When do you dispose of your older cells.

Wurkkos

chip100t

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Joined
Apr 1, 2021
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71
I recently bought a charger with a capacity test function to monitor how my older (4 years old) cells are fairing. Surprisingly they are still working at 90%-95% of their original capacity. I read that batteries should be replaced once they get down to 80% of their capacity, but for essential electrical equipment you should replace at 90% capacity.

When do you replace your batteries?
Do you do so after a certain time, say 5 or 6 years or do you wait until your flashlights start to start crapping out on you due to the battery running out too soon
 

vicv

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Mar 22, 2013
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1,329
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Southern Ontario
Basically I take a look at the screen when I throw them on a charger. If I see the voltage jump up very quickly, that means the internal resistance is gone up and the battery is finished. Also I mostly use incandescent flashlights. You can tell when the cells are not giving good voltage under load anymore
 

paulsiu

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Sep 8, 2019
Messages
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I usually use them until they don't work in the device that I took them from.

For items that are more mission critical like Sump pumps, I often test them using a battery load tester.
 

Lark Hunter

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Jul 23, 2021
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When they're no longer capable of doing the necessary task, I tend to move cells to lower demand applications, then use them until said weaker cells are no longer suitable for that task.
 

Nocturrne

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Jul 2, 2019
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Location
Texas
I keep old batteries until they literally will not hold a charge anymore. When they begin to have obviously lower capacity, I just cycle them over to my junk battery box and use them to power other projects, like outdoor weather and garden sensors.
 

ikanode

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Nov 1, 2019
Messages
17
TV remotes and wireless mice/keyboards are good uses for low capacity cells. Since they are easy to access.
 

Got Lumens?

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Mar 12, 2011
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2,157
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Champlain Valley
I'll be honest.
Most of my older cells are still fine, albeit I can no longer use them with the increasing demands of current lights. I use them in my older lights mostly. I in fact keep buying newer cells that are needed with current light's and their demands. I have had to retire some very old cells due to their capacity/ampacity issues using the lights I still have that work.
 
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