What is the Rolex of Flashlights?

Buff

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So someone said in that story that he had to get his dad's Rolex serviced because it stopped and he just put it in the original box? Something about it now runs fine?
Think i'll let my son do that i'll just enjoy wearing it…..😂😂😂
 

Monocrom

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I am fine with a total overhaul. It is their simplest movement. It's a tool.
Not the movement that's the issue. You can have a complex or simple one. Doesn't matter. The oil inside needed on all mechanical watches, after 25 years, you're guaranteed that's it's going to be a thick syrup-like mess. Just saying. Don't be shocked at the massive price the watcher-maker quotes you to completely restore it properly.
 

Monocrom

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So someone said in that story that he had to get his dad's Rolex serviced because it stopped and he just put it in the original box? Something about it now runs fine?
Think i'll let my son do that i'll just enjoy wearing it…..😂😂😂
Massive, complete overhaul/restoration. Definitely not cheap!
The son was honest that his dad didn't know that Rolex watches need servicing. A case of simple, genuine ignorance on his dad's part.
 

ItnStln

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Several years back. Though thankfully the buyer didn't make too many changes. Unfortunately just enough that a lot of the regulars who made the forums fun to visit, left.
That probably explains the changes I've noticed. I haven't been as active as I used to be.
 

desert.snake

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One thing you learn quickly with this hobby..... Literally everyone can do bright and cheap. It's like the Working Girls standing on street corners. You get Gorgeous and Cheap. And that is literally ALL you get! You don't get quality and durability, extreme reliability tossed in for free. High lumen count means nothing! I made a topic about this a few months back. My absolute favorite light, emitter literally burned out! A fellow CPFer pointed out that the emitter being used was horribly over-driven far beyond what it should have been. And clearly, the protection circuit inside the light, failed miserably!

SureFire intentionally keeps lumen output a bit lower than other brands because they know their customers prefer extreme reliability and toughness over just BRIGHT AS HELL! output.
They are clearly trying to keep the lights from being too bright, but not from overheating. Even the newest ones still have an aluminum board for the diode:(
 

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desert.snake

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Not the movement that's the issue. You can have a complex or simple one. Doesn't matter. The oil inside needed on all mechanical watches, after 25 years, you're guaranteed that's it's going to be a thick syrup-like mess. Just saying. Don't be shocked at the massive price the watcher-maker quotes you to completely restore it properly.
If it's just the oil, then what's the problem with flushing it and adding new oil yourself? Maybe even something silicone that doesn't harden over time
 

NeilP

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Not read through all pages of this thread, but the Overready BOSS lights must fall in this catsgory

 
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If it's just the oil, then what's the problem with flushing it and adding new oil yourself? Maybe even something silicone that doesn't harden over time
It's not just the oil. A mechanical watch needs to be disassembled and its individual parts cleaned of lube, microscopic metal particles, dust and other things I'm sure I haven't listed. Disassembly is done by hand, and the cleaning is done by soaking the parts in a cleaning solution and perhaps ultrasonically. Parts that are worn out, damaged or corroded need to be replaced or possibly repaired. The newer lubes are superior to some from the past, but they need to be applied to specific points in the movement as lube is detrimental in some areas. I'm still a newb at this subject, so hopefully someone else will chime in.
 

ilikeguns40

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IMG_0171.jpeg

Men wear G shocks. Sissy boys wear Rolex's

G shocks are better, you won't change my mind.

Some high priced lights like HDS in titanium, copper, brass, and SS would be my pick. A flashlight would have to have a custom driver that no one else has to replicate a flashlight to Rolex in house movement comparison
 
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bykfixer

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It's not just the oil. A mechanical watch needs to be disassembled and its individual parts cleaned of lube, microscopic metal particles, dust and other things I'm sure I haven't listed. Disassembly is done by hand, and the cleaning is done by soaking the parts in a cleaning solution and perhaps ultrasonically. Parts that are worn out, damaged or corroded need to be replaced or possibly repaired. The newer lubes are superior to some from the past, but they need to be applied to specific points in the movement as lube is detrimental in some areas. I'm still a newb at this subject, so hopefully someone else will chime in.
You are spot on. I looked into the idea of DIY a few years back because labor has gotten so dang expensive. I was looking at $200+ just to clean and lube old watches by Elgin and other low end classics that have stopped working. I really like the looks of the 1960's Sportsman but parts are hard to find if lube wasn't able to fix the issue. When my Sieko Evel Knievel watch stopped working I just decided not to invest in the tools to do watch repairs beyond simple stuff like batteries or band replacements.
 
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You are spot on. I looked into the idea of DIY a few years back because labor has gotten so dang expensive. I was looking at $200+ just to clean and lube old watches by Elgin and other low end classics that have stopped working. I really like the looks of the 1960's Sportsman but parts are hard to find if lube wasn't able to fix the issue. When my Sieko Evel Knievel watch stopped working I just decided not to invest in the tools to do watch repairs beyond simple stuff like batteries or band replacements.
It is my understanding that the cost of repairs on less expensive mechanical watches has relegated them to the endlessly growing list of our society's throw-away items. As such, I make use of the grey market (like Amazon) for these watches and purchase from Authorized Dealers only the timepieces I hope to keep for a lifetime. The only "repairs" I do is regulating movements on a timegrapher. If money and spare parts were not an issue, I would probably love "watchmaking."
 
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