Thrunite TN40 (4xXP-L HI, rechargeable battery pack) Review: BEAMSHOTS and more!

selfbuilt

selfbuilt

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Reviewer's Note: I am very backlogged with lights, so expect somewhat less detail than typical in my upcoming reviews.

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The TN40 is the latest member in the high-output TN line of flashlights from Thrunite, featuring in this case 4x XP-L HI emitters for maximum throw. Unlike other recent TN models, this one has a custom battery pack (7.2V/6800mAh) with built-in charger. Let's see how it compares to other lights in this high output class … :whistle:

Manufacturer/Dealer Reported Specifications:
(note: as always, these are simply what the dealer/manufacturer provides – scroll down to see my actual testing results).

  • LED: 4xCREE XP-L HI LED
  • Runs on: ThruNite Li-ion battery pack (7.2V/6800mAh).
  • Working voltage: 5V-9V.
  • Charging current/voltage: 7.4V, 3.5A.
  • Output & Runtime (Tested with ThruNite 7.2V/6800mAh Li-ion battery pack and for CW. NW parameters is 10% off): Strobe(1100 lumens /9hrs), Turbo(4450 lumens/85mins), High(1780 lumens /2.7hrs), Medium(580 lumens /9.5hrs), Low(90 lumens /2.5days), Firefly (1.2 lumens /57days).
  • Peak beam intensity: 331200cd.
  • Max beam distance: 1151m.
  • Power interface: 1 * DC 5.5 charging port.
  • Special Functions: One momentary-on "forward clicky" tactical side switch, and double click to turbo and then strobe Mode.
  • Battery Pack Advantage
  • More Efficiency: Each of the battery was precisely picked in order to keep each one of them to similar feature. If different batteries were using mixed, the difference will lead the lack of Max output of the flashlight. Hugh amount of resistance will occur while using strings to connect batteries. The higher resistance causes the lower efficiency of batteries.
  • Charging faster: The battery package was charging with 8.4V 3.5A high power adopter, it only took 2.8 hours to reach full-charged. However, most of the 18650 charger is 1A output, full charge of 4 * 18650 batteries will take 4 hours.
  • Easier to use: Battery package was charging at the same time, which could ensure that each of the battery would be full charged at same time. However, if there is any wrong operation when use 18650 battery charger, it might cause some of the batteries uncharged. It only takes seconds to plug in the charger cable of TN40. Saving more time.
  • Safer: It is very high risk to using different type of batteries together, which may cause explosion for that different voltage, different mAh and different resistance may cause the batteries heat inhomogeneous.
  • Lens: Anti-reflective coated ultra-clear toughened glass lens
  • Smooth Reflector
  • Material: AL T6061-T6, Premium type III hard-anodized
  • Waterproof to IPX-8 Standard (2 meters).
  • Impact resistant: 1.0 meter.
  • Working Temperature: -40℃-80℃.
  • Dimensions: 173mm (length) x 100mm x 52mm.
  • Weight: 785g (including battery).
  • Accessories: Shoulder strap*1, Strap ring*1, AC/DC Adapter*1, Spare O-ring*2, Side switch Cap*1, Tail switch Cap*1, Anti-dust plug*1
  • MSRP: ~$260
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Packaging is the standard hard cardboard box from Thrunite, with packing foam inside. Included with the light are several spare O-rings, shoulder strap, AC/DC adapter, spare side switch cap, spare tail indicator cap, and spare dust cover. A very limited manual was included on mine (but Thrunite did send me an electronic spec sheet with instructions).

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All dimensions directly measured, and given with no batteries installed (unless indicated):

Thrunite TN40: Weight (with battery pack): 780.0g, Length: 171mm, Width (bezel): 100.1mm
Thrunite TN36: Weight: 390.4g, Length: 125.4mm, Width (bezel): 64.0mm
Thrunite TN35 (MT-G2): Weight: 571.4g (723g with 3x18650), Length: 201mm, Width (bezel): 78.9mm

Acebeam K70: Weight: 584.6g, Length: 204mm, Width (bezel): 88.1mm
Eagletac SX25L3 3x18650: Weight: 315.9g, Length: 150.2mm, Weight (bezel): 47.0mm
Fenix TK75: Weight: 516.0g (700g with 4x18650), Length: 184mm, Width (bezel): 87.5mm
Nitecore TM11: Weight: 342.6g (476g with 8xCR123A), Length 135.3mm, Width (bezel): 59.5mm
Niwalker MM15: Weight: 333.7g (without handle), 355.9g (with handle), (539g with 4x18650 and handle), Length: 114.6mm, Weight (bezel): 63.7mm
Niwalker MM18: Weight: 510.g (without handle), 534.1g (with handle), Lenth: 135.3mm, Width (bezel): 73.9mm

