what fuel system cleaner

2000xlt

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do you use if any

BG44k or chevron with techron , is it even necessary?
 

jzmtl

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I'd say don't bother, but if you got everything already gummed up, try seafoam. Also put some in your intake according to instruction, very nice smoke show.
 

scott.cr

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I did extensive research and testing of fuel system treatments about three years ago. In the end, the one that was the all-time champ of intake tract cleanliness was "Regane" by Gumout. It did a fabulous job of cleaning intake valves, and on throttle body injected cars, also did a fabulous job of cleaning the intake manifold runners. (On port injected cars, the intake should be pretty clean regardless, although sometimes they get oily and greasy depending on the PCV configuration and condition.)

However, I have seen problems using Regane on very dirty engines, specifically intake valves with a big "umbrella" of carbon buildup. If too large of a chunk of carbon breaks off, it can jam the valve open. Usually this is temporary, but it can cause no-start issues.

Since the information gained from my testing, gasoline formulations have probably changed. They are getting a lot cleaner than they were compared to the early and mid 1990s, and a lot of the time a fuel treatment isn't really necessary. Carbon still builds up, but the deposits are very small and probably don't affect air flow.

Also, the original engine design is a factor in carbon buildup. Any pre-~1994 car will be a more likely candidate for carbon buildup in my experience.

And if your car uses direct gasoline injection, fuel system treatments will be of no use whatsoever.
 

Diesel_Bomber

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Not a big fan of tune-up or engine-overhaul in a can. Only fuel in your fuel tank, oil in your crank case, the recommended tranny fluid in your tranny, etc. etc. If you have a specific problem and a shop is going to charge you $XXX to fix it, sure it might be worth a $10 can of mystery cure, but definitely no need for an additive all the time. If you find something you like and feel is worth the cost, more power to you.

(Note: In many cases a diesel fuel lubricant is not only a good idea but necessary, likewise anti-gel treatments.)

:buddies:
 

BIGIRON

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I don't think regular additives in gas engines are beneficial. I do think they (PowerService) help keep diesel fuel systems operating better, paticularly the older mechanical injector systems.

I have had a couple of instances where I think Techron Concentrate (not just the regular Techron) cleaned up a couple of gasoline injectors. But also a couple in instances when it had no noticable effect.

I have used Seafoam (which I think is basically acetone) and Berryman B-12 in older lacquered up automatic transmissions with some success.

Edit - Bomber, didn't you post a link to a very detailed study of diesel additives a year or so back??
 

Diesel_Bomber

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Nope, wasn't me, but I know the one you're talking about. It was HFRR results on diesel fuel lubricity additives. I'll see if I can find it.

:buddies:

Edit: Here. Thanks again BVH!
 
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Warhead

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Lucas fuel system treatment and upper cylinder lubricant pays for itself (even more so these days). I've been putting it in every time for nearly a decade. I have seen the results on internal parts, rebuilt race engines, and street engines...from the intake manifold, to the exhaust valves, you can't deny its effectiveness. I do the math on my fuel religiously and often it saves a little cash over and above its cost...not to mention keeping the top end of the engine pristine.
 

Diesel_Bomber

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No comment on Lucas fuel additive as I've never used it.

However, I've seen several differentials destroyed by Lucas. It increases the surface tension of the oil and destroys the anti-foaming ability of the oil. Air is good for lots of things but it's a lousy gear lube; foam is mostly air with very little oil. Foam is a great insulator though, great at keeping gears and bearings from cooling. :poof:

:buddies:
 
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NeonLights

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I've been using Techron for 10+ years on more than a dozen different cars. I usually don't bother on our newer cars, but our older cars with higher miles usually get a bottle once or twice a year. I've also used the Redline and Amsoil equivalents. Never worked any miracles for me, but I've never had any fuel related issues on any of the 20+ cars my wife and I have owned either.
 

