The long list of potentially useful stuff in bug out, SHTF, car kits, and more...

Poppy

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Even carrying 50% of these recommendations would require a pickup truck.

It might be more responsible to put a size and weight requirement here, with extra points for light and small.

I go for Dental Floss as a true multi purpose product, get waxed & you can suture, tie your shelter, sew your clothing, this stuff is tough, fishing line, repairs to a huge variety of items.
Yeah some of the suggestions are just short of a generator, compressor, and air tools, or a complete set of battery operated power tools, with extra saw blades, and drills.

No one suggested a have a heart trap, or RAT traps yet.

If you'll be living off the land. Rat traps are quicker, easier, and more reliable than deadfall traps, to set up, especially if you are on the move.
You might want to bring bait for the traps too.

This however would suggest that you are preparing for a major/prolonged move, not just 100-200 miles to a new location.
 

Monocrom

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Re: The long list of potentially useful stuff in bug out, SHTF, car kits, and mor...

JB Weld is a high strength epoxy.

http://www.jbweld.com

It not only lives up to the hype, it exceeds it. Should be a candidate for the "Stuff that just works" thread, if it's not there already.


I stand corrected. Thank you.

Might be a very useful item to toss in the BOV. :twothumbs
 

Going_Supernova

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Anything rubber based is a bad idea for a fuel tank fix, the petroleum will degrade many modern rubbers pretty quickly. Regular JB Weld is okay as long as there is no residual gasoline around the repair area. AutoWeld Epoxy (by JB Weld) is a better option as it will stick to the tank even when gasoline is present (i.e. an active leak), and is ready in 5 minutes (full cure in 1 hour) instead of 4 - 6 hours (full cure in 15 - 24 hours), bonus... it's even cheaper than regular JB Weld.


Yes, the Autoweld is the JB Weld product that I had in mind. http://www.jbweld.com/collections/automotive/products/autoweld
 

milehigher

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When I was a kid my father was an engineer for the government, and the only cars he would drive were 1967 Ford country squire station wagons , we had like three on the road , and about 15 in reserve for parts, his was well before undercoating were available so he would put them up and blocks with heat lamp for a couple of weeks to make sure they were good and dry then he would carefully apply 1.6 inches of some kind of epoxy he brought home from work, and would let that all cure before the car was road worthy again, that was one of the bigger modifications I remember him making aside from ensuring they were all heavily modified 8 cylinders with manual transmissions and some certain rear end suspension system that he favored, My dad did a lot of strange things like spent years burying drums of fuel in the yard, then when the oil crisis hit he never waited in any gasoline lines he just got us kids as cheap labor to work the hand pump to fill up the car . Sorry if this is a little topic deviant but these are memories of a man that you might say was the "pre- prepper/survivalist template" if he was alive today I can only imagine what he would be preparing for or why, he had a top secret clearance and would hear stuff at work and start preparing new and different things all the time , like when he spent the summer redoing the roof on the house so that he had reinforced solid steel access doors that remotely locked and unlocked as well as high speed motors to open them, sometimes he brought work home and I would therefor know some of what he was working on , however some things when asked why the standard answer is you will know when you are old enough and the time comes, a lot of it the time never came that he shared why he did them.
 

Going_Supernova

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When I was a kid my father was an engineer for the government, and the only cars he would drive were 1967 Ford country squire station wagons , we had like three on the road , and about 15 in reserve for parts, his was well before undercoating were available so he would put them up and blocks with heat lamp for a couple of weeks to make sure they were good and dry then he would carefully apply 1.6 inches of some kind of epoxy he brought home from work, and would let that all cure before the car was road worthy again, that was one of the bigger modifications I remember him making aside from ensuring they were all heavily modified 8 cylinders with manual transmissions and some certain rear end suspension system that he favored, My dad did a lot of strange things like spent years burying drums of fuel in the yard, then when the oil crisis hit he never waited in any gasoline lines he just got us kids as cheap labor to work the hand pump to fill up the car . Sorry if this is a little topic deviant but these are memories of a man that you might say was the "pre- prepper/survivalist template" if he was alive today I can only imagine what he would be preparing for or why, he had a top secret clearance and would hear stuff at work and start preparing new and different things all the time , like when he spent the summer redoing the roof on the house so that he had reinforced solid steel access doors that remotely locked and unlocked as well as high speed motors to open them, sometimes he brought work home and I would therefor know some of what he was working on , however some things when asked why the standard answer is you will know when you are old enough and the time comes, a lot of it the time never came that he shared why he did them.
Sounds like your father was one of The Greatest Generation, and had The Right Stuff. I did a little research on the car he preferred, and I can see why he was obsessed with it, it would have been a great Cold War vehicle/BOV. Take a look at the description and the specs available, it was quite a car when all tricked out. http://www.hemmings.com/magazine/hcc/2008/02/1966-1967-Ford-Country-Squire/1580044.html I don't know, but I suspect that the roof hatch was a way to escape if the house collapsed while occupied. That would be a possibility during a nuclear bomb attack. I wonder whatever happened to all of your father's Fords--I think I want one now!
 

