UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

RedLED

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 5, 2006
Messages
3,608
Location
Palm Springs, CA, Beverly Hills, CA, Washington, D
What do we use to protect our eyes rom the 365nm for Norland curing? 3M makes many different ones, and it gets confusing?

I want to get a UV from Don, but need some glasses to go with it, any advice would be welcome?

Thanks,

RL
 
Last edited:

nfetterly

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 17, 2008
Messages
3,758
Location
Cincinnati area, but lots of travel
What do we use to protect our eyes rom the 365nm for Norland curing? 3M makes many different ones, and it gets confusing?

I want ant to get a UV from Don, but need some glasses to go with it, any advice would be welcome?

Thanks,

RL
Subscribed, I've got a UV LED from Don, I try not to look at the light as I'm curing Norland, but I also use it sometimes taking photos...

So - also wondering what I should be doing...
 

archimedes

Moderator,
Staff member
CPF Supporter
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
15,792
Location
CONUS, top left
I was disappointed with the effectiveness of "regular" UV blocking glasses, but laser-certified lenses/goggles ( @365nm ) appear to provide much greater intensity reduction.

Very expensive, however.
 

Ladd

Enlightened
Joined
Jan 29, 2015
Messages
923
Location
US
Subscribed. What do dentists and other professionals use?
 

RI Chevy

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Aug 9, 2011
Messages
3,600
Location
Ocean State
The yellow lenses from 3M safety glasses are pretty good for moderate protection. Much better than nothing.
 

Reellegend01

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
46
Sooo if I don't have the money to but a enclosed uv light what's best alternative to do 10 trits in a light I got coming????
 

RedLED

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 5, 2006
Messages
3,608
Location
Palm Springs, CA, Beverly Hills, CA, Washington, D
The yellow lenses from 3M safety glasses are pretty good for moderate protection. Much better than nothing.

Yes, but we need the best protection, you don't want to have something that glows for 40 years that you can't see in 10 years?

3M must make dozens of pairs, and while I love their products, their customer service is awful, when I called to find out about the different colors of Scotch Brite Pads, the guy on the phone said, "To be honest we make so any different colors, I can't answer your question, I don't know the difference in the colors."

I really miss miss the old phones you could slam down, like Jerry Seinfeld said 'How do we slam cordless phones down?' And now cell phones?

Called the Minnesota Secretary of State, and got the direct numbers to the CEO, President, and VP. Backdrop phone lines! A trick my wife taught me.

These big big companies think they can give answers like that? My trick is find out when their annual meeting is, go there and dress nice, then walk right up to the Chairman. Always being a gentleman, of course. I just wanted an answer. This was a different company. The chairman, being so amazed at what I had done, invited me to go to dinner with them. Oh, and I got my answer!
 
Last edited:

archimedes

Moderator,
Staff member
CPF Supporter
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
15,792
Location
CONUS, top left
There are quite a few ... a web search for laser safety glasses reveals several large manufacturers.

They are generally rated by "OD" (optical density) , a term with which you likely are already familiar ;)
 
Last edited:

McGizmo

Flashaholic
Joined
May 1, 2002
Messages
17,282
Location
Maui
Where are you looking at these glasses? What companies? Also, do dentists use 365nm?

I think some of the light curing bonding agents work on higher wavelengths like royal blue. I understand most glasses provide significant UV protection but nothing is better than simply not looking at the light or its reflection if it can be avoided. I don't know if any of you guys have used Bondic but I picked some up and am real happy with how quickly it cures and suspect it would be a viable alternative to the Norland. They don't specify what wavelength their little 5 mm LED is but considering how quickly the material cures using their LED, it would seem that exposure to UV with their system is pretty marginal. I have found that the Bondic cures very fast with the 365 nm Nichia and I just look away when I fire up the LED and hold it on for a few seconds.
 

archimedes

Moderator,
Staff member
CPF Supporter
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
15,792
Location
CONUS, top left
Since it could be considered safety equipment, it may be prudent for individuals to research their own specific needs and suitability.
 

more_vampires

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 20, 2014
Messages
3,475
Do you have any names of companies that make these glasses? That would be a big start in the right direction.
Thanks,
RL
Since it could be considered safety equipment, it may be prudent for individuals to research their own specific needs and suitability.
http://noirlaser.com/

Do NOT buy unless you know exactly what it is you're buying. If you have the slightest doubt then it's time for more reading. Those things are REALLY expensive, so it's going to hurt in more than one way if you get the wrong thing.

To get a set with too weak of an OD gives a false sense of protection.

Good luck!
 

RedLED

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 5, 2006
Messages
3,608
Location
Palm Springs, CA, Beverly Hills, CA, Washington, D
Thank you for the replies, and I do agree with you gentlemen on the research factor.

Let me pose this question, keeping in mind I know nothing about this subject, but is closing your eyes or looking down with a pair of glasses you feel might be rated, and as awful as that sounds, it is simply a question.

Wait...I thought this was the Information Age, quick someone call Vice President Gore, surely he must know as the inventor of the information superhighway!

