Sunwayman C10R (XM-L, 1xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOTS and more!

selfbuilt

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Warning: pic heavy, as usual. :whistle:

C10R007.jpg

C10R008.jpg


The C10R is the latest 1xCR123A/RCR-based light Sunwayman. How does it compare to the recently updated M- and V-series lines (i.e., M11R and V11R)? Let's see … :whistle:

Reported Manufacturer Specifications:
  • LED: CREE XM-L U2
  • Soft-contact Side Switch:
  • Three constant output modes: 190Lumens (1.5hrs) – 50Lumens (10hrs) – 3Lumens (50hrs)
  • Strobe: 190Lumens, SOS
  • Constant current circuit, constant output
  • Effective range of 103 meters
  • Uses one single CR123A Lithium battery or RCR123A, 16340 battery
  • Low-voltage indicator lamp
  • Working voltage: 0.9~4.2V
  • High quality OP reflector maintains great throw distance and spread with an ideal beam pattern
  • Dimensions: 82mm (length) x 25mm (head diameter)
  • Weight: 63g (battery excluded)
  • Aerospace-grade aluminum alloy
  • Military Specification Type III- hard anodized body
  • Waterproof, in accordance with IPX-8 standard
  • Ultra-clear tempered glass lens resists scratches and impacts
  • Tail stand capable- can be used as a candle
  • Accessories: O-ring, lanyard, holster, stainless steel lanyard ring
  • MSRP: ~$66
C10R006.jpg


My review sample was an early release, so it doesn't have the full packaging (the box above is the standard V11R packaging, with a "C10R U2" and "210 lumens" stickers added, so ignore the rest of the labels). I expect standard Sunwayman packaging will include a belt holster, lanyard strap, extra o-rings, manual, warranty card and product insert.

By the way, I understand Sunwayman will be dropping the "Torpedo" label on future batches of these lights. So I guess that makes these early production run samples limited editions … :whistle:

C10R044.jpg

C10R043.jpg

SENS001.jpg

From left to right: Duracell CR123A; Nitecore SENS CR, EZ 123; Eagletac D25C Clicky; Foursevens Mini 123; Lumintop ED10; Zebralight SC30; , V11R, C10R.

All dimensions are given with no batteries installed:

Sunwayman C10R: Weight: 57.3g, Length: 76.2mm (no lanyard plug), 82.3mm (with plug), Width (bezel): 25.6mm, Width (head at widest part): 28.6mm
Sunwayman M11R: Weight 45.8g, Length: 76.4mm, Width (bezel): 23.1mm
Sunwayman V11R: Weight 50.5g, Length: 84.3mm, Width (bezel): 23.1mm
Eagletac D25C Clicky: Weight: 30g, Length: 76.0mm, Width (bezel): 20.0mm
Rofis JR10: Weight 75.0g, Length (max): 110.6mm (angled): 92.9mm, Width (bezel): 24.8mm
Jetbeam PC10: Weight: 50.5g, Length: 93.6mm, Width (bezel): 22.6mm
Thrunite Neutron 1C: Weight: 45.2g, Length: 91.5mm, Width (bezel) 22.0mm

C10R009.jpg

C10R010.jpg

C10R017.jpg

C10R019.jpg

C10R020.jpg

C10R022.jpg


As with other Sunwayman lights, you still get the same rich, dark gray natural finish anodizing on the C10R. Sunwayman has always had one of the best quality finishes. As always, all labels are fairly small and bright white against the dark background. Overall build impression is similar to the T60CS I reviewed recently.

Like the M11R/V11R, Sunwayman has knurling or reasonable aggressiveness on the C10R. With other build elements (ridges, raised areas, etc), I would say overall grip is good.

The body tube is wide enough to take all primary CR123A and 16340 (RCR) Li-ion rechargeables, but 18350 is too wide to fit.

Rather than a control ring or tailcap clicky switch, the C10R is controlled by Sunwayman's new "Smart Switch" - an electronic switch in the head (under a rubber button cover). Switch feel is good for this type of switch, with a definite "click" upon activation. Scroll down for a discussion of the UI.

There is a red LED on the other side of the head from the switch, which serves as a low voltage indicator for the battery. Note this only works with RCR (16340). See the UI section for a discussion.