milehigher

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I don't know he went a little crazy in the end of 1982 did some real nasty stuff, I was still young enough that the stateies, sheriff, and local PD took me at gunpoint and stripped him of custody and parental rights , then all my family both maternal and paternal disowned me ( my only crime -he was my father) my father and sister disappeared a few months later and he or she was not seen or heard from again until I found him about a week after his death in the SS death index, I did some searching and came up with the person who verified his identity upon his death who filled me in that he was obsessed with "security" and the thought that I would hunt him down and even the score, the bomb squad was called to empty out his cabin because this individual did not know what to do with a bunch of high explosives , cases of grenades and a room full of guns and ammo , I told him I would have held an auction for anything I didn't personally want ( this person did not find that funny ? ) and I really don't know what happened to his fleet of war wagons but man one would be sweet. They don't make em like they used to, before our family was destroyed he was hit by a semi on the way home from work one night destroyed the rear end of the car so it was his daily driver he did not care that the gas tank was destroyed, he re ran the fuel lines to a 55 gal drum he welded into the back, and called it done , that is what actually brought this up was the thought of that perforated fuel tank and his "little repair" .
 

Going_Supernova

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I don't know he went a little crazy in the end of 1982 did some real nasty stuff, I was still young enough that the stateies, sheriff, and local PD took me at gunpoint and stripped him of custody and parental rights , then all my family both maternal and paternal disowned me ( my only crime -he was my father) my father and sister disappeared a few months later and he or she was not seen or heard from again until I found him about a week after his death in the SS death index, I did some searching and came up with the person who verified his identity upon his death who filled me in that he was obsessed with "security" and the thought that I would hunt him down and even the score, the bomb squad was called to empty out his cabin because this individual did not know what to do with a bunch of high explosives , cases of grenades and a room full of guns and ammo , I told him I would have held an auction for anything I didn't personally want ( this person did not find that funny ? ) and I really don't know what happened to his fleet of war wagons but man one would be sweet. They don't make em like they used to, before our family was destroyed he was hit by a semi on the way home from work one night destroyed the rear end of the car so it was his daily driver he did not care that the gas tank was destroyed, he re ran the fuel lines to a 55 gal drum he welded into the back, and called it done , that is what actually brought this up was the thought of that perforated fuel tank and his "little repair" .

OMG!
You should write a movie about his life. What a story!
 

milehigher

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That would kinda be awkward because friends and Doctors are writing a book about me , one that I will never read , according to them every day of my life I redefine courage and strength and put new examples of sacrifice and honor into play , I don't think they are right , I am just playing the cards dealt as best I can guided by the PJ motto "So others may Live".
 

Monocrom

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Regarding main knife in your BOB:

Hey guys, just a few things about your main BOB knife. If you'd like the fixed-blade knife you're going to keep in your BOB to be made from S.S., you're going to have a tough time finding one suitable for survival during a bug-out situation. They exist. But we're talking almost literally just a handful of models. (Unless you're willing to go the custom route for a knife that'll hopefully stay unused in your BOB for many long years. Yeah, not likely something most folks would do.)

One thing to keep in mind when looking for a good S.S. one is that 440C is the most likely one you'll run into for larger fixed-blades. It's time tested and proven. Well, as with many steels from different parts of the world, 440C has an identical twin sister. Look for N-695 (or N695). Randall-Made knives uses O1 for their carbon steel blades, and 440B for their stainless versions. 440B in Japan is known as AUS-8 or AUS-8A or just 8A. Despite its less than great reputation, I've found AUS-8 is the best of the non-exotic steels. It'll bend before breaking, It's very rust-resistant (especially compared to much pricier and at one point "exotic" ATS-34 which is classed as a stainless steel), holds an edge for a good amount of time, and is very easy to re-sharpen compared to most other Stainless steels. And Hell, if it's good enough for Randall-Made to use in their knives....