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The TN40 is relatively compact for such a high-output "throwy" light. The head/bezel is a quite a bit wider than most members of this compact multi-emitter class. Anodizing is a flat black, and is in excellent shape on my sample. Body labels are very minimal, and clear. Knurling on the body handle is aggressive, which definitely helps with grip. There are a number of attachment points for a shoulder strap or wrist lanyard. The light can tailstand stably.

Screw threads are square-cut. Threads are anodized, so the light can be easily locked out by twist of the head.

The TN40 uses a single side-mounted electronic switch to control on/off and mode switching. Switch feel is about typical, and there is a definite "click" when making full contact. Scroll down for a discussion of the user interface.

As mentioned above, the light uses a custom battery pack of 7.2V/6800mAh – which is the equivalent of 4x18650 in a 2s2p arrangement. While some may regret the inability to use your own cells, at least everything is well matched and regulated here. The light comes with a rapid 3.5A AC/DC charger.

Total charging time is reported as 2.8 hrs, which seems accurate in my testing (i.e., the indicator on the charging brick turned from red to green in under 3 hours on each of my charging runs). Click the tail switch during charging for an LED indicator of charging status (with <10% as red,
10%-25% as flashing red, 25-50% as purple, and 50-100% as blue).

For checking the battery capacity when off, simply press the tail switch. The switch LED will indicate battery status (with <20% shown as flashing red, 25%-50% as flashing purple, 50-95% as flashing blue, and 96-100%, as constant blue). Note that charging will not initiate until you have <95% charge status.

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The TN40 is distinctive for its use of four XP-L HI emitters, located in rather wide and smooth reflector wells.

This head design and choice of emitter is clearly optimized to produce very good throw. Scroll down for beamshot comparisons to other recent high-output lights.

User Interface

Click the side switch to turn the light on/off.

When the light is on, press-and-hold the side switch to cycle through Low > Medium > High, in a repeating loop. The light has mode memory and remembers your choice.

To access Turbo, from any mode, double-click the switch. To access Strobe, double-click again from Turbo.

To access Firefly, from Off, press-and-hold the switch. Note that Turbo, Strobe and Firefly are not on the main sequence.

From Off, the light will turn on is the last memorized mode (except for Firefly, Turbo, and Strobe).

Thrunite reports that the light will automatically lower the output when the internal temperature of the driver rises to 80 degrees C.

Video:

For more information on the overall build and user interface, please see my new video overview:



As with all my videos, I recommend you have annotations turned on. I commonly update the commentary with additional information or clarifications before publicly releasing the video.

PWM/Strobe

TN40-Med.gif


There is no sign of PWM that I can see, at any output level – the TN40 is fully current-controlled. :)

Strobe:
TN40-Strobe.gif


Strobe was a typical fast tactical strobe of 13Hz.

Standby Drain

A standby current drain is inevitable on the TN40, due to the electronic switch in the head. After an initial ~0.6mA connection current, the standby drain drops to a sustained 38.5uA. That would mean that the 6800mAh pack would be fully drained in a little over 20 years (theoretically). :rolleyes: Since this is below the self-discharge rate of Li-ion, it is not at all a concern.

Note that you can easily break this current by unscrewing the head slightly, thanks to the anodized threads. I recommend you do for this for lowering the risk of accidental activation – it certainly is not necessary from a current drain perspective.

Beamshots:

All lights are on protected 18650 ICR chemistry batteries, except for the TN40 which is on its custom cells. Lights are about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall).

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It is always hard to compare high output lights at this ridiculously close distance. :rolleyes: But a few general observations present themselves.

First, the TN40 is indeed very throwy – it has incredibly focused output for a 4x emitter setup. Overall output is surprisingly high as well (although not as high as the 3xMK-R TN36). There are also a number of artifacts in the TN40 spillbeam (due to the overlapping well design), but these are hard to see above. To tell more, you really need to move outdoors.

