Water Bottles: What do you use?

jabe1

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Best I've found is the Klean Kanteen 20 oz wide mouth. I recently upgraded to this from the single walled 27oz model. Both are fantastic, but the double wall is the best. I use the"cafe cap" lid so I can't misplace the original. Hot or cold beverages.
 
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Bucur

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I carry the Thermos Titanium in the saddlebag of my motorcycle. The Contigo with nipple lock is for the cup holder (which is open to the elements) so that the nipple remains clean. Both are vacuum sealed for insulation.

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KITROBASKIN

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Jason at Number 6 Brands, brings us the Cauldryn heating water bottle. Able to use AC, DC and Battery Power to heat and maintain water at four different temperatures, it can be very useful for some of us. I am excited about it, as it will solve a specific need for me. The double walled stainless steel bottle holds 16 oz.

After providing Jason with a couple links of reviews I have done, he sent me, without cost on my part, what I was willing to buy. At first the battery powered option looked like it would not be used enough to justify the cost, but since we do not have a real powerbank (only a couple of battery chargers) I decided to ask for the Cauldryn Mobile as well as 2 DC bases.

Here is a 6 minute 40 second video of the opening. I have already video recorded bringing water to boil with AC power and also used the battery this evening. The battery system is especially impressive, and look forward to using the DC base in our vehicle and at our small cabin with the photovoltaic system.

 

KITROBASKIN

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If you're thinking of getting this heating water bottle, looks like the battery base is about 3 times faster to bring to boil. Will create a dedicated thread for this product soon.
 

markr6

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Some big white plastic Nalgene bottle. Maybe 32 oz. Cost about $4.

I believe that's the HDPE version. Bombproof. Temp rating of a billion degrees or something so you can add boiling water if necessary.
 

KITROBASKIN

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Outdoor Research sells a very nice insulated soft carrier that uses a belt loop or molle connection for that Nalgene 32 oz. water bottle. This would be good for the cold times.
 

markr6

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Outdoor Research sells a very nice insulated soft carrier that uses a belt loop or molle connection for that Nalgene 32 oz. water bottle. This would be good for the cold times.

Those are nice, and necessary, once it get's cold enough. I also have a neoprene version from Nalgene which leaves the top exposed. More of a holster style still good below freezing, but not as much.
 

KITROBASKIN

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Those are nice, and necessary, once it get's cold enough. I also have a neoprene version from Nalgene which leaves the top exposed. More of a holster style still good below freezing, but not as much.

Thinking your neoprene holster style would help keep drink cooler during the hot summer. I looked at the Nalgene water bottles at Target today. The polycarbonate (#7 plastic) was about $10, so thinking the honorable Treeguy does have the HDPE (#2) which a lot of us think is better for continual water transport, storage and use.
 

markr6

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Thinking your neoprene holster style would help keep drink cooler during the hot summer. I looked at the Nalgene water bottles at Target today. The polycarbonate (#7 plastic) was about $10, so thinking the honorable Treeguy does have the HDPE (#2) which a lot of us think is better for continual water transport, storage and use.

Yeah I would be surprised to see the HDPE in a retail store. I only see them online, probably because they're kinda ugly with that milky white color. They need the fancy purple, blue, green etc. transparent bright colors to sell in stores. They used to be polycarbonate but now made from Tritan. A "safer" plastic, until another 20 years passes and they say that causes ___(fill in the blank)___.
 

KITROBASKIN

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Yeah I would be surprised to see the HDPE in a retail store. I only see them online, probably because they're kinda ugly with that milky white color. They need the fancy purple, blue, green etc. transparent bright colors to sell in stores. They used to be polycarbonate but now made from Tritan. A "safer" plastic, until another 20 years passes and they say that causes ___(fill in the blank)___.

Interesting; the store Nalgene bottles are labeled BPA free #7, with #7 plastics being polycarbonate, Tritan, and others.
First exposure to Nalgene containers was in the latter 70's working at a primate research center. Flexible opaque plastic that a person would squeeze out a nozzle the Povidone Iodine that we used to clean our hands. Really old stiff Nalgene will get brittle and fail.
 
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MoTec

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I've been using a Thermos "Intak" water bottle at work to stay hydrated. It has a little dial so I can track how much I'm drinking, if I so choose. I've also used it on day-hikes and such because it has a ring on it that allows me to clip it to pack or ring with a carabiner.

When riding my mountain bike I use the Camelbak Podium water bottle. It's 'squeeze' activated so I can use one hand and don't have to fuss with opening it or anything. If it gets some dust or something in the nozzle I can turn it upside-down and squeeze to (somewhat) rinse it out before drinking.

Camping, I use a MSR 'dromedary' bag for water storage. I like that it collapses down flat and small when not in use. It uses the same size opening as the ubiquitous Nalgene bottles, of which I have a couple, also, but it has a smaller threaded opening and a flip down spout, too.
 

Booga

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Some big white plastic Nalgene bottle. Maybe 32 oz. Cost about $4.

I'm a Nalgene user too, I have two of the clear blue ones that I spotted in thrift stores for about £1 each and they've lasted me years. The leash for the lid eventually broke on one of them but it just means I have to hold the lid when I unscrew that one. I've seen replacement lids online so I might treat myself one day.

I also have a sipper insert that fits inside the mouth of the bottle.
 

markr6

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My latest bottle - $4 32oz UVPE Nalgene. Cheap, strong, simple, ugly, safe as far as I can tell. I can safely add boiling water for winter camping.
 

KITROBASKIN

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Wanted to give an update on the Cauldryn water heating portable bottle. It is great for its purpose. Without being able to access the internals, it does seem to not have any significant parasitic drain on the batteries. Most of these last few months have been utilizing the battery module as a power bank. Using it on iPads has been not smooth-sailing but it can be done. Android phone and battery chargers have been flawless. At some point here I will release a video review; want to sort out the power bank function.
 

Poppy

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Just like flashlights (different scenarios require different aspects of a light) Different Water bottles are used depending upon the particular situation.
Going left to right:
1. Commercially bottled water. I'll typically have half a case of water bottles in my trunk. During the winter months, I'll have ice water, that I might melt with the defrosters on my dash. During the summer months, I freeze a number of water bottles, and put some in the fridge. A couple of frozen bottles mixed with a few from the fridge, placed into a flexible cooler, will stay cool all day long, even in a very hot car.

2. I carry a single walled stainless "Subzero" bottle, I bought in Kmart for a couple of dollars. I carry that on my pack when I pretend that I am concerned about being in a possible "survival situation". Being single walled, it can be put into a fire, or held over one to sanitize water. When I carry that, I also carry my Altoids tin survival kit. It has dental floss for making a tripod, and wire to be used to hang the idk 16-20 OZ flask over the fire.

3. I'm a little surprised that no one mentioned a Nissan thermos. Are they out of style? Back in the day they were all the rage. At any rate, it is light weight, and keeps stuff hot, or cold for quite a bit. I have an insulated hip holster, like a fanny pack that will fit a water bottle, OR this Nissan thermos. It holds .47 liter, so it is good for short trips. It worked well for me at Disney where I could refill it regularly, and it stayed cold between refills.

4. The Old Tried and True, Stanley double walled stainless steel vacuum thermos. This one quart is big and heavy, but will last a life-time, and those of your grand-kids. It keeps chamomile tea and honey HOT, or at least satisfyingly warm, all day long. Great for car camping, or when humping your butt into the woods waiting for that particular buck to come along.

LOL... looking at that picture... they've all been around the block a few times :)
 
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