And that's just the blade steel. Other features need to be right as well. I could right now easily order an ESEE 4 in the S.S. variation, online. But the blade is going to be too short for a Do-Everything fixed-blade in a BOB scenario. The ESEE 6 would be ideal, but ESEE doesn't offer an S.S. version. Recently ordered a Cold Steel SRK in the non-laminated VG1. (No luck finding the AUS-8 version which is older. Plus, even the non-laminated VG1 is discontinued. Was lucky to find that one.) So far the S.S. SRKs are the closest I've found to an ideal fixed-blade BOB knife. Yeah, they're full-tang, but not the type of full-tang where you can just slap a couple of aftermarket handle slabs on them if something happens. I consider their construction to be more of a hybrid rat-tail tang. One that maintains its thick rectangular shape all the way to the back of the kraton handle. "Full-Tang" is misleading.

Another thing too. A coated blade is usually best. In a Bug-out scenario, you don't want to be found. An uncoated blade is going to reflect sunlight where others can see it. But, food prep. is going to be an issue. Last thing you want is that coating flaking off onto that fish you caught, and then ingesting it after cooking. Last thing you need is to get sick while bugging out. Two solutions: One, don't bother with catching fish unless all your food in your BOB is gone. Or, use your uncoated neck knife or uncoated EDC blade for preparing fish or other foods. (Thankfully MREs and dehydrated food don't need to be cut up into smaller portions to eat.)

You might decide to risk it and go with an uncoated main blade. I don't think that's a good idea. A better solution, if you don't EDC an uncoated little fixed-blade neck knife; is to include one in your BOB. Weight won't be an issue, and you'll have an extra knife for smaller cutting tasks. Thankfully, neck knives made from S.S. are very common.

If you find a Stainless Steel blade you like, but there's no option for a coated version; just do what a lot of guys did during Vietnam..... Spray-paint the blade dull black in color.

Also....
Almost done testing that potential BOB product I mentioned earlier in this topic. Look for my review just after this weekend.
 
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irongate

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I hope this is not off -topic in this section, but no-body is bugging out unless on their two feet or a horse or donkey if we have a EMP Attack. unless you have a old car or truck with out all this new computer stuff.

A lot of very good suggestions here on what to carry and not to. Remember if your boots weigh more than a pound that is 4lbs added wight to your back.

Find some good old mountaineering books to read and Army and Air Force survival books to read.
 

Going_Supernova

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I'm not connected with Ace Hardware or any fire equipment supplier, but, if you need a fire extinguisher for your BOV, Ace has a heck of a good buy on one this weekend--a 1A10BC for $9.99 with customer loyalty card-and it's a refillable model! Oh, limit two at that price, unfortunately. I got mine! :thumbsup:
 
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Monocrom

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I hope this is not off -topic in this section, but no-body is bugging out unless on their two feet or a horse or donkey if we have a EMP Attack. unless you have a old car or truck with out all this new computer stuff.

A lot of very good suggestions here on what to carry and not to. Remember if your boots weigh more than a pound that is 4lbs added wight to your back.

Find some good old mountaineering books to read and Army and Air Force survival books to read.


Others have already discussed the (unfortunately) very real issue of not being able to be prepared for every type of issue that would require bugging out. Although you're right about older vehicles in case of an EMP, there's still issues with them. Vehicles first began being outfitted with electronics on a large scale starting in 1972, I believe. With each passing decade, finding vehicles with a lack of electronic aids becomes harder and harder. It's at the point now where your best bets are going to be access to such a vehicle that has been in the family for decades, a restored classic, or finding a junker and restoring it.

With the first, it's going to be pot-luck what's available. Dad's 1969 Camaro is going to be awfully cramped for a family bug-out. Even with one person in it, it's nowhere close to suitable for going off road. It might be in mint condition, might need a bit of restoring, or might need a complete and very expensive overhaul. Buying restored is going to be very expensive. One of those is going to be seen as a Collector's Car. And, it'll demand the expected premiums of one. Again, what's suitable for off road might be difficult to find. Same issues with expenses when restoring a junker. Especially if you pay someone else to do it. Even on your own, it'll take time and frustration in just tracking down the needed parts.

Then you have other issues. Imagine having to bug out with the family in a suitable, restored, older vehicle.... in the middle of Summer.... with no air-conditioning. I know what it's like to have heat-stroke. The TV newscasters try, but I've yet to see one accurately describe just how bad it feels.

Another issue, trying to drive around or get by every single vehicle that has stopped dead in its tracks right where it was just before the EMP hit. You might have an older off-road vehicle, but it won't help much if you first need to drive a few miles down a busy expressway to get to the place where you can drive off-road the rest of the way.

