UV protection while using 365nm light

ptolemy

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Feb 21, 2007
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Hi guys,

I have a set of industrial plastic googles which are antiglare coated (i assume just uv coated). are they ok to wear when using 365nm UV nichia? or do I need something specific? if so, can someone provide some links to ones I can get

thanx:)
 

bkumanski

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Any pair of glasses with UV protection will due to protect your eyes from damage...problem is the color changes will effect how the object looks you are trying to illuminate. Our ALS at work has several colored glasses (all UV protected) to see things under different conditions and on different surfaces. I would suggest trying an amber pair first. Clear probably won't cut it. We also use red and green lenses, but those mostly collect dust. I've never seen our techs ever using anything other than the amber lenses.

I found this site which sells the lenses without a kit (scroll to the bottom of the page). They carry clear, so I guess that would work too.
http://www.evidentcrimescene.com/cata/light/light.html
 
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tino_ale

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I wear glasses because of my fairly poor sight. I believe they are supposed to protect against UV, but they are clear of course, not colored.

Do you think they are sufficient when curing Norland with 365nm Leds?
 

darknessemitter

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I wear glasses because of my fairly poor sight. I believe they are supposed to protect against UV, but they are clear of course, not colored.

Do you think they are sufficient when curing Norland with 365nm Leds?

I would suggest wearing additional safety-type goggles (with UV protection) over your prescription glasses. Your prescription lenses might give you some protection from direct UV, but they don't protect your eyes from other angles where UV can get around your lenses.
 
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Bullzeyebill

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Are we worrying about reflected 365nm light here? We certainly are not aiming the UV light at our eyes are we. Doesn't the wave length change when reflected?

Bill
 

LightScene

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Shine the light directly through the glasses (but not in your eyes) in a dark room and see if anything is getting through.
 

bkumanski

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Are we worrying about reflected 365nm light here? We certainly are not aiming the UV light at our eyes are we. Doesn't the wave length change when reflected?

Bill

Maybe, but I know from personal experience with out ALS it HURTS after only a few seconds of exposure. Maybe ours is more powerful, but even the reflected light is harmful to the eyes. Now, in a regular "black light" or low wattage led, maybe its not a big deal. I don't know, really. I guess it depends on what the light is being used for, how reflective the surface, how close the operator is to the beam, power of the led, etc. I'm just making the recommendation out of caution. The whole point of a flashoholic is to really appreciate the power of light, not be blinded by it:D.
 

darknessemitter

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Are we worrying about reflected 365nm light here? We certainly are not aiming the UV light at our eyes are we. Doesn't the wave length change when reflected?

Bill

Well, I think that depends on what is reflecting it. If it hits fluorescent material, then yes, a lot of it is being converted to a visible wavelength, but that doesn't mean that nothing reflects it as the same wavelength. For example, if you shine a UV led into a mirror, the reflected radiation can still fluoresce the security strip in a $20 bill.

Also, think about blue light. It's not as short a wavelength as UV, but it can still fluoresce a lot of substances, even though a lot of it is still reflected as blue light. The same can presumably happen with UV, it's just that we can only see the fluorescence, not the reflected UV.
 

darknessemitter

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Shine the light directly through the glasses (but not in your eyes) in a dark room and see if anything is getting through.

Yup, or more importantly, that stuff isn't fluorescing. If the led's also produce a bit of visible light, then that might get through, but that's ok as long as it isn't causing fluorescence.
 

waddup

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Are we worrying about reflected 365nm light here? We certainly are not aiming the UV light at our eyes are we. Doesn't the wave length change when reflected?

Bill

i spent 10 minutes looking for dog urine the other night with a $15 uv light.

no eye protection.

my eyes definitely felt very strange when i was done.

ill be wearing eye protection next time.
 

mr.snakeman

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i spent 10 minutes looking for dog urine the other night with a $15 uv light.

no eye protection.

my eyes definitely felt very strange when i was done.

ill be wearing eye protection next time.
Always a good idea when working with UV lighting, regardless of the wavelength.
 
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