Weapon light discussion, (loosely) related topics welcome

kerneldrop

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Canik is excellent. Competition pistol out of the box. A guy named Nills Jonnason is one of the best shooters on the planet and he wins national events with a stock polymer Canik.

Funny thing with polymer vs steel is that when you put good shooters on a shot timer…there's really just a .03 second split difference in shots with polymer and most prefer the polymer.
 
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I recently reapplied for a concealed pistol permit due to deciding it would be prudent to start carrying again.

So, with that plan in mind, I also started shopping for a new smaller, sidearm to carry that would be more comfortable. Then, remembering that I owned a not-touched in a long while Beretta .380, I thought I'd consider it.

IMG_1306.JPG


I was very surprised by how much effort it took to cycle a round into the chamber. It's probably been 20 years since the last time I did so.
 

alpg88

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With proper ammo, even .380 can be effective. The gun is great by 1980 standards, but today you can get a smaller and a lighter gun that shots more powerful round.
 

Monocrom

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I recently reapplied for a concealed pistol permit due to deciding it would be prudent to start carrying again.

So, with that plan in mind, I also started shopping for a new smaller, sidearm to carry that would be more comfortable. Then, remembering that I owned a not-touched in a long while Beretta .380, I thought I'd consider it.

View attachment 63444

I was very surprised by how much effort it took to cycle a round into the chamber. It's probably been 20 years since the last time I did so.
Untouched for 20 years??
You're definitely going to want a proper gunsmith to tear her down, look her over, and tune her up. You can leave ammo untouched for 20 years (depending on where and how it was stored). But not a pistol. Especially not an automatic.
 

orbital

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Chance, saying this as a friend.

Save the $70~100 to have some guy put a few drops of lube on the slide and fire a few rounds though it & that is was perfectly fine all along.
Use that money and buy yourself a new 9mm pistol in the 4.0~4.5" barrel range // several boxes of ammo for about $600 total cost.

I'd give a suggestion, but that would make me look like a fanboy,,, I'm not a fanboy of any product

Since you didn't get that convertible, you have some extra cash:cool:
 

Monocrom

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Chance, saying this as a friend.

Save the $70~100 to have some guy put a few drops of lube on the slide and fire a few rounds though it & that is was perfectly fine all along.
Realistically, without an experienced gunsmith taking it apart, no one can say what the issue is. It could very well be a minor one. Sometimes it turns out more serious.
Use that money and buy yourself a new 9mm pistol in the 4.0~4.5" barrel range // several boxes of ammo for about $600 total cost.

I'd give a suggestion, but that would make me look like a fanboy,,, I'm not a fanboy of any product

Since you didn't get that convertible, you have some extra cash:cool:
He should have gotten the convertible. Chicks dig open-top rides. 😉
Also, I'll say it.... Smith & Wesson M&P 2.0 Subcompact.
 

iacchus

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Swamps of the Gulf Coast
I recently reapplied for a concealed pistol permit due to deciding it would be prudent to start carrying again.

So, with that plan in mind, I also started shopping for a new smaller, sidearm to carry that would be more comfortable. Then, remembering that I owned a not-touched in a long while Beretta .380, I thought I'd consider it.

View attachment 63444

I was very surprised by how much effort it took to cycle a round into the chamber. It's probably been 20 years since the last time I did so.
That 85F is a fine piece. You don't see them much anymore. Some of the best .380s made, for my money.

Those are Blowback actions (as opposed to recoil/locked breech). The barrel isn't part of the recoil mechanism. This necessitates a stronger recoil spring, and as such these models are known to be a bit stiff to hand cycle until they break in properly. There's simply less mass movement involved, so the spring has to do more duty than a more common recoil type.

I would suggest breaking it down and cleaning/lubing like you would after a range session. If all the springs are in good shape, there's very little reason to think it shouldn't function just fine. Your big worry after sitting in a safe for two decades is oil drying and caking and gumming up the works somewhere.