It's not a bad option at all as a BOV. But there are some real pragmatic issues with deciding to use one.

As far as military manuals go, I have a nice collection of them. Some useful info. to be sure. But much is dated. More modern texts on staying alive have more useful information.
 

Monocrom

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I'm not connected with Ace Hardware or any fire equipment supplier, but, if you need a fire extinguisher for your BOV, Ace has a heck of a good buy on one this weekend--a 1A10BC for $9.99 with customer loyalty card-and it's a refillable model! Oh, limit two at that price, unfortunately. I got mine! :thumbsup:


Nice score. :)
 

Monocrom

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Hey guys, here's my review of that potentially useful BOB item. Since it took longer than expected, you guys get a twofer. Both from Midland. On the right, their E+Ready Emergency Compact crank radio (ER210.) Next to that is one of their GXT1000 two-way radios. The radios come two to a pack, with all the accessories you'll need. They're not cheap, but you get some impressive technology inside of them.

Despite the bright red color of the E+Ready, I had hope that it would be a good emergency radio. But the overall lack of quality crushed that hope. The antenna is flimsy when you need to rotate it. It's so loose that it almost spins. The cover for the 18650 battery compartment is ridiculously thin, flimsy, and feels as though it would break very easily. The 18650 itself is a generic one sporting a Midland label around it. Due to the wires coming out of one end to plug into the radio itself, you can forget about swapping out the generic one with an AW or any of the better 18650s out there. The radio has no preset channels function. Which to me is important if you need to skip around to find a clear broadcast of any emergency info. being broadcast. I mean, what's the point of having an LCD display if you don't have a presets function.

Normally, an LCD display is not ideal because you can't actually turn off the radio. You can only put it into a (for lack of a better term) Sleep Mode. The batteries keep getting drained. Only at a slower rate. But if you're willing to use a radio with such a display, normally you get the benefit of a preset function. Not on this model. So you get the worst of both worlds. Three methods to charge up the radio. And if you're bugging out alone, forget the hand crank feature. With at least one other person, you can do other chores, while your partner cranks away. It takes a loooooooong time to get even a partial charge with the crank. Solar panel? When you're nearly constantly on the move, it might as well not even be there. So that means using a computer or tablet to recharge the battery. That's your best bet. And quite frankly, not a good one. If your laptop or tablet has a good charge, you don't need the radio feature. Obviously I'm expecting you guys to have tons of lights on you. so, no need for the flashlight feature. Accessing NOAA? okay, maybe.

I consider the biggest issue, other than the lack of quality, is the fact that you cannot simply toss in alkies when the rechargeable battery goes dead. And once again, recharging it is going to be an issue while bugging out. The technology itself inside the radio works flawlessly though. So does the flashlight. Problem is, it's housed in a cheap casing. Some parts of which, namely the battery door, antenna, and hand crank itself, are flimsy and feel like they might break off at any time. The radio itself though is not cheap. Yes, you can use the radio and the included cable to charge up your phone and other electronic devices. Just don't expect a full charge before the radio dies. Also, you should have a pre-charged device on you, in your BOB, for use on your mobile phone when it starts to die. It should be part of your "Communications" sub-category.

A 3-in-1 device sounds good. But the execution here is a bit poor. It's also bulky, though not heavy. One thing I learned early on putting together a BOB is that you want to give priority to thin items. If something is bulky, it better be a very important item before you toss it in your BOB. Overall, I'd say the E+Ready is best as a back-up radio already located at your BOL. Put it on your window sill and let the sun keep it charged up every morning. You'd honestly be better off with a small pre-charged device, a small hand-held radio, and be sure to toss one of your better headlamps into your BOB.

Speaking of bulky, I'm sure you guys noticed the bulk on the GXT1000 radio. Yes, it would be a bit less bulky without the clip in place. But this is one of those things I consider to be something I'm grabbing out of my bag first chance I get after I beat feet. Putting it on my belt. Mainly this, and my main BOB fixed-blade knife. Along with my large canister of bear pepper-spray in its belt pouch. (More for urban crowd control than bear attack.)

So the bulkiness isn't an issue here. The radio is a bit complicated. I'd say make a copy of the instruction booklet and keep it in your BOB. And that's even with having already read and practiced with the radio. Functionally, it's perfect. No issues. Just be aware that its range printed on the packaging is the same issue as the range every radio-maker prints on the packaging. Only realistic under the most ideal outdoor setting. In an urban setting with plenty of tall building getting in the way of radio signals, expect 1.5 or 2 miles of range, realistically speaking. Also, the excellent water-proofness of the radios is only good if you use the included rechargeable battery packs. That becomes clear when you realize there is no type of O-ring or rubberized seal of any kind on the battery cover.

