TrustFire TR-J1

Wurkkos

Blindeye

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Just picked up the TrustFire TR-J1 off the 'bay.
Came with 2 UltraFire 18650 batteries (2400 mAhr), and a charger. About $45 total with shipping.

Took it diving in the Gulf yesterday: 85 feet, on an old airplane that fell off a carrier deck in a hurricane (looks like a Hellcat but is badly corroded).
Great illumination for a cheap, small light. Perfect for finding shovelnose lobster in the wreck and holes.

It needs a velcro holster to keep it on your BC; shouldn't be hard to make or find.
No where near the 1000 lumens claimed, but good light nonetheless.
A very blue/white light on land, but in the Gulf, with visibility at 35 feet, it had a faint purplish hue.

No signs of leak; I was at the bottom about 30 minutes.
Don't know the total run time on a charge; I only used it for about 15 minutes.

G.
 

Doc Ed

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Thank you for this review. I've been searching for one as well prior to buying one off eBay, and purchased one nonetheless. I'll give my input as well when I get my light.
 

Blindeye

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Thanks Doc.

Yes, can't beat it as a back up light, and small enough to stash on your BC for the light you never thought you'd need.
I wouldn't pick it as a primary dive light, but at that price I don't think you can go too wrong.

G.
 

Doc Ed

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Actually, my current primary is an XML based light in a Ferei BL09 head with a similar head diameter and my back-up is a Ferei W150 XPG light. I really like their build quality and am looking forward to comparing them with the TR-J1. I'd also like to test their claims of 100m (variably listed as 30m on some sites) - though I'll probably only test it to around 50-60m in my pressure pot. Do you have any beamshots?
 

Doc Ed

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Blindeye, I hope you don't mind me adding my input to your review.

CONSTRUCTION:

I Got mine in the mail today :D First impressions: Seemed relatively well built - nice and solid. On removing the head, there were one or two swarfs, but otherwise it looked great. The cooling ridges on the head are not overly-done as seen on some other dive lights. The removable stainless steel attack crown was the first to come off. Granted, it looks like it could do some serious damage if ever used for its intended purpose:

Screenshot2012-05-04at55710AM.jpg


Tail cap comes with a generous hole which allows you to use different thicknesses of line for tying in a bolt snap. Without a lanyard, the light can stand on its end:

rearcap.jpg


The light has 4 modes: off-flash-low-med-high. It has a bi-directional switch, so from the off position, you can go directly to the highest beam, or into flashing mode. Turning the switch is at best a two-handed affair, as there's an o-ring adding friction to prevent accidental switching. There are no detents, but after taking it apart, there's a groove with pits and a corresponding hole in the ring, so I guess you could put a bb and spring there to add the detents if you wish. Personally, since this will see salt-water use, I'd just leave it as is. Also visible is the small magnet used for switching. I may fix it in place with a bit of glue, as it might fall out and get lost when disassembling the light.

switchring.jpg


Speaking of o-rings, the tail-cap has 2 rings, while the other end has just one (the other ring is just for friction for the switch). Seeing as this part isn't unscrewed as much, I guess it'll suffice, though I guess 2 would've been better, though there is an extra groove in it. I may just add one later on:

o-rings.jpg


Inside the front bezel are small indentations which I initially took to be the mating points for a tool to remove the ring. I used a watch-back tool, and what I thought was an internal ring is actually just part of a solid front ring which can be unscrewed from the outside.

frontring.jpg


The reflector is a smooth aluminum reflector. I've been so used to having reflectors that screw into the pill, but this one just rests on it. Also seen in the inside of the head is the ledge where the lens and gasket rest.

reflector.jpg


Given the dimensions of the light head, the lens (3mm x 30mm) seems adequate to do its job. The lens is surrounded by a rubber gasket which provides good sealing properties especially at greater depths due to the greater compression of the seal.

lens.jpg


The next photo is of the LED in situ. I didn't feel comfortable disassembling further than that, so that's where I left it at.

IMG_0792.jpg


TESTING:

One thing to remember is that this is a dive light. As such, many eBay ads claim it to be able to go up to 100 meters. On KD though, they give a more realistic 30m figure. I decided to go half-way and test to the same depth rating for my GoPro cameras. Put it into my pot along with my watch/depth-gauge and brought it down to around 65 meters for about 15 minutes. No leaks :D

Screenshot2012-05-04at62151AM.jpg


Since this was to be my back-up light, I decided to test it against my current back-up: a Ferei W150 XPG light. The Ferei is slightly more solid and heavier (~220 g vs the ~180g for the TR-J1). In hand, the slightly thicker tube of the Ferei and the knurling on the tube makes it easier to hold I guess, but I like the TR-J1 for its sleek outline - though knurling would've been a nice touch for holding with wet or gloved hands.