After it is back together, if it dry fires fine, go put a couplethree boxes of ammo through it. If it doesn't ease up to your liking, you might want to look into something w/ a recoil action. That should be significantly easier to hand cycle.
 
Joined
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Messages
10,824
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Pacific N.W.
+

Chance, saying this as a friend.

Save the $70~100 to have some guy put a few drops of lube on the slide and fire a few rounds though it & that is was perfectly fine all along.
Use that money and buy yourself a new 9mm pistol in the 4.0~4.5" barrel range // several boxes of ammo for about $600 total cost.

I'd give a suggestion, but that would make me look like a fanboy,,, I'm not a fanboy of any product
Thanks, orbital. I appreciate the advice. The pistol is due for a cleaning and some oil, but I don't think that will resolve the following issues, 1. It has a strong spring. 2. The top rail is narrow, so there's not much to get a purchase on. 3. Hand strength is not what it once was.

The slide isn't dragging or sluggish. It's merely "heavy".
IMG_5958.JPG




Since you didn't get that convertible, you have some extra cash:cool:
Nope, purchasing a convertible is not going to happen. If you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans. 🥹
 
Joined
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That 85F is a fine piece. You don't see them much anymore. Some of the best .380s made, for my money.

Those are Blowback actions (as opposed to recoil/locked breech). The barrel isn't part of the recoil mechanism. This necessitates a stronger recoil spring, and as such these models are known to be a bit stiff to hand cycle until they break in properly. There's simply less mass movement involved, so the spring has to do more duty than a more common recoil type.

I would suggest breaking it down and cleaning/lubing like you would after a range session. If all the springs are in good shape, there's very little reason to think it shouldn't function just fine. Your big worry after sitting in a safe for two decades is oil drying and caking and gumming up the works somewhere.

After it is back together, if it dry fires fine, go put a couplethree boxes of ammo through it. If it doesn't ease up to your liking, you might want to look into something w/ a recoil action. That should be significantly easier to hand cycle.
👆This. 😁:lovecpf:
 

KITROBASKIN

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Suggest you listen to orbital and iacchus. That fine looking piece is not so complicated you can't check it out yourself with some dismantling.

If you left completely loaded magazine(s) all these years, I suggest replacing those magazine springs.

After giving it some use, consider trading it for a lighter, more ergonomic, faster tool.

Or keep it. I wonder what it is worth?
 

SCEMan

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Treasure Valley, Idaho
Thanks, orbital. I appreciate the advice. The pistol is due for a cleaning and some oil, but I don't think that will resolve the following issues, 1. It has a strong spring. 2. The top rail is narrow, so there's not much to get a purchase on. 3. Hand strength is not what it once was.

The slide isn't dragging or sluggish. It's merely "heavy".
Thumb the hammer back (forum won't let me use the work c***k :rolleyes:), then cycle the slide.
Used this technique when cycling rounds to test feeding after 1911 ramp polishing back in my IPSC days.
 

knucklegary

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As long as the bore is clean, and it appears that way, I'd lube up slide and run a few target rounds through her?

Scrub the bore clean before and after..

Like Kitrio mentioned springs will "set" when leaving clips loaded. I never load clips with more than 3-4 rounds when around house
 

blinkjr

Newly Enlightened
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Oct 5, 2009
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Dayton, OH
Like Kitrio mentioned springs will "set" when leaving clips loaded. I never load clips with more than 3-4 rounds when around house
Uh, from all that I have read it's quite the opposite. Spring steel degrades from constant flexing. It has no "memory," so leaving mags loaded for a long period of time should have no negative effect on the operation of the magazine.
 

knucklegary

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No argument springs fatigue from usage.
My experience with mechanical springs, they 'set' from non usage. You'd know what I mean if you've ever torn down an old overhead valve motor. One that's been sitting dormant for years?

Weapon magazines are expendable.. If you're preparing for a government coup, then leave them fully stacked👍
 

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