But, seriously guys, we need to get this right it is much to serious and final if we don't do, it right!

Does anyone have insight as to what other industries that use the UV light as we do? At least as a starting point? I will start looking into it, however, I am always called away for things, and don't get back to things like this as quickly as I would like, so any additional help would be great, and we have some very bright people in this thread, not to mention the entire forum.

Thank you all for your help, once we get it figured out for certain, it will help future generations looking for the same information in the for years to come.

You know, in the past you could call high tech companies and get really good answers from people, on the phone, now if you try to ask a technical question, you are asked: well, who are you, why do you want to know? Like we are Al Qaeda, asking. Very frustrating

I was thinking of calling MIT, Stanford, Cal-Tech., NASA, Boeing and others to see how far I can get? You never know. It really is a very simple question.

Let's try to keep this one going for our own safety, and safety of others who like Trit. Vials. They are fun and I love them, as do many here!

As always, best wishes to the good people on CPF,

RedLED
 
Last edited:

RedLED

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 5, 2006
Messages
3,608
Location
Palm Springs, CA, Beverly Hills, CA, Washington, D
http://noirlaser.com/

Do NOT buy unless you know exactly what it is you're buying. If you have the slightest doubt then it's time for more reading. Those things are REALLY expensive, so it's going to hurt in more than one way if you get the wrong thing.

To get a set with too weak of an OD gives a false sense of protection.

Good luck!

Very good advice here.

Look, those of us in the custom light arena are spending quite a bit of Money on some of the finest items ever made in their class in the world - bar none, and it just makes sense to spend money on the best set of UV glasses, really, why stop there?

I think if we work collectively on this together we will find the product we are looking for, and I would be willing to even loan mine out to someone with a good standing here in the board to complete a small project of vial installation as they may be expensive and I would not mind doing that as I will not be using them in an everyday manner, I just want the proper pair, and would loan them out so someone's eyes don't get ruined for a hobby.

Really, I am confident we will find what we are looking for!

As always, yours's in McGizmo,

RL
 

TEEJ

Flashaholic
Joined
Jan 12, 2012
Messages
7,490
Location
NJ
You'd need to know the power of the source, and then calculations of reflected UV could be postulated.

The lenses used for lasers are obviously going to have very high optical density, due to the concentration of the beams, and the same OD rating may be a bit conservative for a non-coherent beam.

The OD rating is needed for the particular wavelength RANGE (UV LED will NOT be emitting a single wavelength, hence the portion of visible light too, etc), so a lens may be rated at different OD for different wave lengths, etc.

The advantage to the curing scenario is that the superfluous wavelengths can at least help you aim/tell you where you're curing, etc...as the specific OD means, typically, that you can't see the wavelength of concern (As THAT'S the one being blocked...)...so, the lower OD wavelengths are what you SEE by.

Eagle Pair makes some (relatively) inexpensive, yet at least rated, safety goggles/glasses. Noir makes better (more expensive, etc) ones...the $ going towards higher OD and better light transmission, etc.

The 195 - 540 nm versions would be a typical range inclusive of the 365 UV range.
 

more_vampires

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 20, 2014
Messages
3,475
Thanks for the quick reply, so we should be safe between 195 to 540, with no problems?
If and only if the OD (optical density) rating is correct for the intensity of your particular use.

The problem with having 1 set of eye shields and loaning them out is that you cannot guarantee that the intensity of the light source they are using is not as bright as the intensity of YOUR light source or even the same wavelength.

2 criteria for eye protection:
1. The eye shields must block ALL of the wavelengths you're working with.
2. The "darkness" aka "optical density" of the lenses must be dense/dark enough to actually do anything.

Sunglasses for this are out of the question. Your irises will dilate and make you more vulnerable to bad frequencies, sunglasses are some of the worst eye protection out there. They love making false claims like "blocks 100% UVA UVB." BS. They didn't say at what intensity.

Hope that made sense.
 

RedLED

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 5, 2006
Messages
3,608
Location
Palm Springs, CA, Beverly Hills, CA, Washington, D
If and only if the OD (optical density) rating is correct for the intensity of your particular use.

The problem with having 1 set of eye shields and loaning them out is that you cannot guarantee that the intensity of the light source they are using is not as bright as the intensity of YOUR light source or even the same wavelength.

2 criteria for eye protection:
1. The eye shields must block ALL of the wavelengths you're working with.
2. The "darkness" aka "optical density" of the lenses must be dense/dark enough to actually do anything.

Sunglasses for this are out of the question. Your irises will dilate and make you more vulnerable to bad frequencies, sunglasses are some of the worst eye protection out there. They love making false claims like "blocks 100% UVA UVB." BS. They didn't say at what intensity.

Hope that made sense.[/QUOTE

Yes, you put that in clear terms even someone like myself with no real study in this field understood? Also, I have never thought the claims to sunglasses to be true, the advertisers lie. I had to have cataract surgery when I was 39, and always wore good quality sunglasses from the optometrist. I fact, I have to have it all re done soon.

