What watch you're wearing?

GadgetGeek

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Jul 31, 2010
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New Jersey
Those Eco Drive pretty much run forever in my experience. Maybe once a year I'll have to charge one by a window for a little while because it's been out of my rotation for a very long time. If worn, ambient light keeps them going a long time.
 

kaichu dento

Flashaholic
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Apr 5, 2008
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6,554
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現在の世界
Mainly a Seiko guy; have a few that all keep very accurate time.
The black Kinetic I'm wearing has only come off my wrist maybe 10 times in the past 7~8 years... I just don't bother taking it off.
I've got a Seiko Kinetic I bought used probably 10 years ago and it keeps going into non-usage mode whenever I replace, only to come back out again. So reliable, and fun to watch the hands start spinning when it gets moved. Being titanium, it feels like there's no watch even there, and when I got the Grand Seiko in stainless I was happy to find that due to the 38mm size, it feels fairly close to the same.
Bought a simple design, titanium Citizen* off ebay several years ago, it's an ecodrive.
I charge it across my room with my tightest beam thrower on medium
LoL, I like it.

I used to charge the lume on my watch while doing tours by reaching over the windshield on my snowmachine and getting it in front of the headlight. Didn't take more than a second or two to make it plenty bright!
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
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19,622
Location
NYC
I charge up my Eco-Drive Citizen by...... shining my flashlights at the dial. Usually on Turbo mode. And, after 30 seconds, I have an excellent hand-warmer too. :grin2:
 

rwolfenstein

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Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
531
1000008267.jpg


I decided to wear this gem today.
 

rwolfenstein

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Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
531
❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️ the fuel gauge.
Details please. What model #, what year it was made,
Thanks

Its discontinued, dunno what year they stopped making them.
 

Galane

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Joined
Jul 6, 2022
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163
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Idaho
A timepiece to watch out for is a Casio touch screen calculator watch. These 1980's watches came in two styles. One had a virtual keyboard on its display which somehow had quite good fat finger rejection so it was decently easy to poke the numbers. I bought one at a thrift store for 50 cents, popped a new battery in and sold it for $50.

The other style was rather innovative in its method of operation. You drew the numbers and operators on the watch face with a fingertip.

I've only ever seen the one in person. How I recognized it was from an article in a 1980's issue of Popular Science or Popular Mechanics. The 70's and 80's for both of those magazines were their prime years, when they were all about science and technology for the sake of it, no political bolshoi.

I haven't worn a watch since I last had a job working for someone else, which was over 20 years ago. I was on my second Timex Indiglo. After coming home from my last day on the job I took it off and let it sit. No idea where it is now.

The reason it was the second watch was the first one the chrome peeled off the crown and it'd cut my wrist, and the switch mechanism for the backlight broke. The only way it would work was pulling the crown out to the setting position, then pushing it in. It would click and light, but release and press again, no light. I didn't even want the backlight, but the shop didn't have any other watch that did nothing but tell the time.

The first battery lasted 10 years in the first watch. I stopped wearing the second one while its original battery was still licking, er, ticking.
 

bykfixer

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Joined
Aug 9, 2015
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20,252
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John 3:16
A timepiece to watch out for is a Casio touch screen calculator watch. These 1980's watches came in two styles. One had a virtual keyboard on its display which somehow had quite good fat finger rejection so it was decently easy to poke the numbers. I bought one at a thrift store for 50 cents, popped a new battery in and sold it for $50.

The other style was rather innovative in its method of operation. You drew the numbers and operators on the watch face with a fingertip.

I've only ever seen the one in person. How I recognized it was from an article in a 1980's issue of Popular Science or Popular Mechanics. The 70's and 80's for both of those magazines were their prime years, when they were all about science and technology for the sake of it, no political bolshoi.

I haven't worn a watch since I last had a job working for someone else, which was over 20 years ago. I was on my second Timex Indiglo. After coming home from my last day on the job I took it off and let it sit. No idea where it is now.

The reason it was the second watch was the first one the chrome peeled off the crown and it'd cut my wrist, and the switch mechanism for the backlight broke. The only way it would work was pulling the crown out to the setting position, then pushing it in. It would click and light, but release and press again, no light. I didn't even want the backlight, but the shop didn't have any other watch that did nothing but tell the time.

The first battery lasted 10 years in the first watch. I stopped wearing the second one while its original battery was still licking, er, ticking.
My old boss kept contemplating retirement. Apparently one Sunday evening the battery played out on his favorite watch. He went to put it on that Monday morning and saw it had stopped.

He called his boss and said "Friday was my last day, I won't be in today or ever for that matter". Boss asked why the sudden decision. He replied "I promised my wife I'd retire the day my watch stops".

When my dad retired he removed every clock in the house but one. He said "only 3 times I care about are day time, night time and Price is Right time."
 
Joined
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Caught in an air duct
I've owned that model before, mine had the green marathon rubber strap, looked sharp, beast of a watch. Has all the solid features you would need in an automatic. Loved the vanilla smell on those bands.
Lol. This one came with black rubber vanilla straps that are currently freshening the air in my spare straps box! Whenever I open it, I think "Hey! This smells edible!" Then I remember why and spit them back out. :p
 
Joined
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Caught in an air duct
20240214_223851.jpg


An updated re-issue of one of the remaining brands of "Dirty Dozen" field watches from WWII. Vertex is currently run by the great grandson of the gentleman who held the reins during The War. The "crow's foot" that looks like an arrow to us Yanks represents the British Ministry of Defence (not Defense ;)) for whom the watches were made. The small seconds sub-dial was demanded by the MoD to ensure that the troops would not confuse the minutes and seconds hands during the stresses of combat. It is interesting to note that the applied numerals are made entirely of solid lume material that glows bright and long. This model is the M100AC. The "C" stands for "Covert" in reference to the black DLC finish. Definitely a keeper.
 
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