Summer hammock camping on the AT.

Wurkkos

Woods Walker

The Wood is cut, The Bacon is cooked, Now it’s tim
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
5,434
Location
New England woods.
A friend came down from the cold north for a walk on the AT. The plan ended up being 45 miles for 5 days though the electronics said it was 58 miles as it measured each foot step. We got a late start on the first day so would have to pull some miles to get this done. Temps were in the 90's for most of the outing. Humidity was high. Out in the sun it was oppressive but under tree canopy more reasonable.


It's a GO!





Trouble brewing. My belt was too big as lost some weight over the past year or so. The result was all the weight was on my shoulders. This really really was a PITA. LOL! Canadian guy took his Pointman which worked out very well.








First night camping. Fenix CL20 lantern was my one luxury item.





The jet boil worked very great. I took my Pocket Rocket which also worked well but considering a Jet boil in the future.





Hammock camping. We both used Hennessy hammocks. I took a 10x12 tarp in case of rain.





Zebralight SC5w and DIY fire starter.





I hate to lose kit so bright/reflective cordage is often employed.





My UL kit.





Back on the trail.





Beavers!











Glacial erratic.





Upper Goose pond was a paradise on the AT. I got to swim and hang out with some cool thru hikers! I am going back here before they shut down. One of the largest shelters I have seen on the AT. There is another shelter near Bear Mountain in NY which is impressive but this one got that beat.


























Hard to see but the lake is out there. Good swimming!





Our target was North Wilcox however we found out it was dry so needed to go to South Wilcox around 16.5 miles. We came from October Mt.





On the trail.











My shoulders were killing me. I need to change my pack belt to a smaller one. Hiked into the might finally making it to South Wilcox.














Cooked in the lean-to but slept in the hammock. Setup the hammock without the rain fly for a change.





The shelter area was on a hill and lean-to smaller.





Water was tight for the entire trip. Found some in a rock spring. This water filter was useful.








Back on the trail.





Another shelter but only stopped for lunch. Once again I would be hiking into the night but this time some rain moved in.





Our camp setup around 1 am.





The big tarp finally came into play.





Nice to cook under such a large canopy.





Another hot day!





Back on the trail.





Made it!





It was a good outing with the exception of the shoulder stress from my pack which was just crushing. Oh well nothing is perfect. Our water filtration worked well. The Sawyer squeeze and Canadian guy's base camp filter really came through. I must have drank over 2 gallons in a day. Here is a video of the outing.




Thanks for watching.
 

HorizontalHunter

Enlightened
Joined
Nov 22, 2015
Messages
311
Looks like you had a great trip. I used to hunt October Mountain SF many moons ago.

I always look forward to your posts. Thanks for sharing.

Bob
 

scout24

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 23, 2008
Messages
8,579
Location
Penn's Woods
Thanks for the posting, and the video! It never ceases to impress me how well kept the hiking shelters are. I realize there is regular maintenance, but given the foot traffic, it's nice to see them kept neat during the season.
 

Woods Walker

The Wood is cut, The Bacon is cooked, Now it’s tim
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
5,434
Location
New England woods.
Thanks for the posting, and the video! It never ceases to impress me how well kept the hiking shelters are. I realize there is regular maintenance, but given the foot traffic, it's nice to see them kept neat during the season.

One of the pros beyond the trail crews etc are often (there are exceptions) these are some distance hard hike from the road. The lazy boozer trash throwing goobers are too lazy so they go to a parking lot or drive in park. LOL! Also lots of people going to these are not packing much extra weight and are more a responsible type. Though I did see a drug deal go down at one of the shelters. A bowl hit for 16 oz of water. Thanks for looking!
 

KeepingItLight

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
May 25, 2015
Messages
1,823
Location
California
Thanks for the vicarious adventure!

One question: why the term "clandestine?" Although you did not explain, I took that to mean that you decided to stop hiking before reaching a shelter or designated campsite. You set up camp alongside the trail.

Out here in California, you can camp anywhere in a National Forest, except where camping is expressly forbidden. In a National Park, such as Yosemite, rules are stricter, depending where in the park you happen to be.

I can hardly wait until you take a Sierra hike, and post some video. The entire range was formed when one large, 400-mile-long, slab of granite was pushed (or, more precisely, tilted) up by the Pacific Plate sliding beneath the California Plate. The process continues, and the Sierra continue to rise. Rather than a series of isolated volcanic peaks, of the sort you find in the Cascade Range to the north, Sierra peaks line up along the top ridge of this granitic slab. In many cases, there is no deep valley between peaks. The Pacific Crest Trail stays near the ridge, and takes you from peak to peak.