Body diameter is different from M- and V-series lights (i.e., head/body parts are no longer interchangeable). There are more screw threads on the C10R than those other 1xCR123A/RCR lights, but they are no longer anodized for head lockout. :sigh: They remain square-cut though.

C10R024.jpg

C10R013.jpg

C10R011.jpg

C10R012.jpg


The tail region is interesting – there is a removable lanyard attachment ring. With the ring in place, the light cannot tailstand. With it removed, not only do you restore tailstanding, but the plug diameter perfectly fits a standard tripod mount (1/4-20 UNC). This means you could mount the light stably on a tripod base.

User Interface

With the head fully-connected against the body, turn the light off/on by the electronic clicky switch. The C10R has two options – click (i.e., quick press and release) for constant on, or press-and-hold for momentary.

As with some of the Spark and Zebralight models that use a similar interface, it may take you a little time to get the timing just right (i.e., too slow on the release, and the light will shut-off, thinking you wanted momentary). But this does give you option to signal with light if you want.

First time you activate the light, it comes on in Hi mode. Change output modes by pressing and holding the switch from clicked on. The light will cycle between constant output modes in the following order: Hi > Med > Lo, in repeating order. Let go off the switch to select the mode you want.

Light has mode memory, and will retain the last constant output used when turning off and on.

There are a "hidden" strobe and SOS mode, activated and double-clicking the switch rapidly. On first double-click you get strobe, on second double-click you get SOS. Single click to turn off. Light returns to the memorized constant output when clicked back on.

As this is an electronic switch, a standby current is required (see below for measurements). To reduce the risk of accidental activation, Sunwayman provides a switch lock-out mode. After waiting a minimum of 7 secs with the light off, do a quick click followed immediately by a press-hold. After 1 sec, the light will shut off and cannot be re-activated until the lockout is deactivated. To restore full functioning, double-click the switch followed by a press-hold.

Unfortunately, you cannot physically lock out the light by a head twist, as the threads are not anodized.

There is a secondary red LED on the other side of the head from the switch, which will warn you when a RCR battery is running low. Note that RCR cell has to be charged >3.3V when first installed, or the circuit will assume it is a CR123A and not respond (i.e., there is no warning for CR123A cells). There is a brief double-flash when installing a fresh RCR cell, indicating it will monitor the battery charge.

In my testing, the indicator activated and glowed a constant red once a cell reached ~3.0-3.1V resting voltage. By this point, output had already dropped to ~10% initial output (see my runtimes below). On a protected RCR, it was a matter of a few seconds before the protection circuit engaged and the light shut-off. So the indicator is not so much an advanced output warning - you will already be well aware that the battery is nearly exhausted by the time the indicator comes on. It is really more of an indicator to let you know the protection circuit is about to trip, or that you should shut-down down to preserve an unprotected cell.

For information on the light, including the build and user interface, please see my new video overview:



Video was recorded in 720p, but YouTube typically defaults to 360p. Once the video is running, you can click on the configuration settings icon and select the higher 480p to 720p options. You can also run full-screen.

PWM

There is no sign of PWM that I can see, at any output level – I presume the light is current-controlled, as claimed. :)

C10R-HiNoise.gif


I did detect some high-frequency noise on Hi and Med (around the 14.3 kHz range), but was unable to detect it on Lo (although it may still be there at an undetectable level in my setup). In any case, this is not detectable by eye, and it not a concern.

C10R-Strobe.gif


Strobe is a standard "tactical" high frequency strobe, measured at 12 Hz.

Standby Drain

As the switch is an electronic one, a standby current drain is always present when a battery is installed.

I measured this standby drain at 9.8uA for 1xCR123A, which for a 1400mAh CR123A would lead to over 16 years before the battery would be drained. On 1xRCR, I initially measured 20uA, but this quickly dropped to ~14 uA. For 750mAh RCR, that translate into a little over 6 years before a battery would be fully drained. Either way, it is negligible, and not a concern.

Unfortunately though, you cannot physically lock-out the light – due to the lack of anodized threads. However, as explained above, Sunwayman also provides a switch lock-out mode that is activated by a quick click followed by a sustained press (see UI section). This would at least help prevent accidental activation.

