{{ Stuff that just works }}

Jean-Luc Descarte

Enlightened
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Jul 29, 2020
Messages
845
Location
Where the sun sets fast
Shout out to watchmaking tweezers. They're outstanding for moving tiny parts and components such as driver chips, centering rings and emitters, and especially in our hobby, they fit perfectly into the holes of retaining rings. If you don't need to use force (and by consequence, the sturdiness of needle nose pliers) for a given task, consider using these tweezers. They make my life in flashlight maintenance and care so much easier.
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
20,833
Location
NYC
Neon-colored Silicone trays with raised borders and small magnetic screwdrivers used together. No more tiny, dropped screws that magically and instantly vanish when they fall off the table and onto the floor! Yes, I've had that happen more often than I can count.... until, well; until I started using a certain combination together. And no, paper-towels and non-magnetic screwdrivers are NOT good enough!

Bought me a Kershaw/RJ Martin collab. folding knife off of Etsy a while back. Only $15. No damage, no worn off finish. Looked completely brand new. Just missing the box. Sweet deal! Clip on the wrong side for me. Problem fixed very easily using two certain tools, together! I'm a very happy camper.
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
20,833
Location
NYC
The more I think about it, the more I'd say older hand-tools.
I mean the ones Made in America. Back when our grand-fathers were just children themselves. Those old hand-tools were made with pride, and literally built to last decades if taken care of. No cheap junk that was designed to fall apart on you after a few uses so you'd have to throw them away, and buy new ones just as crappy. Basically, before America became infected with the Disposable Society mentality.
 

tex.proud

Enlightened
Joined
Mar 31, 2016
Messages
526
Location
Texas
Has anyone mentioned shoes yet? A few years ago I went on the hunt for the perfect pair of hiking boots. I probably tried on 100 pairs at different stores before finding the Drifter model from Asolo. I swear they used a mold of my foot to make them. I put 10 miles on them, and went right back to get a second pair that still sits in the box in my closet waiting for me to wear out the 1st pair.

In the flashlight realm, my 2 HDS Rotaries. Carried the 18650 for 8 years before getting the cr123.
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
8,495
Location
Northern New Jersey
Re: Shoes
I believe that each manufacturer models feet and creates a footbed that they believe will be comfortable for the most feet in each size.
My feet are 10 1/2 to eleven and I have found that New Balance shoes fit like they were made for me.
I once had a pair of Puma running shoes that were NOT good for me. I was better served by a cheap pair of shoes I got at Sears. At the time the Puma's were the most expensive shoes I ever bought. So... price is not the gate keeper.
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
20,833
Location
NYC
I'll say it.... Good ole' SureFire 6P and 9P incandescent models.

Why? Because they're so incredibly simple that nothing can go wrong except a burnt-out bulb. And for obvious reasons, that doesn't count.
 

letschat7

Suspended
Joined
Dec 7, 2022
Messages
0
O-rings can wear out thread too. The lense can break, the rubber boot can wear out, switch isn't covered by warranty, batteries could be misused and blow up. The drop in may not fit.

I use them both too though. As much as we say and think we love Surefire 6P and Surefire 9P we drop a lot of coins on accessories and upgrades. Like seriously I could have bought a used Mercedes for what I have in three lights and I'm not even done with them and Elzetta Charlie does it better anyways.
 
Joined
Sep 30, 2020
Messages
269
Location
Caught In An Airduct
The more I think about it, the more I'd say older hand-tools.
I mean the ones Made in America. Back when our grand-fathers were just children themselves. Those old hand-tools were made with pride, and literally built to last decades if taken care of. No cheap junk that was designed to fall apart on you after a few uses so you'd have to throw them away, and buy new ones just as crappy. Basically, before America became infected with the Disposable Society mentality.

I inherited this "Columbian" vise from my grandfather on my dad's side. He passed at age 64 in 1976 when I was in 3rd grade, and this antique beauty went to my dad. It sat on a shelf in the basement for years since he already had a capable old Craftsman on his bench. Years later in my mid 20's I was hanging with my dad in his basement shop. We did that a lot in those days. I mentioned that I was going to buy a vise to set up in my apartment. I was living in Virginia Beach at the time. Dad said, "You need a vise?", and he turned around to that very same shelf behind him, and he handed me this.

I'll bet it's 100 years old now, and the only thing that gives away its age is that it's still in good shape! I've beaten the crap out of it with "old school normal use" for 3 decades now, and it barely needs a paint job. "Made in USA" is still clearly visible on its side. I was a bit young in '76, and, regretfully, the few and fading memories of my grandfather don't hit me like they once did. But I do really miss my dad. He passed in 2018, and I still (on a good night) have the occasional dream of working with him in his basement shop.

20240531_150813.jpg
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
20,833
Location
NYC
My condolences for both your grand-father, and father. Didn't know either of my grand-fathers. Dad passed away 7 years ago, today.

Just sickening how that Era of America is gone forever. The tools from back then that still survive will easily outlive us all.
 
Joined
Sep 30, 2020
Messages
269
Location
Caught In An Airduct
My condolences for both your grand-father, and father. Didn't know either of my grand-fathers. Dad passed away 7 years ago, today.

Just sickening how that Era of America is gone forever. The tools from back then that still survive will easily outlive us all.
Dude. My sincerest condolences to you as well. In so many ways we stand upon the shoulders of giants.
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
8,495
Location
Northern New Jersey
Have you guys seen these "Vampliers" before? I found them on AMZ a year or 2 ago. They also have a needle nose variant. Very versatile, but they are obviously designed primarily for removing broken or stripped screws from tight spaces wherein Vise Grips won't do the trick. Not German-made, but close enough! ;)

View attachment 63287
I haven't seen them, but they are certainly interesting. They belong in the specialty tool category.
 

PhotonWrangler

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
14,563
Location
In a handbasket
Have you guys seen these "Vampliers" before? I found them on AMZ a year or 2 ago. They also have a needle nose variant. Very versatile, but they are obviously designed primarily for removing broken or stripped screws from tight spaces wherein Vise Grips won't do the trick. Not German-made, but close enough! ;)

View attachment 63287
I have a much smaller version of these with the same type of grip. Japanese made. Much pricier than regular pliers but worth it when you need it for that purpose.
 
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