The long list of potentially useful stuff in bug out, SHTF, car kits, and more...

Monocrom

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First, let me recommend a book that helped me learn a lot about backpacking, which, is really kind of what we are talking about with a Get Home Bag or BOB.

51K9PQ93JRL._SX309_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
That book you mentioned looks interesting. I'll likely get a copy myself. Saw it being sold at a certain online shop I sometimes go to.

I have to be honest though, it's easy to mistake backpacking set-up, with a BOB, with a GHB (Get Home bag).

It's like three similar dragons but each just a bit different enough in mildly varying shades of green. One example: I'm starting to re-think the need for hunting in a Bug-out situation. You're trying to get from point A to your Safe Haven, point B in the fastest way possible. Even if you're on foot, is taking time to go hunting a productive use of ones time? In a BOB, you're likely going to have enough food and water to last you 3 days. You could realistically stretch it out to 4. The time spent hunting small game would be better spent running, driving, or just in general traveling to safety before the sun goes down.

When you're backpacking or hiking, you can take along a small game rifle. In a bug out, some sort of disaster has occurred. Likely not Armageddon. But I remember here in NY, when hurricane Sandy hit and the looters came out, many decent folks started arming themselves. The police were told to go out and arrest those civilians found to be carrying guns. In most cases, they were store-owners trying to protect their property. The police didn't care, and targeted anyone with a visible gun. Moving through an area, even a small game rifle slung over a shoulder is going to attract the wrong kind of attention during a bug out situation. Something like an Airweight (around 15 or 17 ounces) snubby, .38 Special rated for +P ammo pocket revolver in a coat pocket or an inside the waist-band holster is going to be reliable as well as go unseen until you need it. Something like an S&W 442, Ruger LCR, or the lightweight variation of the Taurus model 85.

Backpacking, you're just not likely to run into looters or desperate folks running to the woods completely unprepared for whatever disaster hit. Bug out scenario, both types of folks are going to around. For a Get Home bag.... You might run into one or the other type of person. Or, perhaps not. You might be the one going through the emergency yourself, or it might only affect one area that you're in. Thus, requiring you to at least get out of there while you try to Get Home.

The most important items in all three bags, varies. Easily for a Get Home bag the most important item is going to be cold hard cash that you keep in the bag. With a GHB, being safe could be as easy as hailing a cab and offering the driver a generous bribe.... er, "tip".... to get you home as fast as possible and NOT picking up other customers. You're not going to be able to do that during a bug out. Even if cabs are running, they're not going to stop to pick anyone up! And if you run into a stupid cabbie who does, he's not driving you about 70 miles to your Bug Out Location. Just not happening.

With backpacking, you're walking. In a Get Home scenario or a bug out one.... That's the absolute last thing you want to do. You might be forced to. But last option to be sure. Makes you more vulnerable out in the open... on foot. Now add being on foot during a bug out and having your family on foot with you, with a small child or two.

Out of all 3, bugging out is the scariest dragon. The GHB one can be scary but is mostly annoying most of the time. The backpacking one can occasionally be dangerous. But much of the time is actually fun and even downright friendly. Thing is, it's very easy to confuse one type for another. Especially a bug out scenario, often very little attention is paid to moving around in urban areas before you get to the woods. Either in a vehicle or on foot. On foot, the sewer is an excellent option. I've heard of an improvised tool that can pry manhole covers open. Just need to find the reference book in which that was described. (And damn I've got a lot of those.)

But yeah, similar; but unique challenges involved in all three. There's stuff in my GHB you won't find in my BOB, and vice versa. Home is only 10 miles away for me from work. My GHB will look very different than a guy who lives 35 miles away and commutes by public transportation into the city.
 
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Monocrom

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Hey guys, forgot I had the cover for Creek's book saved on my smartphone. Here's a pic. (Fox 40 Classic and Victorinox One-hand Trekker w/ plain-edged main blade; not included. ;))

 

Going_Supernova

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Hey guys, forgot I had the cover for Creek's book saved on my smartphone. Here's a pic. (Fox 40 Classic and Victorinox One-hand Trekker w/ plain-edged main blade; not included. ;))



I see you are located in NYC--that explains your obsession with bugging out. Good luck to you when the SHTF--I can't think of a much worse place to be.
 

Monocrom

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I see you are located in NYC--that explains your obsession with bugging out. Good luck to you when the SHTF--I can't think of a much worse place to be.


New Jersey.... Oh yeah, much worse.

I would say the entire state of Colorado, but then again with everyone being stoned; angry and aggressive looting might just be lower than usual in a bug out situation. :D
 

Monocrom

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Great points, Monocrom!

Thank you. I really wish I was wrong though. Only thing worse than the above is being forced to bug out with an elderly or disabled/crippled family member. A manual-push wheelchair becomes a must. For rougher terrain, yeah; it won't be dignified at all but a deer-cart might be best for hauling such a family member. And tapping on the door of not-so-family-friendly ideas, there are going to be some who'll choose to save only themselves or heathy and mobile family members. But yeah, we won't talk about that.

Can't fit them in a BOB, but a non-electric wheelchair and/or a deer-cart might just be two things to include if bugging out by vehicle is an option. Can't put either one in a BOB to take with you....

