Upgraded 1.5V AA/AAA rechargeable Li-ion batteries with power indicator

XTAR Light

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For 1.5V AA/AAA rechargeable Li-ion battery, many users like its 1.5V constant voltage output advantage, which helps to improve the devices' performance. For example, it lasts longer in some devices like the Xbox Wireless Controller, and it could make the RC toy car go faster for better playtime, or the battery operated screwdriver rotate quicker…While, some people think the constant voltage might be a disadvantage too. It's constant so battery gauges don't work. The battery in the devices might drop from 100% to 0% without any reminder, then suddenly power off.

To solve this, we released the updated rechargeable XTAR 1.5V AA & AAA batteries with power indicator function. Unique built-in voltage control IC enables the devices which have lower power indicator function to remind users in time when the power is insufficient. Matching with the new LC4 charger, it's convenient to charge these batteries.

Please check more details here:
https://www.amazon.com/XTAR-Lithium-Rechargeable-Low-Voltage-Indication/dp/B0B27JQKPR/?th=1

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arrgh my eyes!!

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I would think using mAh is confusing considering the battery has an output at a different voltage than the chemistry supporting it, so it’s not clear which voltage is used to measure. Using watts solves that problem
 

knucklegary

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Amz site is for pre order. The upgraded AA batts won't be available until late Summer, is this correct?
 
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ledbetter

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I don’t really need the 1.5v constant voltage aa battery but got a few of a different brand just to try and they’re ok. A couple of negatives for me were parasitic drain and they cut out completely when dead. Didn’t do any run time tests but didn’t appear to be anything special. Prefer the taper warning of eneloops or energizer lithiums. But for certain applications, they might be worth a try if you go through 1.5s quickly and you don’t want to use alkaleaks. Don’t know if this model with more flashing lights will be a benefit when the battery is enclosed in the device.
 

knucklegary

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Yeah, I think the low voltage warning works in conjunction with some electronic door locks, but idk for sure..
Ledbetter, I think you're correct. For flashlights Eneloops are the way to go.. Energiser lithium AA/AAA 1.5v I use in place of alaleaks in a few lights and when they're depleted it's lights out without any warning
 

KITROBASKIN

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"when they're depleted it's lights out without any warning"

Well now, that's when a person's backup flashlight comes in mighty handy, right? Kind of justifies carrying an extra...
I'd much rather have 1.5V/cell than 1.3V/cell in a flashlight, or other devices that putter out when voltage drops much below 1.3V
 

fulee9999

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I don’t really need the 1.5v constant voltage aa battery but got a few of a different brand just to try and they’re ok. A couple of negatives for me were parasitic drain and they cut out completely when dead. Didn’t do any run time tests but didn’t appear to be anything special. Prefer the taper warning of eneloops or energizer lithiums. But for certain applications, they might be worth a try if you go through 1.5s quickly and you don’t want to use alkaleaks. Don’t know if this model with more flashing lights will be a benefit when the battery is enclosed in the device.

from the description I was under the impression that the circus trick for this one is not that it blinks, but before going dead it goes to a lower power mode, so the equipment it is installed in can detect the battery dieing... or at least that's what I gathered from the safe-lock demo.

so it goes 1.5v until it's depleted down to 15 or 10% then it goes into a 0.8V ( or whatever ) low power mode, so the device it is installed in can detect the battery running flat
 

ledbetter

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I guess it’s an improvement? Complication without increased performance. If i had a device that would support it maybe I’d be interested. It’s definitely not the technological battery improvement that needs to take place for that electric everything world I’ll be happy to avoid.
 

fulee9999

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I guess it’s an improvement? Complication without increased performance. If i had a device that would support it maybe I’d be interested. It’s definitely not the technological battery improvement that needs to take place for that electric everything world I’ll be happy to avoid.

I'd say it's definitely an improvement, my Keeppower stabilized 1.5v and 3v batteries just cut out when they're depleted without any warning, so I welcome this improvement
 

knucklegary

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Great for stationary devices like that door lock. But for flashlights that go bump from time to time and there goes the protection circuit?
 

aznsx

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Great for stationary devices like that door lock. But for flashlights that go bump from time to time and there goes the protection circuit?
There's a fair bit of electronic circuitry incorporated into many of my own Li ion cells, including many (most?) of those provided by the major flashlight manufacturers themselves, and I believe also most battery packs in almost every kind of portable electronic device of most any kind that I own and can think of that's Li ion powered - including headphones, telephones, power tools... (the list seems endless these days). If I became intolerant of theoretical reliability issues induced by such circuitry, there's an awful lot of things I'd have to give up. I think I'll choose to live with those theoretical reliability risks until they've been shown to be statistically significant. Given that I 'specialize' in electronic reliability, that may sound downright careless of me, but I'm actually not careless at all, and I ignore no potentials for failure. There's just a point where I feel I must buy quality equipment wisely, and then take calculated risks, trust that equipment, and move on - Otherwise, I'd have to give up too many things. I'm not promoting or approving of these specific cells in any way, just commenting on that 'issue' globally.

I can say that I wouldn't own a safe with an electronic lock of any kind, as the failure rate (including power source) would almost have to be higher than the S&G mechanical lock on mine, failure is essentially intolerable and could put me in a very bad situation, and the increased risk would pay little to no dividend for me. That's how I 'calculate' that risk:). An increased risk with high potential consequences with little or no reward is something I would reject.
 

knucklegary

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I got an answer back from Amz store says 2700mWh = 1800mAh..

Personally, I don't like the idea of toting around a special charger everywhere I go with these cells. For sure the batts have there use somewhere just not in my flashlights
 

aznsx

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I got an answer back from Amz store says 2700mWh = 1800mAh..

Personally, I don't like the idea of toting around a special charger everywhere I go with these cells. For sure the batts have there use somewhere just not in my flashlights
A bespoke charger is an issue to consider, for sure. For these, I'd probably prefer on-board USB charging, especially when mobile / traveling, but that may be too much sparky stuff to cram in there. Few things are all 'pros' of course, and generally come with a 'con' or two (in engineering, and life in general it seems). Tradeoffs and compromises.

I don't know if I have a spot for these yet (which I may), but one thing I'll absolutely need is the actual output in volts after they switch into 'low SOC warning mode'. Approximation won't suffice for that, it'll have to be in the spec sheet for me. Devices all have their own detection thresholds, and since this is a headline feature, it needs to be clearly specified. I looked through much of the info, but didn't see that. Let me know if I missed it somehow. I also didn't see (but might have just missed) approx. remaining capacity when that output switches - close enough to approximate remaining operating time for a given device before hitting the cliff. SOC in % might suffice, but I'd rather minimize my math! I'll have to check out the info again, but the specs I saw seem a little too light at this point - and again, maybe I just missed these things. I'm getting old, so..........
 
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