Things I've learned the hard way . . .(Part 2)

KITROBASKIN

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After an animal who is part of the family departs, one expects them to be there when returning home, but they are no longer; so sad.

Having worked at a vet clinic one summer and helped friends with their loved animals at life’s end, it seems the pet tells us it is time for them to go, hopefully we are open to heed the message. That does not make it any easier.

For a couple weeks after a wonderful dog told me it was time, I would carry her outside to relieve herself. But when she couldn’t even stand without me holding her up to pee, that was when I chose for her end to happen.

Any Quality of Life is gone? It’s time. Lessening suffering is something we humans should do. Are there any other species that chooses to do that?
 

bykfixer

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I chose to put down my buddy Onyx recently and I questioned the decision for several days after. See, his back legs were showing signs of failing. I did short walks with him twice daily and saw progress. Lots of progress. In the meantime his appetite was greatly reduced. Now this was a dog that attacked his daily food like a puppy every day. I don't mean attack like snarling, but like "heck yeah this is the best food everrrrrrrrr"……every time.

One afternoon when I arrived home he could not stand up. In like 3 weeks he had gone from a happy to a saddened demeaner. We took him to a vet expecting not to bring him back home. The vets assistant fed him lasagne until he was full and he went off to a better place. Turns out his spine was ate up with uncle aurthor and he'd been hiding it like dogs do. He had a fever and an erratic heartbeat. I could have kept him on pills or had the doc perform surgeries or who knows what.

As sad as it was it was better in my view to let him go knowing he had a full belly and fell asleep. It still sucks, but had I known he had the arthritis I would have probably done it sooner.
 
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Poppy

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ah, Mr
I chose to put down my buddy Onyx recently and I questioned the decision for several days after. See, his back legs were showing signs of failing. I did short walks with him twice daily and saw progress. Lots of progress. In the meantime his appetite was greatly reduced. Now this was a dog that attacked his daily food like a puppy every day. I don't mean attack like snarling, but like "heck yeah this is the best food everrrrrrrrr"……every time.

One afternoon when I arrived home he could not stand up. In like 3 weeks he had gone from a happy to a saddened demeaner. We took him to a vet expecting not to bring him back home. The vets assistant fed him lasagne until he was full and he went off to a better place. Turns out his spine was ate up with uncle aurthor and he'd been hiding it like dogs do. He had a fever and an erratic heartbeat. I could have kept him on pills or had the doc perform surgeries or who knows what.

As sad as it was it was better in my view to let him go knowing he had a full belly and fell asleep. It still sucks, but had I known he had the arthritis I would have probably done it sooner.

Yeah, Mr. Fixer, no matter what, it just sux. You did the right thing. Don't second guess yourself.

I guess it was a year ago, we put down our little 7 year old terrier. She had liver cancer. Everyone said goodbye, except me. I knew I wouldn't be able to say the words without crying. I hate crying, so I stayed silent.

Drugs are a wonderful thing in that they can bring about the end of life gracefully, peacefully.
 

PhotonWrangler

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I chose to put down my buddy Onyx recently and I questioned the decision for several days after. See, his back legs were showing signs of failing. I did short walks with him twice daily and saw progress. Lots of progress. In the meantime his appetite was greatly reduced. Now this was a dog that attacked his daily food like a puppy every day. I don't mean attack like snarling, but like "heck yeah this is the best food everrrrrrrrr"……every time.

One afternoon when I arrived home he could not stand up. In like 3 weeks he had gone from a happy to a saddened demeaner. We took him to a vet expecting not to bring him back home. The vets assistant fed him lasagne until he was full and he went off to a better place. Turns out his spine was ate up with uncle aurthor and he'd been hiding it like dogs do. He had a fever and an erratic heartbeat. I could have kept him on pills or had the doc perform surgeries or who knows what.

As sad as it was it was better in my view to let him go knowing he had a full belly and fell asleep. It still sucks, but had I known he had the arthritis I would have probably done it sooner.
I'm sorry for your loss bykfixer. It sounds like you've done the right thing though.
 

bykfixer

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Like others said bringing in a pet is taking a chance on heart ache.
We had taken in Onyx at 7 months old from a bad situation and for about a year was a real pest. Then one day he stopped acting so crazy. At first he didn't like men. Men with a ballcap even less and with glasses, forget about it. I wear glasses and a ball cap so we had our moments.

At about a year and a half he wrecked a knee so while on a furlough from work I built a handicap ramp out back, got him a bionic tendon installed and became his physical therapist. The vet said his other would go too so I kept the ramp in place.

