and the unique graphics, I've removed the clips, and installed those little substitute plugs that CRK sells. Makes for a smaller, thinner profile in the pocket. On the woodies, I've left the clip on because it balances out the inlay on the back side.

Do I actually use these tarted up knives? You betcha! They are very sturdy, and they can take it. Or maybe I'm not that tough on them. Anyway, life is too short to drink cheap wine, or to compromise on one's toys!

On edit - the substitute plugs are only on the Sebbies. There is no substitute plug for a Mnandi, and the only hole left behind is a very small pilot-type alignment hole.
 

LEDmodMan

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Ray,
One other thing to throw out for you to think about. BM introduced the 635 Mini Skirmish at the recent SHOT show. It's basically just a 630 Skirmish sized down to allow it to be legally carried in most US places (since the 630 is over 4", it is illegal to carry in several states).

Here's a picture of it, courtesy of Doug Ritter's SHOT show review:

bm_miniskirmish.jpg


The buzz is that the 635 is going to be a real competitor to the Sebenza line, *especially* if fit/finish are executed as well as they were on the 630. It is due out later this Spring, IIRC. It is only slightly smaller than the large sebenza, but at 1/2 to nearly 1/3 the price. Still the great S30V steel as in both of the other knives you mention.

Also, the 635 will have very nearly the exact same blade size and overall length of the Benchmade RSK MkI, however with a thinner body the Ti handle affords, opening holes instead of studs, and a framelock like the Sebenza.

If you ask me, in general the 635 is nicer to look at than a plain Sebenza is, plus the 635 begs to be modded whereas I doubt I could ever lay a cutting tool to a Sebenza. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/icon15.gif However, I do like the blade shape of the Sebenza slightly better for a knife of that size.

PS - Maybe I should say this now. If you buy a 635 and aren't happy with it, contact me before putting it up for sale on B/S/T. I'll probably buy it from you. I EDC both the RSK MkI and the 943 I bought from you (along with a 630 at times). I would love to add a 635 to the mix. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

phatch

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Dec 30, 2003
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The Sebenza is just about everything I dislike in a knife. Frame lock, metal handle and hollow ground.

The RSK has the awesome axis lock, a beefy handle that is comfortable. Operates easily with winter gloves, at least I thought so. The checkering wears in nicely. And a nice high flat grind.

Phil
 

rnpollard

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Sebenza!! Small regular with an Arc AAA on the lanyard for everyday. Large Regular with double thumb lug and swedge for weekends and evenings. Unbeatable!
 

Carpe Diem

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Hi Ray...

I vote for the small plain Sebenza. It`s built like a tank, and has a beautiful combination of form and function.

It`s also meant to be used, and not become a safe queen. Different flashlights may rotate in and out of my EDC, but I ALWAYS carry my small plain Sebenza. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Take care.

/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

this_is_nascar

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Thanks guys. I've owned a small Sebby a couple different times in the past. I don't recall why I sold them, but it's not unlike me to go back to something I didn't care for the 1st time around to give it another try. I also had a couple Mk1's. The price is great, but it is a pretty big (thick) knife. I recall the Sebby (small) being much thinner but I don't think that I cared for the clip and the handle didn't feel as good as the Benchmade in my hand.
 

newo

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Get one with wood inlays. The classics cost less with inlays because they aren't limited editions. But the inlays do thicken the handle up a bit, if you are looking for that. The clip comes off. And if the indent where the clip was attached bothers you, CRK sells an insert (at a ridiculous price, I might add), a piece of Ti that fits perfectly into that indent. That sort of thing (the indent from the missing clip) bothers me a lot, so I bought the insert. They don't sell many inserts, so they're made in small runs, so they cost too much for what they are. But they are available if it makes a difference to you.
 

Ginseng

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For ergonomics and use, the RSK or Mini-RSK (and to a lesser degree the Grip and MiniGrip) are unbeatable and unbeatable values. I've used both and my take is this: The Sebenza is a beautiful, minimalist knife that happens to work well in lighter applications. The RSK is a knife designed to work and work hard and garners respect by its exceptional integration of form and function.