Speaking of which, the more I think about it, the more a traditional rifle or shotgun starts looking like a bad idea to include in a Bug Out vehicle set-up. If anything happens to it, a person would have to hoof it. Do you bring the extra long guns with you? Can't conceal them on you or in your BOB. Not good! Only other option is leave them behind or bury them out in the woods. No one wants to imagine the horror of looters or gangs finding the weapons and using them against other innocent people.

I'm liking the AR-7 option and a good snubby small-frame revolver more and more. At least an AR-7 can be broken down and hidden in a BOB.

Your post just got me thinking about more realistic scenarios during a bug out.
 

blah9

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Yeah that would be difficult to help those of us in poor health bug out for sure. It's a really sad sounding situation so hopefully it won't ever come to that but it's good to think about these things. If the person isn't too heavy then a bike trailer might be possible, but that would still get very tiring fast. And then you're stuck bringing a bike in your bug out vehicle until you need to bail out too. Then again that might be really useful to have anyway.
 

pblanch

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Has anyone thought of the Soylent meal replacement packets for food. I have never seen them for 3 days supply food supply.
 

blah9

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Has anyone thought of the Soylent meal replacement packets for food. I have never seen them for 3 days supply food supply.

Yeah that might not be too bad of an idea. I thought of that before but have never tried one.
 

reppans

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Yes, poncho/tent, Tyvek ground sheet, and 6 Ti stakes are in there ~1 lb.
 

blah9

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Wow, pretty awesome gear. Thanks for sharing the pictures.
 

Monocrom

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Yeah that would be difficult to help those of us in poor health bug out for sure. It's a really sad sounding situation so hopefully it won't ever come to that but it's good to think about these things. If the person isn't too heavy then a bike trailer might be possible, but that would still get very tiring fast. And then you're stuck bringing a bike in your bug out vehicle until you need to bail out too. Then again that might be really useful to have anyway.


I've heard of bicycles being used as back-up BOVs (Bug Out Vehicles). But as you pointed out, far from ideal.

Edit:

Regarding soylent meals....


Main thing is trying them out to see if one can stomach them before having to rely on them after bugging out. I remember the very first and last time mom convinced me to try Soy milk (obviously not the same thing). I nearly vomited after a couple of gulps. Though clearly, some folks are fine with it.

Another option is packing your own MRE. I've done that a couple of times. The philosophy being both nutrition as well as a psychological advantage. Pack items with long shelf-lives. You don't even need a vacuum sealer (though it would definitely help)! Psychologically speaking, bugging out is more of a traumatic event rather than an exciting adventure. Your morale is guaranteed to be low. Old, familiar eats, will raise your morale. Or at least keep it from getting too low. (Just be sure to rotate the homemade MRE contents out far more often than you would traditional MREs.) Those soylent meals might be too pragmatic for inclusion in a BOB.

One last advantage of a homemade MRE is that it takes into account any special diet one may have. Too much salt in your system? Pack foods low in salt/sodium. Diabetic? Pack foods with low sugar content. And so on.

However, if space is at a premium, another option is Datrex 2400 calorie emergency rations. Basically the size of half a brick or so. Vacuum sealed. You don't have to consume the contents immediately, but they'll stay fresh for only a few days after cracked open the first time.

For homemade MREs:

The following vid. was a big help when I first made my own a few years back....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HusMTBaspPM
 
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Going_Supernova

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Got a Stanley Adventure Series Camp Cook Set and GSI Glacier stainless Ketalist delivered yesterday. Now I have something to cook with on my backpacking stoves (MSR Pocket Rocket and Dragonfly, Sterno stove, Coleman Sportster and US Army Coleman single burner propane stove). I think the Ketalist is probably big enough to use on the double burner Coleman stoves, but I'm not so sure about the Stanley. I'm going to have fun playing with them for awhile before putting them in my kits--making hot chocolate and ramen noodles, etc.

So, what's in your kit's kitchen? :D
 

reppans

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... And then you're stuck bringing a bike in your bug out vehicle until you need to bail out too. Then again that might be really useful to have anyway .

I've heard as bicycles being used as back-up BOVs (Bug Out Vehicles). But as you pointed out, far from ideal.

I have a Class B campervan and always keep a folding bike, or two, under the bed - love spontaneous exploration with bicycles while road touring, and the only good bicycle is the one you happen to have with you. This combo makes a rather nice BOV and BBOV, of course, but if things were to get really bad, I would expect to have to ditch both (everyone will want your bicycle). In that case, my BBBOV (Back-up, Back-up, BOV) would be THIS - only ~half as efficient as a bicycle on the road, but much more capable for serious bushwacking.


Links to where it could be found? It would be appreciated.

Here you go - Gatewood Cape. In addition to being a tent and rain poncho, in a pinch, I've also used it as an insulating down jacket. Suggest the integral Serenity NetTent if intending to use it as backpacking tent.
 

blah9

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Ah, I didn't even think of rollerblades. It's been years since I've tried them but that's not a bad idea on the road.
 

pblanch

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Mar 22, 2011
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Soylent doesn't contain any soy (as in the plant source). It derives most of its protein from Whey proteins which are dairy based.

Well at least the product I have tried. Tastes fine and for 3 days worth is fine to survive to live on.
 

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