How do we go about researching this? So many in academia tell you things so wrong, but of course they in their own minds are never wrong, ever, and could never, ever be wrong. My wife is an academic and I have to correct her on things all the time. (Say, don't take this wrong if you have an advanced degree, I think if you do, you will understand where I am coming from). However, please continue with this as many of our friends here could be doing damage they don't understand fully, and that's not good...Trit vials are too cool not have over a pair of glasses.

So, are you saying we need an exact pair for 365 nm? That I was not completely clear on, but you put the rest in a nice focus of understanding.

You know, your code name here on the forums involves vampires, if you know any maybe they could do the work for us! they seem to be able to see in the dark, keep late hours and have eyes exempt from UV, only bright sunlight, and could have a side line in the Trit. Vial install industry! Would they take blood as payment for these services? Plus they are always well spoken with a good command of the language, most polite, and wear some pretty sharp threads, always perfectly dressed, in some cases over dressed and very well groomed.

They all have impeccable taste, and seem to be brought up in good homes, and are very well educated. Except for the biting thing they would make great neighbors, I bet their lawns are perfect, and they drive nice cars, or no, wait they fly? Right?

All, joking and kidding around aside, the UV thing is a serious matter, and you seem to know about this subject, and I thank you for your help. And hope you will continue to help us find the protection we are looking for and need.

Thank you so much,

With all best wishes,

RL
 
Last edited:

more_vampires

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 20, 2014
Messages
3,475
Appreciate the kind words, RL.

To clarify the clarification :)

The laser eye shields aren't cut-and-dry 365nm and no other frequency. Noir has a great many charts and charts and charts showing the RANGE of wavelengths blocked and what ranges are transmitted through the eye shield. To go with the example, there is no "365nm eye shield."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_safety
Wavelength rangePathological effect
180–315 nm (UV-B, UV-C)photokeratitis (inflammation of the cornea, equivalent to sunburn)
315–400 nm (UV-A)photochemical cataract (clouding of the eye lens)
400–780 nm (visible)photochemical damage to the retina, retinal burn
780–1400 nm (near-IR)cataract, retinal burn
1.4–3.0μm (IR)aqueous flare (protein in the aqueous humour), cataract, corneal burn
3.0 μm–1 mmcorneal burn
--------------------
Maximum permissible exposure
The maximum permissible exposure (MPE) is the highest power or energy density (in W/cm2​ or J/cm2​) of a light source that is considered safe, i.e. that has a negligible probability for creating damage. It is usually about 10% of the dose that has a 50% chance of creating damage[7] under worst-case conditions. The MPE is measured at the cornea of the human eye or at the skin, for a given wavelength and exposure time.
-------------------
The use of eye protection when operating lasers of classes 3B and 4 in a manner that may result in eye exposure in excess of the MPE is required in the workplace by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Protective eyewear in the form of spectacles or goggles with appropriately filtering optics can protect the eyes from the reflected or scattered laser light with a hazardous beam power, as well as from direct exposure to a laser beam. Eyewear must be selected for the specific type of laser, to block or attenuate in the appropriate wavelength range. For example, eyewear absorbing 532 nm typically has an orange appearance, transmitting wavelengths larger than 550 nm. Such eyewear would be useless as protection against a laser emitting at 800 nm. Furthermore, some lasers emit more than one wavelength of light, and this may be a particular problem with some less expensive frequency-doubled lasers, such as 532 nm "green laser pointers" which are commonly pumped by 808 nm infrared laser diodes, and also generate an intermediate 1064 nm laser beam which is used to produce the final 532 nm output. If the IR radiation is allowed into the beam, which happens in some green laser pointers, it will in general not be blocked by regular red or orange colored protective eyewear designed for pure green or already IR-filtered beam. Special YAG laser and dual-frequency eyewear is available for work with frequency-doubled YAG and other IR lasers which have a visible beam, but it is more expensive, and IR-pumped green laser products do not always specify whether such extra protection is needed.[24]

Eyewear is rated for optical density (OD), which is the base-10 logarithm of the attenuation factor by which the optical filter reduces beam power. For example, eyewear with OD 3 will reduce the beam power in the specified wavelength range by a factor of 1,000. In addition to an optical density sufficient to reduce beam power to below the maximum permissible exposure (see above), laser eyewear used where direct beam exposure is possible should be able to withstand a direct hit from the laser beam without breaking. The protective specifications (wavelengths and optical densities) are usually printed on the goggles, generally near the top of the unit. In the European Community, manufacturers are required by European standard EN 207 to specify the maximum power rating rather than the optical density.

Whew! There's a mountain of this stuff to sift through. Really looks extremely easy to pick the wrong eye shields, waste a couple hundred bucks and have a false sense of protection.

I spent a few minutes hunting for 365nm glasses, I flipped through about 50 spec sheets. Haven't found one I'd call suitable yet.

Research, research, and research some more. Strongest I've found yet is OD7, but don't like the ranges I'm seeing.

I need some broad spectrum UV protection for working with home made carbon filament incan and carbon arc, so I'm working towards this as well. I'm along for the ride.

I'm leaning towards welding goggles as arc welding is pretty much like working with carbon arc.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top