IMG_0805.jpg


Anyway, in terms of light output, here's a few comparative shots of the TR-J1 vs the Ferei which is rated at 200 lumens. 24mm lens, 5.6 aperture, 1/30 shutter speed, ISO 400 (I didn't have a tripod so I didn't want a slower speed). Wall is around 8 meters away. Upper row: High, medium, low. Lower row: Ferei W150, W150 vs TR-J1, control shot.

beamshots.jpg


Bottom line: Looks like I've got a new favorite back-up light! Since I opted for just the light, I got it for around $35. At that rate, as Blindeye states, you can't go wrong!
 
Last edited:

JoelSim

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Aug 14, 2011
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Nice one Doc. Been looking for a good back-up and your detailed review here just helped make up my mind.

Couple (wife get's one also, of course) of them ordered and hopefully arriving in time for trip to Malta in a couple weeks. If they arrive they'll get a good testing there.

Will certainly post afterwards with any issues/non-issues.

Cheers,
Joel.
 

Doc Ed

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Interesting...

I took some tail-cap readings. Tested the light at high, medium, and low. Battery was a Smallsun 18650, "2400mah" at 3.97v. Seems the driver is only putting out half what an XML is capable of:

High setting: 1.79A

P1020560.jpg


Medium (50%): 0.83A

P1020561.jpg


Low (10%): 0.17A

P1020562.jpg


Interpolating the data with the Cree specs for an XML, the emitter lumens would be around:

High - prob ~ 600lm
Medium - prob ~300 lm
Low - less than 100 lm

Throw in your reflector losses so you can get the OTF lumens. Still, pretty bright. I was wondering how they could claim an 80 minute run-time on high. I guess it's because the light isn't driven that hard.

When I get my other light, I'll have an n=2 so it'll be better data.
 

sucnip

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My TR-J1 arrived yesterday. At the tailcap mine draws 1.5A in high, .75A in medium and .15A in low. Any tips on removing the lens? I don't want to mess up the gasket prying it out.
 

Doc Ed

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I'm going to try the suggestions of Hanachan and DIWdiver and either try using thicker gauge wires or use a different multimeter to determine tailcap current. So far, I'm seeing a large spread ranging from your values (1.5A here up to 2.3A from Hanachan's measurement). Anyway, more data is usually a good thing :D

While I think the ideal tool would be one that fits precisely onto the 4 mating surfaces inside the ring, it think any tool that gives good traction on the outside could be used. At any case, I was thinking of making a square tool that mates with all 4 points on the inside.

Screenshot2012-05-16at61209AM.jpg


As for the lens itself, after removing the bezel in front, simply tap the head and the lens/gasket should fall out on its own.
 

Doc Ed

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Hehehe! ;) I was waiting for someone else to do that. Anyhow, if no one else does it, I should have photos this Thursday after I get my 2nd light.

Were you able to remove the lens/gasket?
 

sucnip

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Will try again when I get home. It certainly did not want to fall out when turned upside down. :) On the flip side, the plastic slug around the positive terminal on the other side of the pill definately does not twist out. :-/
 

JoelSim

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I'm going to try the suggestions of Hanachan and DIWdiver and either try using thicker gauge wires or use a different multimeter to determine tailcap current. So far, I'm seeing a large spread ranging from your values (1.5A here up to 2.3A from Hanachan's measurement). Anyway, more data is usually a good thing :D

I have two of these little fellas here now. First impression is good....looking forward to testing them out in Malta next week.

If you could excuse my ignorance and point me in the right direction of how to measure the tailcap current, I can go ahead and do that on my two here and add to the data pool.

Cheers,
Joel.
 

350xfire

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I have two of these little fellas here now. First impression is good....looking forward to testing them out in Malta next week.

If you could excuse my ignorance and point me in the right direction of how to measure the tailcap current, I can go ahead and do that on my two here and add to the data pool.

Cheers,
Joel.

You would need to remove the tail cap and use an amp meter to measure current between the battery and the light's case. So get a multi meter and set it up to measure amps. Touch one of the leads to the back side of the battery and one to the flash light's barrel where it does not have anodizing. The light should turn on (once the switch is turned on) and the meter should show amps.
 

sucnip

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Further to what 350xfire said, depending on the multi-meter you have, you may need to move your red lead from the volt port to the current port. The black lead can stay in common.
 
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