Charge times are not impressive. 24 hours initially. Followed by 12 hours after full depletion after that. Though oddly, mine came both fully charged from the combination box/blister pack. Taking a close look, mine were both brand new. Definitely not refurbished. Unlike the E+Ready, you can toss in a handful of AA primary batteries into one of the radios to instantly get it working. Though you completely lose the water-proof function if you do that. Still, being able to use primaries is a big advantage that not every model of two-ways have. Not even some of the other better ones out there.

Unfortunately, you get the same issue of a housing for the excellent electronics being built to a clearly visible price-point. Though the plastic itself doesn't feel cheap. The latch for the battery cover/lower back portion of the radio's body definitely feels very cheap and flimsy. Oh so flimsy. Just odd that such an important part of the radio is built that way. If you can get a set for around $65.oo, it's a good buy. I paid a little more. Overall, I'm happy with it. The radios work well. The antenna is thick and definitely NOT flimsy.

Even if you're bugging out alone, it's a good idea to keep one with you in your BOB. You might need rescuing after you bug out. You might not get to your BOL, but manage to at least get far enough to be safe. Monitor the radio for transmissions. (Obviously don't respond to just any transmission you pick up.) And, if you hear transmissions from First Responders who are in the area; talk to them. Let them know you need help. Even one two-way radio can be very useful. If bugging out with a spouse, make sure they have a BOB; and each of you put one radio in your BOBs.

The two things I think are important in good two-way radios (other than quality) are water-proofness. Look for a rating of at least JIS4 somewhere on the packing of any two-way set you look at. And, the ability to use common primaries. Yes, the second one cancels out the first. But if it's not raining, and you need to communicate; you'll still have that option if the rechargeable battery pack is dead. There are variations of the GXT1000. If the flimsy latch breaks, screw it! Duct tape the battery cover in place. Once again, no issues with the technology inside the radios. But yeah, I'm personally done with buying Midland products.

Forget the E+Ready for your BOB. Before buying the Mildland GXT1000 take a serious look at the offerings from Uniden, and Motorola. (The better models in each of their line-ups.) I'm going to give the GXT1000 a conditional recommendation.

It's nice that the GXT1000 can pick up NOAA broadcasts. One thing though, if you go for the GXT1000, careful taking it and the accessories out of the entire packaging. I found the car charger stuffed inside the upper portion of the box/blister pack. Would have been very easy to toss it out without realizing it was in the packaging at all.
 
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Monocrom

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Good idea. We got an early snow storm in NYC that wasn't too bad.... unless you were out there early in the morning trying to drive home from work.

While I think I've already mentioned my collapseable snow-shovel with slightly narrower head I found at a car wash that lives in the trunk of my car. I know I haven't mentioned my long-handle ice-scrapper with built-in brush. Very cheap. Purchased last year at a surprisingly well-stocked gas station mini-mart near work. While I don't fuel up there since their ramps are far too steep. I do often walk there to use the mini-mart.

So yeah, add long-handle ice-scrapper w/ brush bristles to the list of needed items to be kept in a car. With it, took a handful of minutes to clean off my car. Without it, I likely would have easily been out there longer than half an hour trying to improvise something to get the job done.

Some say the bristles on such brushes leave micro scratches in the paint-job. Honestly, so what?! One, you can't see them. Two, if you have family obligations that include literally taking care of others; you need to drive in order to get to them. Do what's needed.

Stay tuned for a review of a locally available (in your area), no internet ordering needed, Emergency 2400 calorie food ration bar. Actually, more like "brick." Will post that in a few days.
 

jabe1

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Monochrome is right. I've been using a brush made for large vehicles for years. It takes a lot of time off your clean up.

Secondly, at home I have a Sno Brum on a broom handle which, once you use it, will change your whole view on automobile snow removal. Clean off the entire car in a few minutes, no scratches.
 

nbp

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Those sno brums look interesting. Do you prefer it to a brush? I have a long brush with scraper end in my car.
 

jabe1

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Sorry for the delay....
i do prefer it to a brush, although I leave it at home as my garage is full of everything except our cars!

i discovered it while working at a car dealership many years ago. It won't remove ice, but moves a great deal of snow quickly.
 
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