What was your prep for today?

Stefano

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Yesterday I bought another 15L water tank.
Also bought drill bits and many nails of various sizes if I had to improvise chicken coop in the small tool shed I have in the garden
 

orbital

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Picking up another deep cycle battery today. Paired with a small inverter, I can keep stuff going at night without running my generator if need be...
+

And something like this would charge that deep cell right back up at lowish cost.
>> Just need to make cables from your battery to controller.



 

Poppy

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I have a few of this style gas can. They would be easier to use if the nozzle is an inch or two longer. This would allow the nozzle to reach into our car's gas filler port more easily.

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In prep for possible power outages, (now that we are full swing into hurricane season, and ofcourse the up coming winter with possible outages,) I want to freshen up my storage supply of fuel.

I bought a funnel, to aid in pouring gas from those cans into our cars, so that I can put fresh gas into the cans.

Also, I started and ran both generators for their seasonal prep.
 

Romanko

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Ukraine, Kyiv
Talked to my friend about possible blackouts because of missile attacks at power plants. Hi said that a led in his smartphone is enough. Also he has no power banks. Don't know what to say.
 
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Stefano

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Talked to my friend about possible blackouts because of missile attacks at power plants. Hi said that a led in his smartphone is enough. Also he has no power banks. Don't know what to say.
This does not surprise me, I have seen hikers (with family) face the dark in the woods or mountains without a flashlight and replying "we have smartphones"
He may be looking for a missile attack app on his phone.
 

bykfixer

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Millions of people using a cellular phone for a flashlight says they must be pretty good at being flashlights.
Just sayin'.
Now we here at CPF know better but the lenmings and sheeple don't.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Dec 13, 2007
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I finished a small hydroponics system I built with a couple 2x4’s, some scrap aluminum from a broken greenhouse, some soda bottles, some aluminum tool boxes, and a 5 gallon Home Depot bucket. Used two large tool boxes as the higher end base and one large and one smaller tool box for the lower end base. Screwed two pieces of scrap aluminum to 2x4’s perpendicular to tool boxes to act as rails to hold soda bottles up (having one side lower than the other). I cut holes in soda bottles (1 1/8 inch in bottom with hole saw, 3/4 inch in cap with unibit, and 2 2 inch holes in side with razor knife and scissors). Then I connected the bottles together end to end by putting the top of the bottle through the hole I drilled in the bottom of another and reaching in the closest 2 inch hole with a cap and screwing it on tight. I did this for 7 bottles. I placed the bottles on the aluminum rails with 2 inch holes facing up. Then I Tech screwed a piece of tie wire to the rail, wrapped the wire around the bottle neck, then tech screwed it to the rail on the other side of the bottle. I did this for each bottle to act as a strap so they didn’t move or slide down. After running tubing for the water pump through the wire straps, I drilled a hole in the top bottle and inserted the tubing. I put the 4 watt submersible pump in a Home Depot bucket full of water and connected the tubing and plugged it in to power. I put 2 inch plant cups in the bottle holes and let the water run. Had to turn the bottles sideways some so the cups would be dipped in the water when the pump ran but not when it stopped. Then I added plants that had been started growing in rock wool cubes in the cups and put some type of clay balls over them. Added a type a and b liquid fertilizer to the water and a little PH Down. Hopefully all that work will yield some good food in the near future.
 

Romanko

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Looks like there were some hits at power plants. Right now I have electricity. But some parts of Kyiv hasn't (I've read in social media).
 

Poppy

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The low temps are dropping to the high 30's F. So yesterday I planned on draining my garden hoses. I didn't feel well, so I didn't get to it.

This morning there was frost on my windshield.

Today, I blew out and drained my hoses, and blew out the lines that go to the hoses. I then filled them with RV antifreeze. I use a 2 gallon bug sprayer, that I put an air hose connector onto the spray hose. Works well!
 

Poppy

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Looks like there were some hits at power plants. Right now I have electricity. But some parts of Kyiv hasn't (I've read in social media).
I'm really sorry to see what is going on in your country.
I hope that your country, and the rest of Europe can get through the winter without too much difficulty.
 

bykfixer

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8B5E6170-25E5-47E3-B0BE-51B9BFE179A9.jpeg

Putin Sucks

My prep for today began last night when I drank extra water, knowing I'd be sweating today and if I didn't, muscle cramps would probably result.
 
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orbital

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+

Been putting off looking at my snowblower,, haven't touched it since last season.

Pulled it out and topped off the gas;
connected the extension cord for the electric start, put on the choke and primed it 4~5 times.

It fired up instantly, not having to do the start sequence a couple of times, it started instantly and idled smooth.
The only reason I put off till today to run it, was being confidant the carb & fuel system wasn't a mess.

I only use non-ethanol gas for everything I own and your machinery will thank you. Having non-ethanol gas is the prep here.