If I had to cut down a stack of heavy boxes, trim carpet, notch dowels for garden work, etc. there's no doubt that I would rather have the RSK in hand. And need I even mention the AXIS lock? I can deploy, cut and stow the blade in under 1.5 seconds one handed. For me, it's a question of how confident I feel with knife in hand carrying out the operation I'm engaged in. The RSK and Mini-RSK allow me to feel more confident and to focus on the work at hand.

I love this knife design. can you tell? /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Note: This is my opinion so please, no flaming. I'm not looking to dis or debate, just offering my $0.02 in response to Ray's inquiry.

Wilkey
 

js

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[ QUOTE ]
Ginseng said:
For ergonomics and use, the RSK or Mini-RSK (and to a lesser degree the Grip and MiniGrip) are unbeatable and unbeatable values. I've used both and my take is this: The Sebenza is a beautiful, minimalist knife that happens to work well in lighter applications. The RSK is a knife designed to work and work hard and garners respect by its exceptional integration of form and function.

If I had to cut down a stack of heavy boxes, trim carpet, notch dowels for garden work, etc. there's no doubt that I would rather have the RSK in hand. And need I even mention the AXIS lock? I can deploy, cut and stow the blade in under 1.5 seconds one handed. For me, it's a question of how confident I feel with knife in hand carrying out the operation I'm engaged in. The RSK and Mini-RSK allow me to feel more confident and to focus on the work at hand.

I love this knife design. can you tell? /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Note: This is my opinion so please, no flaming. I'm not looking to dis or debate, just offering my $0.02 in response to Ray's inquiry.

Wilkey

[/ QUOTE ]

Hey Wilkey,

Have you ever carried a Sebbie for any length of time? Because I would say that the Sebbie can handle a lot more than "light" work, and I can deploy, cut, and stow the Sebbie very quickly--not sure if it's 1.5 seconds or what.

I have never handled an RSK so I can't say which I would prefer for any given task, but I can tell you that my Sebbie will handle the most rugged of tasks with aplomb and is a knife that is designed to work and work hard. In fact the very name means "work". The lock-up of the Sebbie is compared to the AXIS lock. Both are considered exceptionally solid and safe lock-up systems.

I doubt I could feel any more confident with another knife than I do with my Sebbie, but it is a theoretical possibility.

I also am just throwing out an opinion and do not want to start a flame war, but it just seemed to me that the very things you are praising the RSK for are the very things I would praise the Sebbie for, and it made me wonder if you have done a direct comparison or not.
 

Deanster

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"...that happens to work well in lighter applications."

There's a phrase that'll make Sebenza owners go nuts.

Don't get me wrong, I like the RSK a lot, and wouldn't hesitate to choose or use it for any application you care to name. I have not a bad word to say about mine, and many many good words.

However, the suggestion that the Sebenza is in some way deficient relative to the RSK for heavy use just seems wildly misguided. 'nuff said.

I think the biggest functional difference between the two is that the RSK has a large, grip-filling handle, and the Sebenza has a flat, minimalist handle. It may be that for various applications, one or the other fits an owner's preferences better - for me, the thin profile of the Sebenza makes me MUCH more likely to have it with me, and I find the very aggressive knurling on the RSK a bit much - it's a bit hard on the hands when doing heavy work.

T_i_N - specifically asked for comparison without regard to cost, but that's actually a big deal in this head-to-head. The RSK was designed by Ritter and Benchmade to provide a lower-cost, full-function alternative to his Large Sebenza. I think they did a great job of this, and have offered a knife that is as functional as the Sebenza at 1/3 the price. It's the first knife I've ever felt that way about since I got my Sebenza in 1997. Most others seem to have a less-useful blade shape, lacked strength, etc.

Head-to-head without cost, I think it's a toss-up - purely a matter of preference. With cost included, the RSK is a huge price-performance winner, IMHO.
 

daloosh

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Hey Ray,

I think you've already identified the issues around this choice. I love the Axis lock, and the BM is more ergonomic and comfortable over the long run. But, my EDC is a small Sebenza. It's tough and elegant and comes apart so beautifully. I removed the clip and like the low flat profile for EDC. But, you'll know which fits your needs better.

daloosh
 

js

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Just one more thing:

The ability to completely disassemble and clean my Sebenza is a HUGE plus for me. I love it, and for me it is worth so much. But that's just me. YMMV.
 
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