What's in your Bug-Out-Bag?

Lunal_Tic

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

nekomane,

Thanks again. Interesting about the phones not too surprised about the NTT site. River, not near the delta no worries there. Whistle is on the bug-out-neck lanyard with a couple of other things. 100 yen shops, practically live there. Fun stuff though I've noticed they are trying to move upscale. Lots of non 100 yen stuff lately.

I've got some of the masks CC had a while back. I know they're ok for particulate and odors but is there something small that would be good for smoke? I've seen the tin can kind with the yellow bag over the head. Anything else.

-LT
 

nazgul

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

Try using a backpack instead of the CC bag. Having you hands free and I would want a bigger pack.

Get the special wrench to turn off the gas line.

I forget the brand, but there is a japanese prybar/nail puller that comes in different colours. They are pretty common, they kick butt.

Get a lot of dust masks, maybe even the ones that they wear in public when they are sick.

Prescription meds, spare glasses/contacts/storage. Extra contact solution. Asprin or what ever you use. Immodium AD.

Try to see if you can find japanese version of a Rite in Rain note pad. Wooden pencils can be sharpened with a knife, mechanical ones may have broken leads from rough handling. Get a sharpie(Sakura) permanant marker. You can wrap tape around the pen/pencil for storage.

Contractor grade garbage bag, not the cheap ones that they have in the gomi pile.

First aid kit that you know how to use.

Water containers. Camelbaks are great. I have used platypus collapsible containers under some hard use with great results. They fold up to save space. To me Nalgene bottles are bombproof. They ones with the wide necks can be also used for dry storage of important items or food. Snow Peak is a japanese company that makes a mug that the Nalgene bottle can nest inside.

Assorted zip ties, again get the heavy duty ones in multiple sizes. Couple of hose clamps in different sizes.

Food to last you 72 hours, maybe even longer. I have heard that the government response was slow in the 95 Kobe quake. Can you imagine the chaos in the middle of Shinjuku during the middle of the workday? Maybe a bunch of the prepacked ramen/curry that you add hot water to? It has its own container that can be cleaned and reused.

Leather work gloves and latex gloves.

If you have family, you have to be able to take care of them too. Baby food, diapers, tampons(can use as field bandage too) etc.

Tarp for shelter/strecher. I pre tie a length of paracord(8-12 feet) on all of the grommets and leave it on. That way you can set up a shelter faster if it is raining. Get a small spool of paracord. If you can't find paracord you can score something at a 100yen store or Tokyu Hands. Steel wire.

I agree with nekomane, it is when not if it happens in Tokyo. I have been there a number of times and I don't think that the average person in Shinjuku or Shibuya is going to be able to cope with a sudden change of life. The younger ones are too dependent on technology IMHO.

You also have to consider how much of this stuff you are willing to carry daily. It doesnt do you any good if you dont have it in hand when you need it. I would stash one at work and another at home. I assume you ride the train instead of driving to work so you need to be able to carry it on the train daily.

nekomane/Luna Tic- Do you think that the japanese in Tokyo will adapt well and be civil after a major disaster or all out bedlam? Say no a water/power/gas situation.
 

nekomane

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

Hello nazgul,
I spent about 2 weeks in Kobe in 1995. Bodies were still being pulled from rubble and people who lost their houses or were afraid to sleep indoors, were living in the streets.

Unless they were not greiving the loss of a close relative/friend, after recovering from the initial shock, many people were enthusistically helping each other, the young looking after the old, sharing food, finding anything to do to get back to some kind of normalcy to keep their minds off the devastation. The standard of ethics could have actually been better than normal times (and the current standard in Tokyo is embarassingly low BTW).
You get a glimpse of the best and worst of human behaviour during hardships, and though I did hear rumors of small scale looting and crime, in the end this was never confirmed.

An example of the worst happened during the huge quake that hit Tokyo in 1923. Unfounded rumors were spread that an ethnic minority group were poisoning drinking wells which led to mass hysteria and the massacre of thousands of them.

There is no way to acurately predict how people will react when a modern metropolis is hit by a major catastrophe. The time of day, season, weather, social or political atmosphere.. just too many variables to consider. And the long term effects may be far difficult to cope with than finding food and shelter for a few days while the adrenalin is running.

To be more specific to your question though.. Hmm without water/power/gas...

