So I used this Silicone Compound instead of Nyogel...

nvfenixt1

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And now my Flashlights feels gritty when twisting them (one has aluminum threads and the other stainless steel). The product I used is is made by AGS and labeled "Dielectric Silicone Compound for electronic systems". The product itself looks like the pictures of Nyogel I've seen and has the same basic description. Why would this stuff cause the threads to feel gritty? I first cleaned the threads thoroughly with rubbing alcohol and allowed them to dry completely. And evenly applied the grease with a clean brush. Did I do something wrong, or do I just need to buy Nyogel. Thanks for any advice you can offer.
 

lebox97

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you do NOT want to use dielectric materials on flashlight components!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dielectric
insulating stuff like this is typically used on high power systems like automotive ignitions etc where you DON'T want arcing electronics producing radio and other noises.

you want conductivity not insulation on your flashlight components...
try progold/deoxIT if you want to see an increase in output.
in conjunction with the above I use a very small tiny amount of a teflon-silicone lube on O-rings.

:welcome:


And now my Flashlights feels gritty when twisting them (one has aluminum threads and the other stainless steel). The product I used is is made by AGS and labeled "Dielectric Silicone Compound for electronic systems". The product itself looks like the pictures of Nyogel I've seen and has the same basic description. Why would this stuff cause the threads to feel gritty? I first cleaned the threads thoroughly with rubbing alcohol and allowed them to dry completely. And evenly applied the grease with a clean brush. Did I do something wrong, or do I just need to buy Nyogel. Thanks for any advice you can offer.
 

jzmtl

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you do NOT want to use dielectric materials on flashlight components!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dielectric
insulating stuff like this is typically used on high power systems like automotive ignitions etc where you DON'T want arcing electronics producing radio and other noises.

I've been using it for years without problem, any contacting surfaces such as thread on flashlight would simply displace it.
 

nvfenixt1

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you do NOT want to use dielectric materials on flashlight components!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dielectric
insulating stuff like this is typically used on high power systems like automotive ignitions etc where you DON'T want arcing electronics producing radio and other noises.

you want conductivity not insulation on your flashlight components...
try progold/deoxIT if you want to see an increase in output.
in conjunction with the above I use a very small tiny amount of a teflon-silicone lube on O-rings.

:welcome:
Thanks for the welcome and the reply.... Nyogel is a dielectric... Don't most of the flashlight folks use that on their lights?

"teflon-silicone lube on O-rings"... Is that the stuff from Radioshack? Looks like a thicker oil? Thanks!
 

Derek Dean

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Howdy nvfenixt1 and welcome to CPF,
To be honest, I think you will find about as many different opinions on what is the proper lube for both O-rings and threads as there are members here on CPF.

So, what to do? Well, first I'd try cleaning the threads again. Rubbing alcohol and a clean rag is fine..... just make sure you don't let any fluid drip down into the head, so hold it up while you clean the threads there.

Then try applying just a tiny bit of your lube. Folks often make the mistake of thinking more is better. In this application usually the opposite is true.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2102643
If you are still having problems, many folks have good results with this:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2102643
 

Armed_Forces

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Just think logically about all this.

Without getting into all the technical mumbo jumbo of the various lubricants available for use, if you have "gritty" threads, you have a foreign substance that needs to be addressed and NOT the type of lubricant. Whether this is caused by contamination or deformation will require a close inspection followed by cleaning and/or chasing of the threads. Clean and inspect the threads with the aide of magnification. If you don't see anything embedded in the threads or notice any roughness, re-assemble dry sans O-ring, and check for smoothness. You need to apply pressure pressure in both directions to take the slack out of the threads and to help determine on which side of the thread the "grit" is present. If things seem smooth, add a drop or two of oil and see how it feels then. If, after all that(!), the threads feel smooth, re-apply your silicone goop you tried originally and see if you have the same results. If you do, throw that crap out and buy something of better quality!

Be forewarned, depending on what is causing the gritty feeling, if caused by a foreign substance, said substance can become embedded in the threads and removal will only be possible by chasing the threads. This removes material and is detrimental to having a tight fit. An alternative to chasing is to lap the threads. In aluminum, you can use cheap toothpaste to smooth them out. You just apply and work it back and forth till you get bored or have the desired effect. If you're dealing with stainless steel/titanium you can get some very fine machinist's lapping compound and use it the same way, but sparingly! Remember, every twist is removing metal and increasing the tolerance of the thread. Ti is probably best just "worn in" unless the machinist was a total hack, but always keep it lubed with Teflon or Krytox. Good luck.
 
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asdalton

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After a lot of trial and error, I stay away from putting grease on threads. I use silicone grease on the o-rings. For threads, I use DeoxIt Gold (if bare/conductive) or silicone oil (if anodized).
 

lebox97

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"NyoGel® 760G is not conductive, but it was designed for lubricating surfaces that are conductive"

Nye Lubricants does have conductive lubes if desired

yes I use the RS stuff - a dab will do, as previously stated less is better...
and, I (and most of us) use Caig Progold/DeoxIT Gold on all of my lights and electronics. (52 years of making "Brighter Lights"!)


Thanks for the welcome and the reply.... Nyogel is a dielectric... Don't most of the flashlight folks use that on their lights?

"teflon-silicone lube on O-rings"... Is that the stuff from Radioshack? Looks like a thicker oil? Thanks!
 

nvfenixt1

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Oct 16, 2008
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And now my Flashlights feels gritty when twisting them (one has aluminum threads and the other stainless steel). The product I used is is made by AGS and labeled "Dielectric Silicone Compound for electronic systems". The product itself looks like the pictures of Nyogel I've seen and has the same basic description. Why would this stuff cause the threads to feel gritty? I first cleaned the threads thoroughly with rubbing alcohol and allowed them to dry completely. And evenly applied the grease with a clean brush. Did I do something wrong, or do I just need to buy Nyogel. Thanks for any advice you can offer.

Well, that was it! I just got Nyogel 760G last night; cleaned and lubed my light with it..... no more gritty feeling! It feels just as smooth as it did when it was new! Thanks all!:grin2:
 

danpass

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Well, that was it! I just got Nyogel 760G last night; cleaned and lubed my light with it..... no more gritty feeling! It feels just as smooth as it did when it was new! Thanks all!:grin2:

Cool. According to their tech support that's what Surefire uses.
 

chmsam

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I also want to remind folks that it is almost always better to use as little grease or lube as necessary. Apply as small a quantity as you can and gently wipe off any excess with a clean cloth. Extra grease and/or lube tends to attract grit and dirt and extra oil tends to migrate (basically to run, drip, and/or "leak" into areas you don't usually want it).
 

nvfenixt1

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Does anyone know of a store that might have Nyogel 760G? Maybe Lowes or somewhere like that?

Not sure about your area, but I checked my Lowes, Radio Shack and local hardware stores with no luck. I ended up buying it from lighthound.com; problem is, after shipping you end up paying a pretty penny for the stuff. I purchased almost 2 oz. of Nyogel 760G; more than enough for my lifetime. Maybe I should package and sell the extra... ;-)
 

danpass

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Lighthound ............ hmmmmmmm


All I wanted was Nyogel 760. But noooooooo I had to get 50g and they made me buy those very cool 25mm McGizmo clips and glow-in-the-dark lanyard clips and .........


I was barely able to make it out of there without getting another flashlight and batteries and ..........



:twothumbs
 
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jzmtl

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Plastic is fine, and most of today's o ring are made of nitril rubber that's pretty much immune to vaseline.
 
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