Also, sprayed every possible friction point & friction surface with Tri-Flow,, went a bit nutso with it...🎯
 

Stress_Test

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Feb 18, 2008
Messages
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So, there's some seriously cold weather on the way in my region. Looks like some parts of the US are already dealing with it, but it hasn't hit here yet. Forecast is for possible single-digit temps and windchill below zero! :eek:

I know some of y'all might just call that a normal winter day but round here it's more like a once-every-ten-years event.

So, I've started jotting down a few notes for a to-do list before Friday. Stock up on food and water first, obviously, then, in no particular order:

1. Charge/condition the old spare car battery that I keep in the closet as a just-in-case.

2. Pick up some sand bags to put in the trunk of the car (for weight over the rear tires mainly, and also to spread on slick spots)

3. Install new windshield wiper blades on the car. The current ones are old and mostly just skip and squawk over the glass.

4. Top off the water level in the car battery if needed. Crazy as it seems for a 2007 car, it has an old-school, non-sealed battery with vent caps.

5. Smear some silicone lube or something on the car door weather strip seals, so the door doesn't freeze shut so solidly if we get snow / freezing rain.

6. Verify that my car 12-volt to A.C. adapter still works. That thing has sat in the glovebox for years without being used.

7. Take care of a couple things for my dad: buy him one of those thermal reflective tarps/blankets that's aluminized on one side (they work really well!). Check the tree branches and stuff round his place to make sure nothing's going to fall off and be in the way, and remove it now if so. Get him some sand and/or de-icer for the walkways, porch, etc.

Not going to even mention lighting prep, because probably anyone registered on this forum already has enough emergency lighting to outlast everything else!

But chime in if there are any other good cold-weather preparations. (I live in an apartment unfortunately so I'm kinda limited on some things)
 

Monocrom

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Get a large bag of kitty litter to keep in the trunk. Helps with regaining traction if you get stuck. A telescoping snow-shovel is another good idea to help dig out if you're stuck. Based on #2 I'm guessing you have a rear-wheel drive car. Honestly, if you don't have to go out when the storm hits.... don't. Just not worth it. Call in sick, or use some PTO days. Main reason why, other drivers in your neck of the woods won't be prepared. They'll be out on the roads. Endangering your life and others, including their own while underestimating how bad it'll likely be. Heck, some folks think 4-wheel drive means they have 4-wheel stop too. Nope!
 

Stress_Test

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Feb 18, 2008
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Yeah don't worry, if there's snow falling or on the way I try to get home soon as possible then don't go anywhere. A few times I've been at work when it started snowing heavily and they turned everybody loose at once. The drive home one time was pretty much terrifying. After that time, I plan to leave before the roads start getting slick.

Forgot about the snow shovel. I actually could've used one last year to help clean off the car and remove the piles of snow from around it before they re-froze overnight.

On a side note.... man, I've just been searching the Lowes and Home Depot web sites to see what they actually have in the store. Would you believe they don't show to have any thermal blankets or snow shovels in stock?? The only thing they had were those cheapo single-use thin emergency mylar blankets. The brick-and-mortar stores have done a lot of bitching and whining about how people buy stuff on Amazon but for cryin out loud guys you have to actually STOCK useful stuff in your stores if you want people to shop there!! < grumble grumble >
 

Poppy

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So, there's some seriously cold weather on the way in my region. Looks like some parts of the US are already dealing with it, but it hasn't hit here yet. Forecast is for possible single-digit temps and windchill below zero! :eek:

I know some of y'all might just call that a normal winter day but round here it's more like a once-every-ten-years event.

So, I've started jotting down a few notes for a to-do list before Friday. Stock up on food and water first, obviously, then, in no particular order:

1. Charge/condition the old spare car battery that I keep in the closet as a just-in-case.

2. Pick up some sand bags to put in the trunk of the car (for weight over the rear tires mainly, and also to spread on slick spots)

3. Install new windshield wiper blades on the car. The current ones are old and mostly just skip and squawk over the glass.

4. Top off the water level in the car battery if needed. Crazy as it seems for a 2007 car, it has an old-school, non-sealed battery with vent caps.

5. Smear some silicone lube or something on the car door weather strip seals, so the door doesn't freeze shut so solidly if we get snow / freezing rain.

6. Verify that my car 12-volt to A.C. adapter still works. That thing has sat in the glovebox for years without being used.

7. Take care of a couple things for my dad: buy him one of those thermal reflective tarps/blankets that's aluminized on one side (they work really well!). Check the tree branches and stuff round his place to make sure nothing's going to fall off and be in the way, and remove it now if so. Get him some sand and/or de-icer for the walkways, porch, etc.

Not going to even mention lighting prep, because probably anyone registered on this forum already has enough emergency lighting to outlast everything else!

But chime in if there are any other good cold-weather preparations. (I live in an apartment unfortunately so I'm kinda limited on some things)
I like your list of preps!

