UV For Rapid Antigen Test

AshFey

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Nov 3, 2021
Messages
6
Location
The Metaforest
Hi, longtime lurker here who finally has a question that couldn't be answered by the search function.
The COVID rapid antigen tests we will be using requires a "UV flashlight" to view the results.
Since we want to get the most accurate info from the tests, what's the best UV light for this?

Also wouldn't hurt if I could get a UV light that matches my 316 grade stainless steel torches with hexagonal features (stainless steel hexagonal shaped EDC is my ideal!)
 

parang

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
175
Two key attributes are the wavelength and the power output I reckon.
 

PhotonWrangler

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
14,370
Location
In a handbasket
If this is the type of rapid test you're referring to, the instructions call for a 365nm UV light. Given this requirement, any ~395nm "near-UV" light will be unacceptable and will produce unreliable results. Stick with any light that specifies 365nm, either LED or filtered fluorescent "BLB" lamp.
 

AshFey

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Nov 3, 2021
Messages
6
Location
The Metaforest
Thanks for the replies! I've seen some lights that specify the nm on ebay, etc, but wondered how reliable the seller's claims were, especially now there is a demand for these lights. Are there any you can recommend?
 

KITROBASKIN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 28, 2013
Messages
5,340
Location
New Mexico, USA
According to the info PW provided, each kit comes with a UV light. Are you wanting your own high quality, stainless steel, hexagonal UV flashlight?

Could you be so kind to please explain "The Metaforest"? Is it under the umbrella of the beast formerly known as Facebook?
 

AshFey

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Nov 3, 2021
Messages
6
Location
The Metaforest
Pretty sure the tests we will be purchasing do not come with lights.
I'd love my own "high quality, stainless steel, hexagonal UV flashlight", but I couldn't find anything like that online, so I'm guessing this is not as easy as I would have liked. :p
Google is giving me nothing when searching Tattu U15, but the Convoy S2+ UV looks worthwhile.
I think I should also look at stand alone lights. We have several of these that are UVC for disinfection.
(Metaphorically speaking, The Metaforest is the preferred vacation spot for writers of speculative fiction prone to purple prose...)
 

nbp

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 16, 2007
Messages
10,969
Location
Wisconsin
Inova X5 UV is a very nice UV light. You frequently see TSA using them for checking identifications.

 

rdwilson

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Dec 4, 2002
Messages
54
Location
Texas
I second the Inova for close inspection. The beam is very diffuse.

For a longer throw, I have a Chinese-made light labeled "Anjonet WF-501B." It's also sold under the Ultrafire brand.

 

KITROBASKIN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 28, 2013
Messages
5,340
Location
New Mexico, USA
Not available at retail but there may be something else you would like on Vinh's website:


He could make a dropin using a quality UV 365nm, or a non-modular flashlight with your choice of emitter.

Speculative fiction, purple prose; glad I asked!
 

TechGuru

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Sep 24, 2017
Messages
139
Location
TEXAS
I have this one: https://www.harborfreight.com/lighting/flashlights/uv-blacklight-flashlight-63931.html

It is 365nm as far as I can tell.


"The main difference is that the 395 nm LED emits much more visible light than the 365 nm LED. The 395 nm LED emits a pronounced violet-colored light, while the 365 nm LED emits a dull, bluish-white light (the result of residual light energy that "tails" off into the visible spectrum). Both types emit in the UV-A wavelength range and are generally capable of producing "blacklight" or curing effects."
 

Wheezy59

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Messages
25
Location
J'ville Fla
Hi, longtime lurker here who finally has a question that couldn't be answered by the search function.
The COVID rapid antigen tests we will be using requires a "UV flashlight" to view the results.
Since we want to get the most accurate info from the tests, what's the best UV light for this?

Also wouldn't hurt if I could get a UV light that matches my 316 grade stainless steel torches with hexagonal features (stainless steel hexagonal shaped EDC is my ideal!)
HDS makes one if you want one that will last your lifetime and your grandchildrens as well. Excellent quality period.
Peace
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2009
Messages
855
Location
Columbus, Ohio
HDS makes one if you want one that will last your lifetime and your grandchildrens as well. Excellent quality period.
Pea
Hi, longtime lurker here who finally has a question that couldn't be answered by the search function.
The COVID rapid antigen tests we will be using requires a "UV flashlight" to view the results.
Since we want to get the most accurate info from the tests, what's the best UV light for this?

Also wouldn't hurt if I could get a UV light that matches my 316 grade stainless steel torches with hexagonal features (stainless steel hexagonal shaped EDC is my ideal!)
Also, Olight makes a 1xAA UV light, although I don't recall the wavelength. About $35 if memory serves...
 

electrolyte

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
61
I have a difficult time believing that any approved test can be done with any old UV light source and. Generally that sort of thing has to be supplied by the test kit manufacturer. Sure, lots of people can figure out what kind of UV flashlight will work, but if you go off-label with the light source, you no longer have an approved test. Yes, the correct wavelength is critical. So too, however, is the intensity of the light. Even with a consistent light source, one problem with fluorescent tests like this that I can see is the variability that might be introduced by ambient light variation and the distance between the "flashlight" and the strip surface. A chamber with a lamp and a window that the test cassette would slide into would be a much better solution. It would, however, increase cost. I don't know much about home test economics, but given what insurance companies will pay for, clinical testing is a very low margin enterprise.
 

AshFey

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Nov 3, 2021
Messages
6
Location
The Metaforest
Wow, thanks for the replies. Sorry I haven't worked out how to quote posts.
I'll be trawling over the Sky Lumen site for some time.
The Inova X5 is a nice looking light. I know from experience though, that I end up messing up titanium plating, and cannot make it last.

Rapid Antigen tests are less accurate than laboratory tests, and throw both false positives and false negatives. I think the point of them is that they are used every day, so will show an infection sooner or later, but optimally before an infected person becomes peak infectious to other people. I agree just throwing in "illuminate the result window with a UV flashlight to observe the test result" at the end of the directions is not confidence building for result accuracy.

Also agree with turbodog that easy disinfection of the light is a must.
 
Top