Sunglasses

bykfixer

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I read a bunch of reviews about Luepold shades. Nearly all spoke of the "lack of fashion" but ended up prefering them over Costas, Mauis and Ray Bans because the vision was so clear.

My thought was "did you not see the shades in a photo or in a shop before buying them? Saw they were plain Jane, bought them anyway then took away a star on your review because they are plain Jane?" Me, I'm not looking to have a hollywood celeb look or look like a Rambo type. So I picked the Mantai frame because they're plain Jane.

Edit:
Speaking of plain Jane;
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Found these Korean made Ray Ban wayfarer knockoffs in my work truck today. These were a pretty close copy of the earlier version down to the glass lenses before they added Ray Ban to the arm and lens. Nice, solid pair of cheap sunglasses.
 
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knucklegary

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These lumber yard 6.99 specials are what I have been wearing lately. Made in Singapore rated Z87+ meaning they'll withstand a blow from a grape shot at 3 meters..
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I have been told by reliable sources the top of my head looks just like Bruce Willis. Personally I feel mine looks better (-;
 

bykfixer

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I was the person behind ole Bruce at a Wal Mart in Kitty Hawk NC one day. He was surpringly short. He was buying a kite for his young son. He was slightly incognito in that he had let his hair grow some. He had scars on his chrome dome. We figured it may have been from Demi smashing a plate over his head or something before they divorced.
 

knucklegary

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Stallone is also a short guy. Funny how they portrayed him as a light heavy boxer. He is (was) more like a middle weight. His fight scenes with Hogan was hilariously funny
 

knucklegary

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Love the screwdriver!
I remember on another thread you were asking about bits; The very best quality I found to be is Wiha "Quattro".. Although, recently bought driver bits made by TDC Cutting Tools. They are quality tool steel, perfect hardness, along with TiN gold plating ~ McMaster-Carr is where i found them available..
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Btw, you'll need to inquire CS for exact product mfgr., I was expecting Wiha and received TDC..
MM-C will not sell junk.

Sorry to get a little 'bit' off subject 😁
 
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bykfixer

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Went digging deep into the vintage sunglass collection today after finding those fake wayfarers.

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Early Luxottica owned Ray Ban John Lennons circa 1996 or 97

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Foster Grant glass lens numbers from the mid-90's. Case was from my BMX team days.

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Early Maui Jim Corral Reef circa early 90's with original case and Hobie Rappolo when Hobie still used glass in the late 1980's. Not orginal case.

I have one more pair of Ray Bans with gradient lenses like Elvis wore but cannot find them and a pair Chinese made Costa aviators I also haven't found yet.
 

bykfixer

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The Leupolds arrived today. Yay!
In a word: impressed.
Polycarbonate lenses show me why I wear prescriptions. These are not as clear and crisp as say Maui Jim lenses but they are far more clear than any other polycarbonate lenses I own including Costas, Hobies and other rhinestone shades. I chose gray (slight) mirror and in low light my vision with them on is more fuzzy than without them but in plenty of light I don't see a difference between shades or no shades.
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The hinges impressed me in that they have a detent that causes the arms to "pop" open or closed at about 45 degrees. They fit me perfect with no binding at the ears. Some complained the nose bridge area is not adjustable, but what plastic frame shades have that? None that I know of. These have a rubberized contact point on each side.
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They come in a really nice box. Inside the box is a really nice case. Inside the case is a nice micro-fiber bag to hold them. And in the case is a storage area with a microfiber cleaning cloth. Another nice feature is cleaning instructions.
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Some would say they feel cheap. They feel like plastic frame sunglasses. Nothing more, nothing less. I don't know that I'll buy more just to have more but if something happens to them I'll probably replace them. Assembled in the good ole US of A using foreign and domestic parts.
 

bykfixer

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Day 2 with the Leupolds and I'm finding them worth the price. Other than clarity I wouldn't put them above the pricier shades I own. The clarity is up there with some of my glass lens'd Ray Bans. Usually I'd switch from shades to my prescription glasses to type this but I don't need to with these babies.