Soil forms readily at the lower elevations, and the forests there are dense. At the top, however, there is limited soil. The forests thin out, and, many times, the vistas are wide open. Frequently, they are spectacular. It is common to be able to see 5, 10, and 20 miles at a time, and not just at the end of hike, when you reach a mountain top. You get these views for the entire hike! The granite also lends itself to the formation of small lakes. There are seeming hundreds or thousands of them.

Summer weather is mild up top. In Yosemite Valley, for instance, when all the yahoos are visiting in July and August, the temperature at 4000 feet is frequently above 90 degrees Fahrenheit. By the time the tourists all arrive, the waterfalls have stopped running, and the hot valley floor is exactly the place you do not want to be. On the same summer day, the temperatures at 8500-foot Tuolumne Meadows are usually in the comfortable 70s. But most of the tourists never go there!

If you take a hike, you can shake more of the famous Yosemite crowds. At about a mile in, the character of the people you meet changes. Most of the silly folks don't make it that far. When you leave the trail, you can easily find solitude. In the right location, bushwhacking is a joy in the thin forests of the Sierra. I have been to lakes in Yosemite that have no trails leading to them!

I have a bad hip now, so I have not been able to hike lately. That's why I love to go along with you on your video adventures. Keep 'em coming!
 
Last edited:

Woods Walker

The Wood is cut, The Bacon is cooked, Now it’s tim
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
5,434
Location
New England woods.
Thanks for the vicarious adventure!

One question: why the term "clandestine?" Although you did not explain, I took that to mean that you decided to stop hiking before reaching a shelter or designated campsite. You set up camp alongside the trail.

Out here in California, you can camp anywhere in a National Forest, except where camping is expressly forbidden. In a National Park, such as Yosemite, rules are stricter, depending where in the park you happen to be.

I can hardly wait until you take a Sierra hike, and post some video. The entire range was formed when one large, 400-mile-long, slab of granite was pushed (or, more precisely, tilted) up by the Pacific Plate sliding beneath the California Plate. The process continues, and the Sierra continue to rise. Rather than a series of isolated volcanic peaks, of the sort you find in the Cascade Range to the north, Sierra peaks line up along the top ridge of this granitic slab. In many cases, there is no deep valley between peaks. The Pacific Crest Trail stays near the ridge, and takes you from peak to peak.

Soil forms readily at the lower elevations, and the forests there are dense. At the top, however, there is limited soil. The forests thin out, and, many times, the vistas are wide open. Frequently, they are spectacular. It is common to be able to see 5, 10, and 20 miles at a time, and not just at the end of hike, when you reach a mountain top. You get these views for the entire hike! The granite also lends itself to the formation of small lakes. There are seeming hundreds or thousands of them.

Summer weather is mild up top. In Yosemite Valley, for instance, when all the yahoos are visiting in July and August, the temperature at 4000 feet is frequently above 90 degrees Fahrenheit. By the time the tourists all arrive, the waterfalls have stopped running, and the hot valley floor is exactly the place you do not want to be. On the same summer day, the temperatures at 8500-foot Tuolumne Meadows are usually in the comfortable 70s. But most of the tourists never go there!

If you take a hike, you can shake more of the famous Yosemite crowds. At about a mile in, the character of the people you meet changes. Most of the silly folks don't make it that far. When you leave the trail, you can easily find solitude. In the right location, bushwhacking is a joy in the thin forests of the Sierra. I have been to lakes in Yosemite that have no trails leading to them!

I have a bad hip now, so I have not been able to hike lately. That's why I love to go along with you on your video adventures. Keep 'em coming!

Some areas it is forbidden to camp anyplace other than a designated spot but others it's ok. Then again there is the unspoken rule of hiker safety as well. If you can't make it no one expects someone to die etc. We had clearance on both accounts as wasn't going to make it up the next part of the hike at 3 am in the rain without a serious risk of injury or death. We actually blundered into a young women who was camped out in a clearing within a pine Forrest an hour or so before. I guess she didn't make it as well. LOL! Sorry about your injury. A few years ago I was beaten down with diabetes. The foot pain was so bad I had to give up hiking for a time. I beat that despite medical docs etc who thought otherwise. So who knows. Anything is possible. You might yet be back on the trail! Thanks for looking!
 

Firebottle

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Aug 18, 2016
Messages
9
Thanks for sharing your adventure. Makes me look forward to hunting season and getting way out in the woods even more!
 
Top