During winter months I add a long handled shovel in my trunk.
In fact I didn't remove it this summer.
I also add a sleeping bag.
A length of 1/2 inch or 5/8 inch line/rope.

I always have a plastic coffee can/urinal that holds hand sanitizer, a partial roll of TP, some plastic bags, and gloves.
I keep a set of winter wear in the car, including: my old three season coat (it is a gortex shell, with a zip in fleece liner) with gloves in the pockets. A set of gortex insulated bibs, a fleece hat, and an extra fleece (or two) shirts.

I keep a spare set of dry socks, and some ultra thin plastic bags, (like the ones you can get in the grocery store to put vegetables in, or packaged meat). The thin bags can go over dry socks, and be used as a water proof liner inside my shoes.

I used to keep a bag of trail mix, but I haven't done that in a while.
I generally have 6-12 bottles of water. Even if they are frozen, when placed on the dash with the defrosters on, they eventually melt.

I never go below 1/4 tank of gas, but with impending poor weather, I top it off sooner, and stay above 1/2 tank.

If there is freezing rain, I don't go out.

I keep a charged battery pack in the glove compartment, and swapped my cigar lighter port with a hard wired two port USB output for charging my phone with, or without my ignition turned on.

I might still have a three wick canned candle in my SHTF sack (for heat)
I certainly have a couple of those $3 mylar sheets. And big black garbage bags.

My prep today was to apply some silicone grease to the weather stripping of my driver's car door, for the same reason that you stated. Moisture seeps in, and freezes, and makes it next to impossible to get the door opened. I'ved used WD40 in the past, but think that the grease will hold up longer.

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Poppy

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Northern New Jersey
Considering that you are looking at a possibility of single digit temps you may need to take precautions that some of us do each winter.

For example, you will need to protect your outside garden faucets from freezing:
google "outside water faucet weather shield"
It is also a good idea to shut the water off from the inside of your house, and drain the outside faucet.
If you have any water pipes going through an unheated space, you may want to apply "heat tape" and insulate around it.
I had a bathroom sink mounted on an external wall, and if the temps went below 16F its feed lines would freeze. If however, if I left the doors to the cabinet open, and allowed the water to drip, it wouldn't freeze. I later discovered that the wall was uninsulated and by injecting insulating foam, that solved the problem.
 

Stress_Test

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Feb 18, 2008
Messages
1,126
Thanks Poppy, that's a good list of info. I'm in an apartment so I only have to make sure I leave taps dripping, but my dad has a house with a crawl-space and outside water faucets, so I'll be sure to remind him. I think he foam-wrapped those the last time it got that cold but I can't remember.

We did have the external wall water line problem in one of our rooms at work. No insulation in the wall, same as yours. Couple years back it got cold enough to freeze those pipes and crack them, then they flooded the room when the temps warmed up again. Big mess!

Anyway, I thought about the sleeping bag for the car, but a while back I stashed a tarp with a mylar / aluminized side on it in the trunk. I have previously tried it out to wrap up in, and it is really warm. I tried it on the bed as a layer between the bedsheet and the blanket, and the problem was that it traps moisture, so I woke up damp in the morning. It was really warm to sleep under though! I think it might work if you just kind of loosely draped it over the top of everything else. If I was stuck and had to sit in the car a while, I think I'd do okay with the heavy coat I'd have, gloves, boots, and the tarp draped around me.

I'll try to find one of the cheapo emergency blankets for my dad to have on hand. I was just thinking about if the power goes out mainly. I don't think he has much if any firewood to use, and at his age he gets cold easily.

I've been keeping a couple of rope sizes in the trunk for a while just in case. Got 3/8", some 1/2" and 5/8". Thought that the 1/2 or 5/8 might be useful if I was just slightly stuck on a slick spot or grass or whatever and needed only a minor tow to get out. Or if there was a big tree limb in the way that was too big to lift, I might tie it to the car and drag it out of the way. Last year there actually was a great big limb that dropped into the street by my building, but shortly after, a pickup truck stopped and a huge guy got out and dragged that limb out of the road by hand.

And on a slightly humorous note on towing: back in the Spring I was looking at tow strap options on Amazon, and happened to come across a big honkin Lift-All web sling (used to hoist stuff from a crane and so forth). I was familiar with that brand since that's what our guys use at work all the time.

This monster is a sewn loop 18ft long and 4 inch wide polyester, and the price was something absurdly low, like 20 bucks or something. (I suspect now maybe it was a pricing error)

It was probably one of the most silly impulse-buys I've ever made, but for that price I just couldn't resist!

It's been hanging in my closet but I think it's time to throw it in the car trunk now. That'll make a heck of a tow-strap! I still chuckle when I look at the thing. It could pick up my car plus two more just like it, and still be within the safe working limit!! LOL

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