Beamshots:

C10R015.jpg

C10R004.jpg


The C10R has a slightly larger head than typical for this class, with a smooth reflector. The reflector isn't very deep, so I would expect a wide spill beam (i.e., likely something similar to a number of Zebralights). Emitter was well centered on my sample.

And now, the white-wall beamshots. ;) All lights are on Max output on the identified battery type. Lights are about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall). Automatic white balance on the camera, to minimize tint differences.

1xRCR (AW Protected 750mAh) Li-ion Comparison:

C10R-RCR-Beam001.jpg
M11R-RCR-Beam001.jpg

V11R-RCR-Beam001.jpg
D25CXML-RCR-Beam001.jpg


C10R-RCR-Beam002.jpg
M11R-RCR-Beam002.jpg

V11R-RCR-Beam002.jpg
D25CXML-RCR-Beam002.jpg


C10R-RCR-Beam003.jpg
M11R-RCR-Beam003.jpg

V11R-RCR-Beam003.jpg
D25CXML-RCR-Beam003.jpg


C10R-RCR-Beam004.jpg
M11R-RCR-Beam004.jpg

V11R-RCR-Beam004.jpg
D25CXML-RCR-Beam004.jpg


1xCR123A Comparison:

C10R-CR123A-Beam001.jpg
M11R-CR123A-Beam001.jpg

V11R-CR123A-Beam001.jpg
D25CXML-CR123A-Beam001.jpg


C10R-CR123A-Beam002.jpg
M11R-CR123A-Beam002.jpg

V11R-CR123A-Beam002.jpg
D25CXML-CR123A-Beam002.jpg


C10R-CR123A-Beam003.jpg
M11R-CR123A-Beam003.jpg

V11R-CR123A-Beam003.jpg
D25CXML-CR123A-Beam003.jpg


C10R-CR123A-Beam004.jpg
M11R-CR123A-Beam004.jpg

V11R-CR123A-Beam004.jpg
D25CXML-CR123A-Beam004.jpg


The C10R is a slightly "throwier" than the Sunwayman M11R or V11R for the same output, with a more defined hotspot. But the C10R also has a wider spillbeam, and a clearer separation between hotspot and spill (i.e., less of a corona). It also has fewer beam rings than my M11R and V11R samples.

Note that actual overall output is pretty much the same on all three lights on 1xCR123A, and comparable between the M11R and C10R on 1xRCR. Scroll down for full output tables.

Testing Method:

All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, a la Quickbeam's flashlightreviews.com method. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

I have devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lightbox values to Lumens thread for more info.
Throw/Output Summary Chart:

My summary tables are reported in a manner consistent with the ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.flashlightreviews.ca/FL1.htm for a discussion, and a description of all the terms used in these tables.

C10R-FL1-Summary1.gif


C10R-FL1-Summary2.gif


Sunwayman reports 190 lumens Hi output spec on 1x CR123A in the manual (although the temporary packaging box also has a 210 lumen sticker on it). Regardless, output seems pretty close to this in my testing – quite similar to the M11R, in fact. The 50 lumen Med and 13 lumen Lo modes seem a little off though – see my detailed estimated lumen table below.

The report 130m beam distance seems rather optimistic (even though I know my standard light meter tends to under-report somewhat).

On 1xRCR, the max output on the C10R increases to a comparable level of M11R. Again see my tables below for a comparison of output levels across all Sunwayman models, on both CR123A and RCR.

Output/Runtime Comparison:

C10R-HiRCR.gif

C10R-MedRCR.gif


C10R-MedCR123A.gif

C10R-HiCR123A.gif


The Hi output level and runtime pattern is virtually identical between the C10R and M11R, on both CR123A and RCR. My C10R has slightly longer runtimes, but that is likely just natural variation between emitters/circuts (e.g. emitter Vf can have a big effect on runtime efficiency).

Efficiency also seems at least as good as the M11R on the Med levels, but output is a little higher on the C10R.

In fact, the C10R seems to have a more typical set of output levels for a Lo/Med/Hi light than the M11R (which had more a Moonlight low). C10R outputs don't exactly match the specs, though, as shown in the comparison table below.

