What Is The Purpose Of A 12 AA Cell Large Flashlight ??

billt460

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Oct 27, 2022
Messages
2
Location
Lake Havasu City, Arizona
I recently purchased this flashlight from Harbor Freight. It is an excellent flashlight for the money. It has both a "HIGH" setting, as well as a "LOW" setting. And it also has a, "SOS Strobe" setting. It is extremely bright and well made.

The only "problem" is, it takes 12, AA batteries in a removable pack. It could have been easier, (and possibly cheaper), if it had been designed to take 3 or 4 "C Cell" batteries. Or even multiple, "D Cells".

Does anyone know what is the purpose is of having so many smaller AA Cells? I would think it would last longer with the larger cells. Or is it a voltage issue of some type? Thanks in advance.

 

CarpentryHero

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 4, 2010
Messages
3,075
Location
Edmonton
Usually it’s a cheap way a manufacturer can get the voltage up, though some could be in series and some parallel in the same light.
The AA batteries would probably sag less the d cells especially if you have four doing the job of one
 

alpg88

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
4,182
voltage increase so they can install more powerful led, using common batteries widely available everywhere.
 

snakebite

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 17, 2001
Messages
2,665
Location
dayton oh
Sell lots of aa cells.
Really its to get 12v for a quad die led without li-ion.
Time to order some ikealoops!
 

alpg88

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
4,182
This is not a bad set up in general. 12aa. i build a triple p7 maglite that runs on 12aa 13-14 years ago, take it camping all the time. i can use nimh AAs, It is also dual bored to accept 18650 side by side, i have a 6x18650 holder for it, it would give me much more runtime, but i almost never used it. I seldom use this light now, due to weight and size, but back when i build it, it was used a lot, it would light up entire campsite. there were very few lights that could match it back then. There was a member here years ago Der Witchel, he used to make and sell 3xp7, and later 3xml kits with drivers for maglites.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_5525.JPG
    IMG_5525.JPG
    294.2 KB · Views: 21
  • IMG_5527.JPG
    IMG_5527.JPG
    138.5 KB · Views: 20

Flashlightmaster2021

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Oct 18, 2021
Messages
78
Location
USA
I recently purchased this flashlight from Harbor Freight. It is an excellent flashlight for the money. It has both a "HIGH" setting, as well as a "LOW" setting. And it also has a, "SOS Strobe" setting. It is extremely bright and well made.

The only "problem" is, it takes 12, AA batteries in a removable pack. It could have been easier, (and possibly cheaper), if it had been designed to take 3 or 4 "C Cell" batteries. Or even multiple, "D Cells".

Does anyone know what is the purpose is of having so many smaller AA Cells? I would think it would last longer with the larger cells. Or is it a voltage issue of some type? Thanks in advance.

to make you spend more money $$$$$??????
 

billt460

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Oct 27, 2022
Messages
2
Location
Lake Havasu City, Arizona
I have since purchased this flashlight as well. It has a 4 cell AA power pack. It offers 3 settings. "HIGH", "MEDIUM", and "LOW". And it is quite bright on it's highest setting. It's a nice flashlight for the money.

A bit off topic, but which Alkaline AA Batteries do you guys find to be the best as far as not leaking? I ask because last year I purchased a "72 Pack", of Ray-O-Vac AA's at Lowe's, and within 4 months over half of them started leaking right in the container they were packaged in. A white crumbly powder started emerging from the ends of the cells.

The other day I bought 2, "16 Packs" of Eveready AA's. They claim a 10 year shelf life. It seems ALL AA's purchased today seem more prone to leakage than the same batteries purchased 20 years ago.

Back then I left several Duracell AA's in a old Canon 35 MM power winder, for an older Canon A-1, 35 MM film camera. It thought for certain they would have leaked. But they didn't. They swelled up a bit, but all were easily removed, and nothing internally was damaged.

And they were in the power winder for almost 2 decades. Alkaline AA batteries today would have leaked everywhere in less than 3 years. It seems battery quality has gone to hell.

 

HarryN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 22, 2004
Messages
3,955
Location
Pleasanton (Bay Area), CA, USA
It is very easy to purchase high quality Li primary cells in AA at any retail store, but nearly impossible to buy them in any other size.

Similarly, it is very easy to find high quality AA NiMH cells with a wide range of discharge vs capacity curves, but more challenging in other battery sizes.

As an example of what is possible in AA cells, look at AACycler.


Most people own at least some devices at home that use AAs, so with some effort you can have most of the devices run one common battery size.

So in general, that what makes them interesting.
 

HarryN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 22, 2004
Messages
3,955
Location
Pleasanton (Bay Area), CA, USA
I have since purchased this flashlight as well. It has a 4 cell AA power pack. It offers 3 settings. "HIGH", "MEDIUM", and "LOW". And it is quite bright on it's highest setting. It's a nice flashlight for the money.

A bit off topic, but which Alkaline AA Batteries do you guys find to be the best as far as not leaking? I ask because last year I purchased a "72 Pack", of Ray-O-Vac AA's at Lowe's, and within 4 months over half of them started leaking right in the container they were packaged in. A white crumbly powder started emerging from the ends of the cells.

The other day I bought 2, "16 Packs" of Eveready AA's. They claim a 10 year shelf life. It seems ALL AA's purchased today seem more prone to leakage than the same batteries purchased 20 years ago.

Back then I left several Duracell AA's in a old Canon 35 MM power winder, for an older Canon A-1, 35 MM film camera. It thought for certain they would have leaked. But they didn't. They swelled up a bit, but all were easily removed, and nothing internally was damaged.

And they were in the power winder for almost 2 decades. Alkaline AA batteries today would have leaked everywhere in less than 3 years. It seems battery quality has gone to hell.



In general, don't buy alkaline cells. It seems like eventually they will all leak.

Switch to either Li primary cells or a Ni based rechargeable cell.
 
Top