Ordinarily after a little while shades are noticable, either because the frame becomes distracting or there is an irritation until I get used to them. These are not like that. It's like putting in gray lens contacts or something because they are so comfy and the frame is not noticed. Not some gigantic lens like Gargoyles either. I'm not seeing rear reflective objects like some said in reviews.

On a cloudy day the mirrored gray lenses are not ideal. A green or amber would probably be better. Lighting is same top to bottom. I suppose if there's anything I don't like it would be the big ole brand name applied to the arms.
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I'd prefer the "L" target logo I suppose.
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But that's just me. I'll probably use a sharpie to paint the gold lettering black eventually.
 

bykfixer

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I figured by now I had mentioned Caribean Sun shades. Think half price Maui Jim's. Super clean glass lenses with a bunch of coatings to polarize, refract light, repel water and dust and all that jazz.
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Sturdy frames, light weight yet solid.
The gunmetal frame of these pilot shades (called Rum Cay by Caribean Sun) are acurate and comfy.
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They come with a nice clamshell case that's not real big.
Inside is plenty of room for the micro fiber bag, a lanyard if you choose and the shades. Unlike a Maui case that snaps closed like a snapping turtle and fight you to open these cases close solid without the pain and can easily open with one hand.

I found them at WalMart for under $100. Way more comfy than AO or Randolph pilots shades.

Carribean Sun doesn't have the million choices of styles or the massive sponsorship budget like Ray, or Jim so the price is reflected accordingly, but the value is there like those more expensive numbers. They're made in China.

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The gray lens, aqua blue mirror style (called Island Time) have metal frames with acetate arms that has a metal rod through it. Great for cloudy days as it brightens up the world while hardly changing the tint.
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Last but not least are the wrap around's (called Cutler) I wear to cut grass in.
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Again, black metal frames and acetate arms with a metal rod down the middle. The gray lenses are dark enough when it's sunny, not so dark that cloudy skies are an issue and the glass is completely distortion-free.

That's the 3 styles WalMart sells.

Edit, WalMart now has other styles too.
I picked up the new kid called Cocoa Bay today. They have Caribean Sun sunglasses for $4 less than last year, when they were $86.
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A grey lens with a slight green tint in a metal frame surrounded by acetate. Solid metal arms.

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Here's what the slight green tint does.
Super duper clear glass lens.
 
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bykfixer

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Who's that behind those Foster Grants?

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I know, I know, why does that guy keep posting about sunglasses?
I wanted to boast a little about Foster Grant sunglasses. They're made out of the same stuff as the expensive brands but are less than $20.

The pictured ones were $9 at WalMart and the plastic lenses are just as clear as my Hobies and Oakleys. Actually more clear than a pair of plastic lens Ray Ban wayferers I bought a few years ago. Solid hinges, rubberized frames that fit nice and snug without squeezing my noggin.

So if you want a nice pair of shades for not a lot of dough give Foster Grant a try.
 

bykfixer

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Ray Ban has a new Wayfarer. (Well, 2001 new)
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The 2132 is a bit different than the 2140
Left is the new version.

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Right is the 2140 that angles toward the face some causing the bottom of the frame to touch some peoples face.

I like both but actually prefer the old way in some regards but do like that the new ones are angled away from the face more. Overall they just fit better and are more comfy for all day comfort.
 
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bykfixer

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Speaking of wayfarers without the slant;
The 2140 vs 4340
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Some say the 4340 is a new design but... it seems it was an 80's idea that was brought back. It was pretty much the same shaped frame as the ones going back to the 1950's yet the original has a slope of the lenses some don't like.
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Note how much pitch the original lenses have.

I do not know why Ray Ban ditched the 4340 or when but did read about some folks thanking Ray Ban for bringing them back.
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The 4340 has much less slope of the lenses

Now the 2140 has 3 size options. 47mm wide lens for kids or small faces, 50mm for "most" and 54 for large faces. The 4340 currently comes in one size, the 50mm wide with the same 22mm bridge width and 42mm tall lenses. So if you like the 2140 wayfarer look but don't like the slope touching your cheek bones or the gap at the top of the lenses between your skull and the shades letting in light the 4340 is a viable option (again).