For outdoor shots, these are done in the style of my earlier 100-yard round-up review. Please see that thread for a discussion of the topography (i.e. the road dips in the distance, to better show you the corona in the mid-ground). Note there are a lot of bugs out at this time of year, so expect to see some flight trails. ;)

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For peak beam distance, you can see than the TN40 falls more in line with the thrower group (XHP35 K70 and XM-L2 dedome K50vn) than it does the usual high-output group (XHP70-based K60 and SD75). This is an incredible amount of throw for a multi-emitter light – while still maintaining a lot of overall output. Scroll down for direct beam measurements.

Testing Method:

All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, as described on my flashlightreviews.ca website. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

I have devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lightbox values to Lumens thread for more info.

Throw/Output Summary Chart:

My summary tables are reported in a manner consistent with the ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.flashlightreviews.ca/FL1.htm for a discussion, and a description of all the terms used in these tables. Effective July 2012, I have updated all my Peak Intensity/Beam Distance measures with a NIST-certified Extech EA31 lightmeter (orange highlights).

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As predicted by the beamshots, the TN40 is an incredible thrower. Among my 4x18650-class lights, only the single-emitter XHP35 Acebeam K70 out-throws it (but with less output overall). This is an incredibly strong showing for a 4xXP-L light. :eek:oo:

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Now there's something you don't see very often – my output measures on Hi actually exceed the reported specs. :laughing: Most of the other levels seem pretty accurate, in contrast.

Output/Runtime Graphs:

As always, my standard runtimes are done under a cooling fan.

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The light shows a series of step-downs on Turbo, and consistently flat-stabilized runs at Hi and Med levels.

On initial glance, the Hi mode runtime results support my output measures above (i.e., I get higher output but lower runtime than reported in the specs). Of course, those specs are not likely based on fan-cooled runtimes. Given the thermal regulating feature of this light, you could expect longer runtime (at reduced output) without external cooling. To see the effect of heat on throttling output better, let's see what happens if I don't use a cooling fan:

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As expected, output drops sooner when no external cooling is applied. Max runtime is still lower than spec though, consistent with the greater output I am detecting here.

Potential Issues:

The light uses a temperature-mediated step down on Turbo, but I still find it gets very hot with sustained runtime on Turbo.

A custom built-in battery pack is provided, and the user cannot substitute 18650 cells. Performance of the pack is consistent with good quality 18650s (i.e., 4x 3400mAh cells, arranged 2s2p). The bundled fast charger will fully charge the battery pack in under 3 hours.

In keeping with the incredibly high throw (and deep multi-well reflector design), there are noticeable beam artifacts in the periphery of the spillbeam. But this light does have the greatest throw I've ever seen for a multi-emitter light.

Due to the electronic switch in the head, the light has a stand-by current when the battery pack is connected. But this is completely negligible, and not a concern. To prevent accidental activation though, I recommend you lock the light out by a simple twist of the head.

Preliminary Observations

The TN40 is an outstanding thrower – one of the furthest throwing I've ever tested, in fact. This is remarkable when you consider it actually has 4 emitters in there (XP-L HI). :eek:oo:

Following up on the maximum flood TN36 model, this further broadens the Thrunite line of relatively compact, modern high-output lights. The interface is a little different now, with Turbo and Firefly off the main sequence (available as a double-click and press-hold-from-off, respectively). But it is otherwise quite intuitive and easy to use.

Like the TN36, there is a thermal sensor mediated step-down that reduces output when run at the highest levels. I only noticed it kicking in on the Turbo runs (but of course, all my runtimes are done under a cooling fan). I don't find the TN40 gets as hot in operation, and the light seems to do repeated step-downs now as it warms up.

I know some users won't like the custom battery pack idea, but its performance is consistent with current top-of-the-line 4x3400mAh 18650 batteries. And Thrunite does provide an incredibly fast in-light AC charger (3.5A, fully charges the pack in under 3 hours). Regulation and output/runtime efficiency were excellent for this class. :)

In terms of beam profile, the TN40 is knock-out thrower. I knew this early on in testing, as I found the reflected hotspot too bright to look at on the walls of my house. :cool: But the beam intensity measures and outdoor shots really show the performance. They have done an incredible job on the reflector, which is shallower than I would have expected. That said, expect considerable spillbeam edge artifacts, due to the overlapping wells. I'm glad to see they are offering this light in both CW and NW (CW tested here). :thumbsup:

Fans of throw will find much to like here. While some recent XHP35 lights can out-throw it (e.g., the Acebeam K70), the TN40 has an outstanding level of overall output (closing in on ~5000 lumens on my sample). Coupled with a reasonably compact build, serviceable user interface, and hassle-free battery pack/charger, I expect this light will garner a lot of interest. :wave:

----

TN40 was supplied by Thrunite for review.
 