C10R-Lumens.gif


Potential Issues

Switch timings may take a little getting used to. As you can activate a momentary mode by a sustained press, you must be quick on the press-release for it to register as a click (for sustained on). Other electronic switches (e.g., Zebralights and Spark) can similarly take some getting used to initially.

Due to the electronic switch, a small standby current is always required when a battery is installed. However, this drain was measured at an inconsequential level (i.e. several years before it would drain a battery).

Unfortunately, there is no way to physically lock out the light, as screw threads are not anodized. There is however a way to temporarily lock out the switch using a button-press sequence. I recommend you use it, as the protruding switch will likely be prone to accidental activation.

The low voltage warning only works with RCR (16340). The cell has to be charged >3.3V when first installed, or the circuit will assume it is a CR123A and not respond (this is understandable - otherwise, you would experience abnormal early warnings on primary CR123A). In my testing, the indicator activated around ~3.0-3.1V (resting voltage), by which point output had already dropped to ~10% of initial levels. The indicator is thus a warning of imminent triggering of the protection circuit (on protected cells), or a warning to shut-down unprotected cells immediately.

The lanyard attachment ring in the tail seems to hold fairly well when fully screwed in. But you should watch to make sure it doesn't loosen up if you plan to use it with the lanyard (i.e., once it loosens, it can be unscrewed fairly easily).

I am not sure what final packaging will include, but there was no clip bundled with my sample - and I don't see any obvious attachment points for one.

Preliminary Observations

This is the second light I've reviewed with the new "Smart Switch" from Sunwayman, and it continues to perform well.

There has been one UI addition since the T60CS model – the C10R now features a momentary mode (i.e. press and hold the switch from Off). :thumbsup: Of course, that means you will have to be quick of the press-release (i.e. "click") to activate the constant output modes from Off. As with all electronic switches that offer both momentary-on and click-on, it may take you a little while to get used to the exact timings.

The physical build is solid, with the trademark attractive natural anodizing finish from Sunwayman. I am not sure why they dropped the screw thread anodizing though (i.e., you can no longer physically lock out the light, but there is an electronic switch lock you can apply). Given the protruding switch design, I would have liked to see a physical lock-out. :shrug: The light also features a distinctive lanyard ring holder/tripod mount in the base, but a pocket clip of some sort would have been nice.

Performance wise, there is a lot in common here with the M11R, another 1xCR123A/RCR, defined-output light from Sunwayman. In fact, the output and regulation pattern on Hi is exactly the same between these two models, on either battery type. But the C10R has a more typical distribution of Lo/Med/Hi modes (see the comparison output table above for details).

It also has a bit of different beam pattern, due to the larger head and smooth reflector on the C10R. Not to worry, it is still quite "floody" overall, consistent with the broad hotspot produced by the XM-L emitter. Main difference is wider spillbeam on the C10R, and the reduced number of beam rings (i.e., it reminds me of some of the XM-L-based Zebralights).

The C10R is certainly another option to consider in the defined-output 1xCR123A/RCR class of light. If you want to know how the performance directly compares to the Sunwayman M11R and V11R, please check the tables and runtimes earlier in the review. :wave:

----

C10R was supplied by Sunwayman for review.
 
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JeffN

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Typically great review, selfbuilt -- thanks!

Was looking to add this light to the collection, but H/M/L sequence is a knockout.
 

Dubois

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Nice review, Selfbuilt, as per usual - thank you.

I'm looking forward to getting my giveaway :naughty:. Slightly surprised that the threads aren't anodised, it makes it a bit of a faff to use the electronic lock out.

One HK retailer's site shows that there is no clip included, just the lanyard and holster.
 

peterharvey73

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Can I confirm that the reflector is SMO?
The specs seem to say that it is an OP reflector?

So with a shallower, but bigger diameter SMO reflector, the C10R's wall shots see: the bigger reflector leading to a smaller but more intense hotspot over the M11R, but the shallower reflector leading to a wider spill, and that wider spill is dimmer.
However the C10R doesn't seem to have any dirty rings, which are more prominent on both the M11R and V11R.
Could the SMO reflector design also be causing a brighter hotspot, yet a rather dim spill?
 

selfbuilt

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Can I confirm that the reflector is SMO?
The specs seem to say that it is an OP reflector?
Yes, that is an inconsistency. But as you can see in the pics, it is definitely smooth on my sample. It may be the specs aren't final yet - I will check with SWM to see what they say.