There is an unforgetable scene I came across in Kobe. A gentleman in his 50s, smartly dressed in his Sunday golfing clothes, probably the only he managed to salvage, was addressing a group of people in a rather authoritative manner..
After explaining several tasks at hand, he started .. 'I have an annoucment to make.. We will have to take turns cleaning the portable toilets as they are, they are.. overflowing'. The man then broke down in tears, the last straw of dignity he had, severed. To be truthfully honest, being rather used to answering nature's call in odd places or outdoors, I thought this kind of amusing. A grown man crying over the task of cleaning his ....

But who knows, I was only visiting then, and I'll probably be the one crying if I was stuck in the middlle of a disaster zone, overcrowded and no privacy, looking after a family and having no idea when I could return to work or eat a warm meal. Tokyo urbanites are spoiled to the bone by modern conveniences. There is so much you take for granted like just pulling a lever to 'clean up'.

Excuse the long post, please /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

VidPro

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

i never have to Bug-Out :)
but here is some stuff i gathered from making car kits, and Never having enough ROOM for anything.
If i really was totally prepared, it would be a bug-out-MotorHome :)

Instead of duct tape, which doesnt really last long over time anyways. get a roll of automotive heater hose tape.
its small light, will replace duct tape, and works when wet.
because water is so valuable, and transportation can be iffy, you could save the day, with a roll of that stuff.
it will also fold up in a small package.

Poncho and Huge Leaf bag, umm they are the SAME THING :)
put 2 large leaf (contractors) bags in your kit, and you have a poncho too :)

from what i have hear about every disaster in the world, WATER, the one thing you cant go without is the most important thing, and hardest to carry :-(
because instant (light and pill) decontamination methods for water dont get out dead and inanitimate things out of the water, a FILTER device protected from exposure, would be very important , i would think.
you can get water anywhere, rolling down the street, but to get the metal, dirt, oil, and other stuff OUT of it, takes a good filter.

and of course i wouldnt be without my roll of TP, and beef jerkey, but that has been covered.

What other COMBOS would work to extend the life of your bag, without extending its size?
a nice cotten shirt, that could also be a medical bandage?
stuff like that there.
 

KevinL

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

[ QUOTE ]
VidPro said:
Poncho and Huge Leaf bag, umm they are the SAME THING :)
put 2 large leaf (contractors) bags in your kit, and you have a poncho too :)

from what i have hear about every disaster in the world, WATER, the one thing you cant go without is the most important thing, and hardest to carry :-(
because instant (light and pill) decontamination methods for water dont get out dead and inanitimate things out of the water, a FILTER device protected from exposure, would be very important , i would think.
you can get water anywhere, rolling down the street, but to get the metal, dirt, oil, and other stuff OUT of it, takes a good filter.


[/ QUOTE ]

Good idea about the leaf bag. In fact, one of those bags can help to waterproof the main compartment of your BOB, ie. if you use a backpack, you can wrap the majority of the stuff in the leaf bag, and put it into the middle of the pack. Tie it up. In a dire emergency, the plastic can be torn apart with fingers, no nails even.

Leaf bags make good groundsheets to sleep on and yes I have actually had to use it before as a poncho/raincoat.. it's not breathable though /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Well said about the filters. My UV Aquastar (http://www.uvaquastar.com) came with some coffee filters for basic debris filtration but if you expect to be weathering a civil disaster, a more robust filter is required for pre-treatment. Important: The water must be reasonably clear for the UV light to work. Turbid (cloudy) water reduces its effectiveness considerably. If your water source is really bad, prefiltering is a must.
 

Lunal_Tic

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

I've got a backpacking H2O filter that can take out particulate but perhaps a bunch of coffee filters would help make the filter last longer.

I've thought about the larger backpack route but it becomes an exercise in Parkinson's Theory; one corollary of which goes "stuff expands to fill the space allotted".

I picked up one of those flexible solar panels but it's too big for the CC bag so it goes in the second tier bag. I figure it could be used to run a lot of stuff plus help with trade; keep people's battery powered stuff going I get other things I need.

-LT
 

nazgul

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

[ QUOTE ]
Lunal_Tic said:

I've thought about the larger backpack route but it becomes an exercise in Parkinson's Theory; one corollary of which goes "stuff expands to fill the space allotted".

-LT

[/ QUOTE ]

LT,

I would rather have than need in an emergency situation.
 

Lunal_Tic

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

nazgul,

I agree however it becomes a question of balance and speed. If it becomes overlarge and isn't carried then it has defeated the purpose. It's also why I actually EDC a mini kit in case I'm in transit when the "event" happens. It will have enough to get me to the bigger kit. In fact I've thought about a stash off-site but finding a secure place it a bit difficult around here.

