What watch you're wearing?

DHart

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Very underrated brand, in my opinion.
Great looking pilot's watch, my friend.
Thank you, Monochrome.. very kind of you to say.

I agree, you don't hear a lot about Aristo, as they are a very small company of German craftsmen - perhaps just a handful or two of craftsmen (people). The brand has a long German history of good quality work.
 

bykfixer

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IMG_5839.jpeg

1959 Gruen linen dial.
The "6" is a Gruen "G".
 

Flying Turtle

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I'm still sporting a 10+ year old Seiko 5. Right now it's doing fine, though it does lose about a minute a day. Recently I thought it was done when it started galloping. Applied numerous doses of percussive maintenance, and it finally settled down. I realize it's probably at the end of it's life. Probably some professional service is in order, but that would likely cost more than I paid for the watch ($50).

Geoff

Seiko.jpg
 

Monocrom

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I'm still sporting a 10+ year old Seiko 5. Right now it's doing fine, though it does lose about a minute a day. Recently I thought it was done when it started galloping. Applied numerous doses of percussive maintenance, and it finally settled down. I realize it's probably at the end of it's life. Probably some professional service is in order, but that would likely cost more than I paid for the watch ($50).

Geoff

View attachment 63372
Honestly, an independent watch-maker would simply remove the old movement, discard it, and replace it with either a new one or a refurbished one. They honestly don't think it's worth the bother of actually trying to fix up the existing movement on those older Seiko 5s.
 
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I'm still sporting a 10+ year old Seiko 5. Right now it's doing fine, though it does lose about a minute a day. Recently I thought it was done when it started galloping. Applied numerous doses of percussive maintenance, and it finally settled down. I realize it's probably at the end of it's life. Probably some professional service is in order, but that would likely cost more than I paid for the watch ($50).

Geoff

Sounds like your "percussive maintenance" succeeded in unsticking the hairspring from aging lube. (Just my best guess. It's a common issue.) Magnetism could also be the culprit, generally speaking, but that wouldn't go away by giving the watch a smack.
+1 on what Monocrom said.
 

Monocrom

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In the very unlikely event that it may have gotten magnatized, you can get cheap de-magnitizers (for watches) off of eBay.
 

Flying Turtle

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I try very hard to not let the watch get near a magnet, but it could have happened. I've also wondered if I should get the back off and put a little good oil in there. Or, I could just keep smacking it when it misbehaves.

Geoff
 
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I try very hard to not let the watch get near a magnet, but it could have happened. I've also wondered if I should get the back off and put a little good oil in there. Or, I could just keep smacking it when it misbehaves.

Geoff
You will likely do more harm than good by adding oil if you do not know where to apply it. There are parts of the movement (such as the hairspring) which will be adversely affected by lubrication. (I think oil migrated onto your hairspring which should normally be dry.) Also, you would need to use a proper horological lube, and the movement should really be cleaned before lubing to do a truly proper job. And that's assuming that no parts need replacing. Since you do not seem to be at a "nothing left to lose" point, I would suggest living with the watch as it is now rather than risking any DIY work. Losing a minute per day, as you described it, is not within spec for that movement, but considering its age and need for professional maintenance I would NOT say it's functioning horribly. (I have a Hamilton that had been running IIRC at minus 41 sec/day fresh out of the box. I regulated it on a time grapher to correct it, but my point is that that was a Swiss movement that somehow passed QC.) If your watch has sentimental value or if you just really like the watch a whole lot, I would have it serviced professionally, which, as stated earlier by Monocrom, would almost certainly result in the movement being replaced. Considering that you paid $50 for the watch (Oh, the good old days) I promise you that any work you have done to it professionally will cost significantly more than the original value of the piece. One thing I don't know is whether a new Seiko 5 of your liking would cost more or less than servicing your current piece. Hopefully my verbose and somewhat presumptuous tirade has yielded at least a modicum of worthwhile incite for you.
 
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bykfixer

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I have a couple of old watches that came from estate sales and were glitchy at first but with regular use became normal. It's often times where the old oil is sticky so the little gears and gadgets don't operate smoothly.

Bottom line is you either live with it or take it to have it serviced, which these days can be upward of a couple hundred dollars. Watch doctors are like an honest politician these days... getting more rare each time one retires.

If you whack it too many times it may break something. An don't just spray inside with wd40.
 

Monocrom

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I try very hard to not let the watch get near a magnet, but it could have happened. I've also wondered if I should get the back off and put a little good oil in there. Or, I could just keep smacking it when it misbehaves.

Geoff
Automatic/mechanical watches have a universal weird quirk.... they can sometimes work perfectly well on the outside, or just lose a few seconds per day; while getting absolutely destroyed and wrecked on the inside due to lack of oil.

No clue how that's possible. But it's a common enough issue that it's well known. Don't just keep smacking it. If you think it needs oil, it likely does. Don't take the back off yourself and try to oil it. Watches require a specialized oiler tool that all independent watchmakers have. The oiler tool dispenses what can best be described as nearly a microscopic amount of oil. And, it takes a trained and experienced hand to dole out that oil in the proper spots. Seriously, even one actual drop of oil is horrendously too much.

Seems like the watch has a ton of sentimental value to you. Take it to a qualified independent watchmaker. Please don't try to do the job yourself. Putting oil into a vehicle is one thing. Watches? Completely different thing.
 

Flying Turtle

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Actually while I've worn the watch a long time I'm not greatly attached to it. Based on all this good advice I think I'll just live with it till it passes. I may end up with another Seiko or possibly an Orient. One like this old one would probably cost a bit over $100 now. Don't want to spend much more than that, but I could go to maybe $200. Maybe it's time to peruse the watch sites again.

Geoff
 

Monocrom

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Been awhile since I last stopped by the WatchUSeek forums.
But I'd hazard a guess that it's likely still a good place to check out.
 

iacchus

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I've honestly gotten a bit annoyed enough lately at waving and resetting my mechanicals when I pick which one I want to wear for the day. I don't truck w/ watchwinders, so thats out.
I've been looking at some Solar or Kinetic movements lately. I have neither and this is a good enough justification to pick up one or two as any.
Nothing expensive, just some decent GADA wristwear.
 

Monocrom

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Go with solar!

Kinetic movements = All the disadvantages of quartz, combined with all the disadvantages of mechanical/automatic movements.
 

bykfixer

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I've honestly gotten a bit annoyed enough lately at waving and resetting my mechanicals when I pick which one I want to wear for the day. I don't truck w/ watchwinders, so thats out.
I've been looking at some Solar or Kinetic movements lately. I have neither and this is a good enough justification to pick up one or two as any.
Nothing expensive, just some decent GADA wristwear.
My solar watches are at least 12 years old and still haven't needed a battery swap or winding. Just feed them light a couple of hours a day.

My kinetics lasted about 9 years until the batteries stopped charging. Seiko and Citizen make good solar watches at affordable prices.

IMG_6014.jpeg

Today it's a gen 2 Orient Bambino hooked to a 1970's style suede leather band. Prices have gone up but some can be found at Amazon for under $200.
 

iacchus

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I ended up getting one of these:

20240615-165159.jpg


JDM Casio Oceanus T200S. Solar, sapphire, perpetual calendar, Multi-band 6, syncs to your phone and will update there too.
The cases are made by Seiko on the same lines as the Grand Seiko cases, so it has that nice Zaratsu polishing.

It came w/ a bracelet, but I will have to get that sized, so for now it rides on black leather.

Should be a solid day-to-day performer. I'm pretty happy w/ it so far.
 
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