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Blue Steel

Blue Steel

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Fantastic review, as always. Thank you.
 
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moldyoldy

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A wonderful review! => Thank you Selfbuilt!

The beam of the TN40 is much more useful for me with a decent spill than many of the competitive high-output 'throwers'. Given that the price includes 4 matched cells with a fast charger, the price-point is well chosen. I am not bothered by a 'custom' battery pack given the likely high-current demands of the TN40 and since the battery pack ensures easy/obvious charging by any of my relatives. The outside design of this light is analogous to the TN35, but noticeably shorter and handier than the TN35 (which I had), in spite of the 4 LEDS and consequential larger reflector in the TN40. This light would satisfy my latent need, er, want, for a high-output thrower with a field-practical beam. Thanks!!
 
Capolini

Capolini

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Thanks for the review. Looks like an awesome light. I just am not a fan of the proprietary battery pack! I do not own any and always prefer to put my batteries in instead of depending on the manufacturer! Other than that these stock lights over the last year or so that are using HI LEDS are almost as impressive as a modded version would be!

As your editor[!] I always seem to notice mistakes that we all can make! Right after the photos of the aforementioned battery pack a small glitch mentioning the TN36 my mistake.

"The TN36 uses a single side-mounted electronic switch to control on/off and mode switching."

Thanks again for the comprehensive review! :thumbsup:
 
Skeeterg

Skeeterg

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Well done,love the oversized head on this light. It's so odd looking its cool.
 
selfbuilt

selfbuilt

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The beam of the TN40 is much more useful for me with a decent spill than many of the competitive high-output 'throwers'. ... This light would satisfy my latent need, er, want, for a high-output thrower with a field-practical beam. Thanks!!
Well said. I too find this to be a great beam, with tons of bright spill along with unbelievable throw. I was blown away at how well it lit up the foreground, midground and distance at 100 yards. But as the beamshots show, my standard camera settings are going to need to be be reconsidered - I'm either going to have to shorten the exposure time, or take shots at a greater distance, LOL.

Seriously though, we are getting into the territory where it is hard to justify why we would really need such a light. It was like turning my beamshot location into day!

I just am not a fan of the proprietary battery pack! .. Other than that these stock lights over the last year or so that are using HI LEDS are almost as impressive as a modded version would be!
Yes, I am really impressed with what all these new High Intensity emitters are putting out (the XHP35 HI as well). I personally don't have an issue with the battery pack - if nothing else, it helps when loaning or giving the light to a friend/family member, whom I wouldn't trust with matching cells.

And thanks for the typo catch, fixed. :)

Well done,love the oversized head on this light. It's so odd looking its cool.
Yeah, it has a real "snubby" appearance that is kind of endearing for some reason. :laughing:
 
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richbuff

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Omg, I want to have this light to round out my nascent collection.

It is so nice to see your reviews for the big lights.

I think the industry should spend the money to employ you and/or others to produce your level of reviews for most all of the salient flashlights as they are released.

Thanks again for you classy and classic reviews.
 
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birderbill

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I may have missed this in the review but this light comes in both Cool White and Neutral White flavors. Have a TN40NW incoming.
 
Swede74

Swede74

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Seriously though, we are getting into the territory where it is hard to justify why we would really need such a light. It was like turning my beamshot location into day!

As high output lights become ever more powerful, readily available and somewhat affordable, it does not seem too far-fetched that we will soon be seeing new laws that regulate the use of the brightest beasts. Perhaps we are also getting into the territory where we will have to justify why we would need to have such a light, at least in public places.

In terms of beam profile, the TN40 is knock-out thrower. I knew this early on in testing, as I found the reflected hotspot too bright to look at on the walls of my house. :cool:

Taking the beam pattern portion of the video in your office must have been a bit of a challenge.:laughing:
 
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moldyoldy

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As high output lights become ever more powerful, readily available and somewhat affordable, it does not seem too far-fetched that we will soon be seeing new laws that regulate the use of the brightest beasts. Perhaps we are also getting into the territory where we will have to justify why we would need to have such a light, at least in public places. <snip>

Actually, not to divert this thread from an excellent review, but the high-output of the TN40 indirectly brings up a point to which I have been increasingly sensitized as the power of flashaholic lights has increased.

