using Eneloops in a trail camera

retiredone

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I got a trail camera a little while ago and used up the 8 new alkaleaks I put in to try it out quick enough to think that going back to the rechargeable NiMH AAs I used when I was a bike commuter 15 years ago would be a good idea. Most of the old batteries I had from then won't hold a charge anymore and I regretted buying batteries that were supposed to be as good as Eneloops but weren't.
The trail camera says it needs 4 or 8 AA batteries to run and I'd like to find out if 4 Eneloops would work here. I'm not too worried about run time as I want to use it in the back yard to see what kind of critters come visit at night and can recharge the 4 batteries in a Xtar VC4 charger and wouldn't need to use it every night if it took longer to recharge 8 cells if that's what was needed/would work here.
Does anyone know if 4 Eneloops would work here? Or would the voltage be too low? Would 8 Eneloops be needed if 4 wouldn't work? The seller couldn't answer the question for me so I'm hoping someone here can.
 

KITROBASKIN

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Very possibly no because trail camera is designed for alkalines, but there are some out there that can do it based on my research. No harm in trying. We ended up getting a trail camera with sizable integrated lithium bank. One can get a dedicated small solar panel to charge batteries in them but then one is restricted to placing the camera somewhere in the sun to illuminate the panels.
 

ghostguy6

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Best would be to check camera settings to see if there is an option to use NiHM as a power source. The cameras I have will on NiMH but only if you change the battery option in the menu. If you dont the camera wont take any pictures but will allow you to use the screen.
 

retiredone

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Best would be to check camera settings to see if there is an option to use NiHM as a power source. The cameras I have will on NiMH but only if you change the battery option in the menu. If you dont the camera wont take any pictures but will allow you to use the screen.
I looked in the owners manual but it didn't say whether it needed the extra voltage from the alkalines or not. It just said the battery life will be longer with 8. I'll have to look in the settings to see if I can select NiMH, thanks for the tip - I hadn't thought about that.
 

bykfixer

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I started using eneloops for cameras when they first came out back like 2007-ish. I could get maybe 25 pix with alkalines and 200 with eneloops.

My guess would be 8 cells to have flash. As in 4 for monitor/take photos and the other 4 for lighting up the scene.
 

retiredone

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I started using eneloops for cameras when they first came out back like 2007-ish. I could get maybe 25 pix with alkalines and 200 with eneloops.

My guess would be 8 cells to have flash. As in 4 for monitor/take photos and the other 4 for lighting up the scene.
This one uses infrared for night pictures, and they're in black and white and is labeled as taking 4k video. I figure I'll try 4 Eneloops and see what happens. If it works but has less run time I'll be happy. If not I'll either have some decent rechargeables for the AA lights I have or will gamble on getting 4 more Eneloops to see if the trail camera will work.
 
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Eneloops work poorly for me in my Browning and other various cameras. I now only use Energizer Lithium primaries. Get up to a year run time in all sorts of conditions. Lithium primaries have a temperature operating range of -40°F to +140°F and have minimal self-drain. For important trail cams (e.g. all my hunting and security cameras), lithium is worth it.
 

Monocrom

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Honestly, likely best to stick with alkalines in your case.
Though I'd shoot an email to the company and ask if other types of batteries are good to go in your camera.
 
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Honestly, likely best to stick with alkalines in your case.
Though I'd shoot an email to the company and ask if other types of batteries are good to go in your camera.

Friends don't let friends use alkaleaks...ever...for any reason. The $$$ of alkaline battery destroyed flashlights, radios, cameras, and other expensive electronics is astounding.
 

WalkIntoTheLight

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I'm just wondering if NiMH can hack the cold. As I recall, they didn't do well in a thermometer in my refrigerator.

Any Eneloop version after the first release (basically anything within the last 10 years) is rated down to -20C. I use them outside, and they're good to almost -30C, at least for low-drain applications. For a trail camera, I wouldn't trust them below -20C. In any case, they'll definitely out-perform alkaleaks in cold conditions, as alkaleaks aren't much good below 0C.
 
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Energizer Lithium Primaries are better in every way than Eneloop, except for being single use! Being single use is a big deal for lots of applications, however, with modern cameras that can run for 2 years on a fresh battery load, I think it's worth the extra goodness.

-40°F to 140°F (far wider temperature range than all others)
3000 mAh (50% more than Eneloop)
All cameras recognize Lithium. Not all recognize Eneloops due to only being 1.2 volts instead of 1.5. Many cameras will shut down well before Eneloop is empty due to thinking the battery is dead.
 
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