I used some Santa cash and Kohl's cash to purchase some nice little Hurley shades called Cush. A china made frame with US made polarized polycarbonate lenses. The frame is part flexible plastic and part rubberized with a nice curve shape and a tactical feeling fit means no lanyard needed when wearing during active uses like fishing or running. Yet they don't squeeze your melon and become annoying after a while.
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The lenses are gray for overcast to sunny skies
Eh, not especially clear but not liken to really cheap sunglasses.
I don't see any great leaps in technology or anything all that special about these "born from water" rhinestone shades. Between being half price and Kohl's cash I paid about the same as a lunch from a fast food joint so if they get lost I won't be too bummed. But they are pretty comfy shades that block glare very well.
 

bykfixer

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More about wayfarers:
They were actually invented by an American Optical designer who was working for Bausch & Lomb at the time. They were meant to bistow an image like fins on a Cadillac of the time, mid 1950's. James Dean wearing them in the movies caused sales to go from "the way-what?" to "holy crap Marvin I've got to get me some of those". But all things pass. By 1979 the Wayfarer was slated to be removed from the Bausch & Lomb roster. It was said less than 20,000 pairs sold that year, worldwide. Oh, back then they were called the 5022 (and 5024 for larger headed folks). In 1980 the Blues Brothers wore them in the movie. Bausch & Lomb said "wait a second, first James Dean, now Belushi?" They made a deal to supply shades to movie set for like $50k. It worked too.

By the late 1980's over 60 movies had actors wearing them and sales skyrocketed. Yet again all things must come to an end and in the 90's the wayfarer was again seen as pase'. At one point there were over 40 versions of the 5022. And even though the Hollywood sect had dismissed them every gas station, department store and mall kiosks had tons and tons of look alikes.

In the 90's all things Oakley caused the genuine artifact to again nearly become extinct. Wrap around shades were all the rage and Bausch & Lamb had missed the boat. They themselves were ready to throw in the towel. In 1999 an Italian company Luxottica bought the Ray Ban division of Bausch & Lomb who were intent on sticking with microscope tech and contact lenses. But they sure had a good ride for a while thanks to pilots shades, shooter shades, motorcycle rider shades and cool guy shades like Wayfarers and Club Masters.

In the early 2000's Ray Ban introduced the "new wayferer" (2132) and 5022's were replaced with 2140's and instead of the silver tab on the arms at the temple a Ray Ban logo was placed there. And it was added to the right lens. Luxottica re-introduced a slew of classics including the gold frame, green lens we call John Lennon style, classic aviators and Wayfarers among others and now call them "the icons". Now the icons from a few years back has been reduced and changed a little.

Sales of the wayferer dropped again until some up and coming stars saw 5022's selling on eBay for big $. So again the 2140 is popular and now the 4340 even more so because it looks like the 2140 but wears like the 2132. The chief complaint of the 2140 is not the sharp angle of the lenses touching the wearers cheek bones, but instead because they won't stay propped up on the wearers head. Yup they either fall back of fall forward. The 4340's do not.

I'm still trying to find the history of the 4340.

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President Kennedy 3 weeks before that fateful day wearing American Optical wayferer style shades

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$5 Gas station, $25 clones and the real thing
- 1980's gas station numbers from a trip to Pigeon Forge Tenn. Very comfy, decent clarity and looked just like 5022's at a glance.
- 1980's Korean made knock off from Sunglass Museum. Acetate frames with a wire in each arm, glass lenses and aside from no slant wear a lot like the real thing.
- 2021 Ray Ban 4340.

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From above. The clones in the middle look similar

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The lens angle tells the story. That and hinges.
My favorite are the 80's gas station numbers because: Blues Brothers.