I believe that we all understand that the spot of a beam from a 1000+ lumen light is rather inimical to friendly relations. However, the spill from such lights is also increasing, especially from 'flooders' - and becoming bothersome by itself. Acknowledged that most of us use our lights at relatively lower levels for evening walks, with an occasional level bump-up for some movement in the woods.

On my occasional nightly walks on a road in a poorly-lit wooded suburban area, to ensure that I am seen by drivers, I more or less point my light downwards at the road for passing vehicles. However I have noticed that based on how much the drivers slow down, they are evidently bothered by just the spill from at least some of my lights (I rotate usage), even at very moderate output levels. The spill light from 'flooders' seems to be more of a problem. By comparison, most evening walkers use a rather weak output flashlight, if they carry any light at all. Some of the runners use a headlight pointed downwards. The spill from either of those 'consumer' light types would not represent a difficulty for drivers - who often drive past too fast anyway.

My conclusion is that in the US, in wooded areas with houses, I will have to adopt my same pattern of usage as in Germany. During my evening walks along the Main-Donau Kanal near Nürnberg, I allow only a relatively low level of light pointed down on the path near me. If I sense a movement in the trees, I have to consider what is behind the trees before I bump up the output.
 
CelticCross74

CelticCross74

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I just do not think mankind is ready for this beastly of a non HID light. That being said, voltage meter should have been kept at the head switch via TN4A style dont have to stop and check the rear. I am in no way a fan of most battery packs. Amazing light though. To much power and throw for my neighborhood though. My neighbor is a cop that works odd hours and does NOT like me playing with "those damn things" it makes him think theres a cop combing through yards. Yes sir. I take my light fun elsewhere
 
Capolini

Capolini

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This kind of light is definitely one that should not be used strolling down ones neighborhood,at least not on max output!

Every light I use on the trail is modded.Some equal this in overall lumens and I have several that surpass this in Throw. I use them on MAX output most of the time. I do not see too many people on the trail at night...........I see much more wildlife than people. If I do see a person I can recognize them from hundreds of yards away,especially if they have a light, then I simply turn down the light!

So there is a place for lights like these, you just have to know where to properly use them! :cool:
 
CelticCross74

CelticCross74

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only place I can use my big throwers are along the Potomac at night and if I go out to the countryside from time to time.
 
Capolini

Capolini

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That is where I am fortunate.

Philly is 30 miles away,where I live I just have to drive a few miles and I have tons of hiking trails[all wooded] along rivers or creeks where CAPO and I go every night. This last month has been rough on the poor guy,,80F TO 84F and humid when we start after sun set!:sigh:
 
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moldyoldy

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an fyi to identify my lights with a lot of spill or those flooders that seem to bother drivers the most: any ZL Floody lens headlights; and the LD75C using the white 200 lumen flood LED. I assume that any of the other 3 floody colors on the LD75C would bother drivers as well, much less the flashing red/blue LEDs in the LD75C which would be illegal in/on a vehicle. frankly any flood/spill light is too easily misdirected.


Back to the TN40: Thanks to Selfbuilt's review, I like the relatively compact size and beam pattern + throw of the TN40 and will order it. The TN40 is practical for at least a couple of my relatives exactly because of the battery pack with simple charging - plug it in quick charge with no handling of separate cells. Either of my nephews have the location to run the TN40 up to full power and range, either at their river homes or especially on the 60+ acre hobby farm with lots of deer and other critters running around.

of course, when in low-light-pollution areas, it is often nice to shut off any light and just star-gaze. The Milky Way in all of it's starry glory from horizon to horizon is something city dwellers rarely have a chance to see in person. ... yup, I'm getting old ...
 
selfbuilt

selfbuilt

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Interesting points raised here, regarding the need/use of these lights (in both urban and rural settings). It does seem to me like we have reached a point where it is hard to justify this level of output and throw (beyond the "wow" factor). I certainly wouldn't consider using these lights around other people (except at very low levels). The HID analogy is apt.

I'm increasingly worried someone is going to spot the lights at a distance when I'm doing my outdoor beamshots, and call the cops ("bring ID" my wife always reminds me before I head for these). I did once drive by a squad car on my way home (who seemed to be heading to my previous location, making me wonder). She's also waiting for the day the local media reports UFO groupies have descended on my location, looking for the mysterious lights. :laughing:
 
selfbuilt

selfbuilt

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Is there any way the charging cable can be adapted to plug into a 12v car outlet?
I'll leave the charging mod question to those with more experience of such matters, but I would suggest you check with Thrunite to see what they say about offering a 12V charging option.
 
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