However the C10R doesn't seem to have any dirty rings, which are more prominent on both the M11R and V11R. Could the SMO reflector design also be causing a brighter hotspot, yet a rather dim spill?
I doubt it has to do with the SMO - it's really a question of the reflector shape. The smaller heads of the M11R/V11R are a hold over from the earlier M10R/V10A, which were originally XP-G-based (actually, the original M10R was XR-E :rolleyes:). The original reflector design was better suited to small die emitters, and just adapted for XM-L.

The C10R looks to have a new design optimized for the XM-L emitter.
 

AILL

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Regarding the battery warning: the sample I could play with worked. 2 short flashes when installing a RCR battery, red light at 3,3V current.

Thank You for the review anyway!

Andreas
 

Swede74

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Thank you for another inspiring review.

Does disconnecting the battery reset the electronic lock-out? I hope it does, as it would make the light more foolproof.
yellowlaugh.gif


I think the tail end design opens for new possibilities: a nice accessory would be a watertight cylinder that can be screwed onto the light when the lanyard attachment ring is removed; big enough to hold either a spare cell or maybe some matches, needle and thread and a USB flash drive.
 
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orbital

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..
C10R013.jpg


Potential Issues

The lanyard attachment ring in the tail seems to hold fairly well when fully screwed in. But you should watch to make sure it doesn't loosen up if you plan to use it with the lanyard (i.e., once it loosens, it can be unscrewed fairly easily)..

+

Would an o-ring tucked underneath the lanyard screw help it from loosening on its own?

...btw..How's the heat in Canada??:cool:
 

selfbuilt

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Regarding the battery warning: the sample I could play with worked. 2 short flashes when installing a RCR battery, red light at 3,3V current.
Yes, I think the problem was I didn't notice the red light in time on my standard run with protected RCR. When I tried a nearly depleted cell and observed closely, I didn't see any warning flashes - but I also didn't see the 2 short flashes when installing.

Checking with SWM, they confirm the 2 flashes indicates that the circuit is monitoring the battery. But if the RCR is below 3.3V when it goes in, the circuit just assumes it is a CR123A and ignores it. This makes sense, as it is the way the circuit avoid constant flashing on CR123A. I have updated the review with this information.

I am also currently testing a non-protected IMR cell (3.8V to start, 2 flashes), and will carefully look for the red flashes and measure the resulting resting voltage when I see them.

Does disconnecting the battery reset the electronic lock-out? I hope it does, as it would make the light more foolproof.
yellowlaugh.gif
Yes, changing the battery resets the lock-out as you would expect (i.e., the lockout is only maintained while some power is being drawn).

Would an o-ring tucked underneath the lanyard screw help it from loosening on its own?
...btw..How's the heat in Canada??:cool:
Maybe, but it doesn't really seem to be necessary - with the screw fully tightened, it is pretty stable. It is just once you start to loosen it that it spins very freely.

And yes, it has been a bit balmy around here lately. Looking forward to the "cool" 29C high expected today ... :cool:
 

selfbuilt

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Update: I've re-tested the battery indicator, and it does work.

On an unprotected IMR cell, the indicator lit up a constant red starting at ~3.12V resting voltage on the cell. On a protected RCR, the indicator lit up at ~3.02V resting voltage.

But a couple of things to note - the reason I hadn't noticed it before on the protected run is the light turned off within about 3-4 secs of the indicator coming on (i.e., the protection circuit was tripped). This is not much of an advance warning.

Secondly, by the time this voltage level is reached, the light has already dimmed to ~10% of initial output. So, frankly, you will already be well aware that the battery is nearly exhausted by the time the indicator comes on. It is really more of an indicator to let you know the protection circuit is about to trip, or that you should shut-down down to preserve an unprotected cell. :wave:
 

Colonel Sanders

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"The body tube is wide enough to take all primary CR123A and 16340 (RCR) Li-ion rechargeables, but 18350 is too wide to fit."