He went from snarling at me when I arrived home to happy to see me. The Mrs was a dog trainer and taught him how tricks like the shell game where you follow the dog treat in a cup as it is shuffled, how to read simple signs like 2+2= and he'd bark 4 times for a dog treat. Oh, and "bang bang you're dead" where he'd fall over and roll onto his back.

He never tugged on the leash and insisted to walk to my left. And his last couple of years was losing his hearing, and sight. He lived about 50 years worth of life all squeezed into 12 and we feel blessed to have had the pleasure of his companionship while he was with us.
B912F8C0-AB1B-4A51-8EF8-17B04253C086.jpeg

This was Onyx personified


The thing I'm learning the hard way is raising an 8 week old lab at 58 years old.
3234FE9C-8642-4B4F-A42A-7F400F6C669E.jpeg

Here's the new kid "what ya got next for me to do old man?"
 

idleprocess

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I could have kept him on pills or had the doc perform surgeries or who knows what.
I was at that stage. Tried some medications that helped but the improvement was a matter of degree and ultimately they were ... gone ... anyway. The weight loss clinched it - caloric intake was perhaps a third minimum necessary despite much effort to present palatable food, leaving no margin for future procedures thus I had to make the call.
 

desert.snake

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Very useful topic, just finished reading. I think it would be possible to combine this into something like a brochure and save a couple of copies for posterity. We used to publish a book on home economics in the 50s, with a bunch of useful tips, very similar to this topic, but some cases are not described there. There are also no instructions and examples in interpersonal relationships, here they are exist and it is very useful.

As for the bad experience - if there are any injuries that don't seem serious, it's best to get checked out by 1 or more independent doctors, and also don't blindly trust the doctors from public free hospitals.

Here are 3 cases:

1) 6 years ago my friend 62 years old stumbled on the ice on the steps and fell to his knee, he stopped the fall with his hand. His hand hurt quite a lot and he could not raise it above the level of his heart. The doctor decided that it was just a bruise and prescribed a fixation of the hand. But the problem with raising his arm was not resolved, and severe pains began in his shoulder and neck. This time the doctor decided that the friend had a pinched nerve and he needed to rub the ointment and periodically give painkillers. A year passed, the pain became unbearable, then a friend went for an MRI and it turned out that he had a torn ligament, his shoulder dropped and the ligaments healed in this wrong position, now the muscle simply does not have enough length to raise his arm. And had to either live with it further, or have an operation to cut out excess tissue, but it is very expensive, so now a friend can hardly do anything with this hand. And so it lives.

2) 3 years ago my friend's wife (friend from case #1) fell on the steps of the shop stairs (it was winter, the stairs were covered with very smooth ceramic tiles). She dislocated her leg, the doctor prescribed fixation of the leg in a cast, so she lived for about 2 months. When the plaster was removed, she got up and fell down, a second examination showed that initially it was not a dislocation, it was a dislocation + rupture of the ligament. A ligament with a piece of bone just dangled under the skin. She underwent surgery, but not very successfully, now she is limping and cannot walk without a cane, and she cannot squat either. More precisely, she can sit down 1 time and then she will need help.

3) 6 days ago my pianist friend fell down the stairs. She fell on her shoulder and it hurt a lot. The doctor in the state hospital looked with his eyes, felt with his hand and said - there is no fracture, this is not our competence, apply a bandage and do not touch for 3 weeks. I suspected that the level of pain did not match his statement, so I forced a friend to undergo an MRI, it took 4 days to persuade. The result is:
"Rupture of the structures of the rotator interval (rupture of the articular capsule, articular ligaments of the middle and lower humeroscapular ligaments), reactive synovitis with leakage into the subcoracoid space. Osteochondral damage to the outer upper posterior parts of the head of the humerus - by the type of Hill-Sachs fracture; damage to the anterior sections of the articular lip, anterior sections of the bone part of the articular cavity of the articular process of the scapula - according to the type of Bankart fracture."
If it had been left to heal itself, as the first doctor advised, it could have ended badly for the pianist's career. I found a clinic where athletes are treated for injuries, now we will treat them well (and expensively). Joint surgery may be required.

4 more conclusions can be drawn from this:

- Must be very careful when descending stairs, or other inclined surfaces.

- No need to rush anywhere.

- Need good shoes, comfortable and with the right grip.

- In the current situation (which is unlikely to change in the next 50 years), it is necessary in advance to save money for the treatment of such injuries and other things (teeth, cancer, etc.)
 

ledbetter

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I think doctors are great and generally trustworthy. I appreciate all the hard work, dedication, and ten years of university education and training that goes into their profession. Do they make mistakes? Of course. I almost died from undiagnosed appendicitis and it burst on the third visit. So basically they almost killed me then they cured me.
Second or third opinions if possible are definitely a good idea. Even then s*** happens.
 
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