-LT
 

shimmeringtrance

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

some great ideas here everyone, i'm in the process of making a B.O.B myself. one thing i'm definitely including in mine is a taser, with extra cartridges. never know when that could be a needed item.
 

Lunal_Tic

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

nazgul,

Thanks for the link. Looks cool but I think my EDC pack carries more and is designed a bit better. From the pix it looks like a compression strap goes over the side water bottle. That makes it hard to get out easily. My EDCs are Mt. Smith lumbar packs, a couple of which have integrated H2O which I like a lot.

I like the idea of Max's add on pouches but I haven't seen them in person so it's hard to tell how it's implemented. I've got Max bag that I like for it's build quality but not it's design (about 80 out of 100 points), of course I didn't know that before I bought it online. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

I'm still on the hunt for the perfect bag but for now the CC one will do.

-LT
 

junior

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

Looks real nice but it looks like a regular torso pac with maybe just a couple of add ons and the price is 83.00 odd bucks!!!!!!!

Looks nice though

I have always liked mountain smith especially for it was started and used to be owned by the guy that started and currently owns Kifaru.

Mountain smith offers back pack type strap add ons for their torspacs which believe it or not are very important when you carry heavier than normal weight in your torso or lumbar pac or plan long trips.

If you plan on using a torso/lumbar pac for a bob bag, i would highly reccomend you purchase shoulder back pack style straps for your pac. I have used a military LBV shoulder straps for a ultimate direction torso pac i had.
 

nazgul

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

I have one of the first gen Mountainsmith lumbar packs that I use for a small BOB. It holds almost a cold pack. I had pack from the late 80s that was really well made although I could never get it to fit right. My friend has the old school Frostfire version that still gets used. It is beat to crap but still works well. I think that Mountainsmith has changed hands awhile ago so I don't know how quality is now.

I have an old Dana Designs Terraplane and Humbug Spire packs. They are the best built and comfortable packs that I have found. They too have changed owners so I don't know how the build quality is now.

Kifaru is another great brand of packs although it is geared toward the military. Try Mystery Ranch too.

Good luck looking for the perfect bag. Keep us posted, I'd like to see what you come up with.
 

Lunal_Tic

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

Here are my small, mini, and micro packs:
img0798small6bm.jpg

From Left to Right:
SpecOps PackRat
(band-aids, safety pins, wire saw, foam ear plugs, eye drops, paper clips, County Comm dust mask, meds, Streamlight 1L, Glowring green,Brunton telescope/microscope, shoulder strap, padded handle, Leatherman Squirt, lighter, whistle, rubber ear plugs, small red bike flasher, 2xCR123, razor knife, 4 color pen, pencil, 512MB I-stick memkey, Belkin Quadra pen(pen,stylus,laser,white LED), 60GB Firelite harddrive, notepad, tissues, frenzel lens, 6x6" wire ties/tie wraps, 3x extra coin cell lights)

SpecOps Mini Cargo Pocket Organizer
(lighter, bright yellow bandana, meds, razor knife, Bic pen, 256MB IBM memkey, Arc AAA, Fox 40 mini whistle, Photon 3 red, Glowring green)

Neoprene sunglass case (modded)
(Fire~Fly II w/2 stage switch, 2xCR123, Leatherman Squirt, meds)

At least one of these is with me at all times when I'm out. I use them in various day/waist packs; several also have hydration. Their size makes it easy to move from one pack to another and still have what I need. Note these are not the BOBs that I'm putting together.

-LT

<edited for bag contents>
 

Lunal_Tic

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

John_KK,

One thing for sure I've gotten from the guys above is whatever coins will make a payphone work in an emergency. In Japan I didn't know that only 10 yen coins would work so I've set out to hoard a few of them and will add them to my BOBs. Water is also a top priority so I pack a filter as well.

I also include lights, batteries, data backup, knife, whistle, meds, tissue and a multi tool in all bags. After that it depends on where I keep it.

-LT
 

frankborelli

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KDOG3

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

Great info!!! I bookmarked those pages!! My CountyComm B.O.B. should be here today, and I will look at your suggestions when loading it up!
 

frankborelli

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

Roger that. All emails are answered, so please send along any questions, complaints, etc!
 

chiphead

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Re: What\'s in your Bug-Out-Bag?

To all, please include in kit a good all-hazard weather radio (Radio Shack,Midland, etc). File this one under lessons learned.

chiphead
 
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