The tortoise shell kind was a big hit with surfers at first. It was a Hawiaan thing. But then the Gidget phenomenom (which made surfing into a money sport and no longer a counter culture activity) saw the ladies wearing tortoise wayfarers so it was later seen as "real me wear black wayfarers" amongst the crowd of posuers. I have some tortoise 5022's with Rx lenses somewhere from circa 1993 or so. They are fairly see-thru where my current tortoise are pretty dark 2140's and not see/thru.

Note in post #48 I said the John Lennons were 1996/97 when it should have said 2006/07. Oops
 
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bykfixer

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The first known sunglasses. ^^
Ivory from walrus tusks worn by Eskimos to reduce glare from snow.

Next mention was Emporer Nero wearing cut emeralds over his eyes to reduce sunlight while watching gladiator fights. Then flat panes of smoked quartz were said to be the initial sunglasses in 12th century China. But they weren't sunglasses. They were used to cover the eyes of judges to hide their reactions to events during tribunals.

In the 18th century "gondola glasses" were made of tinted glass. In the mid 18th century green and blue glass were used. Yet this was an attempt at corrective lenses, not shades. The 19th century historical documents rail way riders wearing sunglasses. They were called 'tainted spectacles'. And yellow or brown lenses were prescribed to syphillis patience to relieve the light sensitivity.

Civil War historians mention soldiers wearing sunglasses while on long marches. Egyption soldiers were also reportedly seen wearing 'tinted eye protectors' at that period. The first known ad for sunglasses was in the Souix City Journal in 1895. The first uv protection type were yellow tinted 😱.

In the late 1800's folks started thinking uv protection for eyewear. In 1899 the first uv protection type were sold. By 1913 glass lenses with cerium' blocked 100% uv rays. That was a huge leap forward. Then by the 1920's a new phenomenon called movie stars helped boost the popularity of sunglasses as the big names wore them often.

The masses could afford them in 1929 when Sam Foster started Foster Grant at a Woolworths on the Jersey Boardwalk using celuloid film. About that time (1929) Edwin Land (Polaroid founder) invented polarized film. It was not until 1936 that the first polarized shades called "day glasses" were produced. In 1935 Polaroid and American Optical created the very first polarized sunglasses though. In 1938 Life Magazine reported that 20,000,000 pairs of shades were sold in America in 1937.

In 1939 Polaroid Day Glasses reaped $35,000 in profit. In 1941 $1,000,000. But in 1940 they lost $100,000. Go figure. American Optical 'Cool Ray" division landed a contract with the US military in 1942 along with Polaroid day glasses and Bausch & Lomb. Others too but they were the big players at the time. In 1947 a resin called CR-39 was used to make plastic lens sunglasses.

I'll leave off there for now and pick back up later to include polycarbonate.

A place called Xiamen China is currently the largest producer of sunglasses, reportedly selling 120 million units each year.
 

bykfixer

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Polycarbonate was first discovered in 1898 in Germany but after 30 years of research was abanoned until 1953 when again the Germans developed a useful polymer. At the same time (a week later) a lab in the US developed a recipe. Both filed for patent. The Germans won. It was called Makrolon in 1958 by its German owner Bayer. The US owner GE called it Lexan in 1960. It was after 1970 before the brownish tint was able to be removed in favor of clear.

It was then that areospace use developed like the visor of space helmets or cockpit covers of jet aircraft. Flashlight makers like Kel-Lite, LA Screw and Maglite used this new wonder for flashlight lenses.

In the 1980's the demand for lightweight lenses was when polycarbonate use began for glasses and sunglasses. The 100% uv protection is an advatange. Another advantage is they are more impact resistant. Chromatic aberations at the peripherals is a disadvantage.

The new kid, Trivex was first developed for helicopter windows and other military applications due to its impact resistance being better than polycarbonate. It first showed up in 2001. It was deemed "shatterproof". It blocks uv rays better and is lighter weight. Superior clarity is a the whip cream on top and better at receiving tint is the cherry on top. However Trivex is cast mold while polycarbonate is injection mold. Cast mold takes longer and costs more so for now Trivex are not the norm.

Glass is still a viable option for sunglasses due to superior clarity but watch out, Trivex is catching up.
 
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