VidPro

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i cleaned a carberator (you know them things they had a long time ago for fuel) with techron, just because i didnt have any other solvent, and it removed laquered up gum instantally, i was surprised.

then one time on an OLD crusty , gas had been sitting in it to long, cant get a good smog test car. i was noticing that the Throttle body injectors (that is a fuel injector shoved in a carberator) were driping , raw gas into the intake.
so (knowing that this techron gets the gum out) i ran techron in a low tank, and the injectors went from driping to spraying again :)

so for laqured up gum of a old gas beater, sitting out to long not using its gas, the techron cleaned the gas side up.
i have NO idea whatsoever if it does anything for carbon deposits and the rest of that stuff.

so because my cars often sit parked unused, and would get all gummed up, i use chevron fuel, and add techron every 3-4 years or so.
 
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Warhead

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+1 on that. Well known fact (but I guess not to some) Places that carry the larger line of Lucas have a pamphlet which contains a warning against using their oil additive(s) in the transmission or differentials. But of course suggests their gear lube. :)

I once saw a guy at the strip....the diff was foaming so badly (even just in 1/4 miles) that it was coming out of the differential vent, hit the exhaust and caught fire!!! Don't know if Lucas was in there, but wouldn't surprise me!

No comment on Lucas fuel additive as I've never used it.

However, I've seen several differentials destroyed by Lucas. It increases the surface tension of the oil and destroys the anti-foaming ability of the oil. Air is good for lots of things but it's a lousy gear lube; foam is mostly air with very little oil. Foam is a great insulator though, great at keeping gears and bearings from cooling. :poof:

:buddies:
 

orbital

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Few weeks ago we had a huge/heavy snow storm, so to get the most power from my Ariens snowblower, put about an ounce of Techron in the gas and topped it off. Ran like a top & saved my bacon.
Again yesterday had a big snow removal, put about an ounce of Techron in and topped off the gas,,,, just ran like a top.

Nothing in the tank since purchased about 7 seasons ago other than non-ethanol gas & those two ounces of Techron.
 
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alpg88

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Lucas additives are awesome for covering up problems in cars you trying to sell. It is NOT a permanent solution for problems. As far as cleaning, some shops will do their best to talk you into cleaning engine, fuel system, injectors, but more often than not, it does not improve anything, and in some cases it actually harms your car. Our shop not just does not offer that service, we recommend against it. If your runners, or throttle body is full of dirt, spraying stuff into it wont do much, the dirt will go farther in, those components need to be removed, and cleaned good, with a toothbrush, and in some cases a scraper. gaskets replaced, and idle speed controller/air bypass, is cleaned as as well, dirty lines are disconnected and flushed with solvent and compressed air, Dirt needs to be removed, not pushed farther in, we do not clean injectors, it is a scam, in rare case that they are clogged a lot, they are replaced. but it does not happen often, i'd say it is pretty rare occurrence.
 

kaichu dento

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Only additive I use is generic gas dryer, usually the cheapest bottles available and if you've got water in the tank due to running with low fill levels during warm/cool spells, it'll save you from ice blockages in the fuel lines.
 

orbital

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Figured I'd add to a thread, than start one similar.

The reason I used the Techron in my blower is not to clean my fuel system/carb, it was to get the most power out of my engine & total combustion.
If you use said additive, you notice your engine really running well, really well.
I needed every bit of horsepower for wet heavy/big snow removal... the load on the blower is massive and I need 105% power.

44K was mentioned & I used that in the 90s' in my Nissan truck, it's even better! .. now crazy expensive.
 

turbodog

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Question.... how do you _know_ it increases/increased the available power? Like know, not just hope for or assume?
 

orbital

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Question.... how do you _know_ it increases/increased the available power? Like know, not just hope for or assume?
+

In cars, you can feel a difference in acceleration. There's just more go to it.
Not a placebo thing at all.

With 44k, the difference is pronounced.
 

turbodog

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In cars, you can feel a difference in acceleration. There's just more go to it.
Not a placebo thing at all.

With 44k, the difference is pronounced.
But cars can adjust engine parameters based on octane.

Small engines are fixed. Higher octane actually works against performance unless the engine is built for it or can adjust for it.

So back to my question...
 
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