My wallet thanks them.:broke: Wonder when more of the manufacturers are going to wake up and notice that some of us are no longer purchasing lights that can't take 18350s? The performance advantage over 16340s is just too great to ignore. No 18350s = deal breaker for me nowadays.
 

phips

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Eagletac's D25 Clicky series has set a pretty high bar concerning efficiency, cost and size.
I wonder how Sunwayman thinks this is a competitive product.
 

selfbuilt

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My wallet thanks them.:broke: Wonder when more of the manufacturers are going to wake up and notice that some of us are no longer purchasing lights that can't take 18350s? The performance advantage over 16340s is just too great to ignore. No 18350s = deal breaker for me nowadays.
You're welcome. This is actually the first review where I have commented on 18350. I have noticed increasing interest in this battery size lately, so I thought I would pass along a direct observation (i.e., given the larger size of the C10R, you might be wondering). But to be fair, very few RCR-sized lights will take the fatter cells (so far).

Eagletac's D25 Clicky series has set a pretty high bar concerning efficiency, cost and size.
I wonder how Sunwayman thinks this is a competitive product.
To be fair, the Sunwayman light fully supports all defined output levels on both RCR and CR123A (the D25C looses all medium modes) - there is an efficiency cost to that broader voltage support. The C10R also uses a head-mounted electronic switch - again incurring an efficiency hit over a traditional clicky. Finally, there is a low-voltage sensor, which again should have at least some minor drain. Taking all those aspects into account, the output/runtime efficiency seems quite reasonable (and consistent with current-control).

As always, it comes down to what feature set matters to the end user. But to facilitate that comparison, I've added the D25C XM-L form size measures and beamshots to the main review.
 
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AILL

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No 18350s = deal breaker for me nowadays.

Colonel Sanders,

the battery compartment of the C10R has really thick walls. I assume it will be no problem to bore them out to make 18350 fit. The head does already fit 18350.
Inside anodisation of course will be destroyed. But here I don't see any issues.
Maybe SWM takes this as a chance to improve the next series.

Andreas
 
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Colonel Sanders

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Selfbuilt, I really appreciate your commenting on whether this light takes 18350s. It's something I find myself wondering every time a new 16340 EDC comes out. VERY nice review as always! :thanks:

And I hope I don't come across to harsh about lights not taking 18350s...it certainly is a rare thing that they do. There was much to like from the looks of this light so I was really hoping that this light might take them. It certainly looked fat enough that it might.

I won't be going through the trouble of boring this light. If someone else does and offers it for sale then perhaps I'll bite. And if this light offered some serious performance (I've really grown accustomed to some XM-L lights blasting out 500-750L even in EDC size) then it would be worth the hassle to bore it.

This is a nice looking light with some neat features. :cool: Make it 18350able, GIVE IT A REALLY LOW MOONLIGHT SETTING (come on folks...gotta have the moonlight mode right these days!:ohgeez:), and perhaps a "turbo" mode would make it all the more better. :thumbsup:
 

selfbuilt

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the battery compartment of the C10R has really thick walls. I assume it will be no problem to bore them out to make 18350 fit. The head does already fit 18350.
I won't be going through the trouble of boring this light. If someone else does and offers it for sale then perhaps I'll bite.
Hmmm, not too sure how easy that would be. I measured the internal diameter of the C10R as 16.7mm (21.3mm external at the widest outer screw threads, ~20.9mm external at the inner thread groove). Given that my AW 18350s are at least 18.4mm at their widest point, you would need to shave off nearly 2 full mm (to give yourself a bit of margin).

Even if you only bored to 18.5mm, that would reduce wall thickness to 1.4mm at the thickest part of the thread, and <1.2mm at at the inner part of the thread. In theory, that should still be strong enough, but might be tricky to actually do the boring.


GIVE IT A REALLY LOW MOONLIGHT SETTING (come on folks...gotta have the moonlight mode right these days!:ohgeez:)
No argument on the moonlight mode, it's definitely something I like to see on all my EDC/pocket-sized lights.
 

Ualnosaj

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Colonel Sanders,

the battery compartment of the C10R has really thick walls. I assume it will be no problem to bore them out to make 18350 fit. The head does already fit 18350.
Inside anodisation of course will be destroyed. But here I don't see any issues.
Maybe SWM takes this as a chance to improve the next series.

Andreas

At that point wouldn't the C20C be a better option? It really is only marginally larger.



________________
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse the brevity of this message.
 
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