When is enough, enough?

orbital

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 8, 2007
Messages
3,314
Location
WI
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Slotting this in here::

Several months ago I gave my UPS driver a Nitecore penlight.
Over the last couple years he's delivered all kinds of big/heavy/awkward solar stuff to my house. It was the least I could do and float him a light..
Asked him if he had anything like that & he said "no I don't.. 'thanks!"

Fast forward to this afternoon,
ran into him today & asked how that lights' working out for him,, he perked up immediately & said "I use it all the time, in fact just a couple nights ago I put it in hat to work on something in my basement"

I said 'well alright' & thanked him again

When is enough, enough?
likely never, since I enjoy giving lights away.
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
17,207
Location
My own little Idaho
I used to buy lights on sale to give to the trash man, the mail carrier, UPS dude etc. One year I bought 25 Coast HP-1 lights from an Amazon sale and gave away nearly every one. Those were a little 1aa zoomie that were $7 each. I started out buying 10, then 10 more then 5 to keep but only kept 2. I doubt any are still in use due to a tail cap switch issue or worse...alkaleak. But back then everybody who got one liked it.

Now, pretty much everybody who wants an LED light has one or three. Or a celphone :eek:
But around 2015 that was not the case.
 

Jean-Luc Descarte

Enlightened
Joined
Jul 29, 2020
Messages
527
Location
Where the sun sets fast
Since the thread has been revived...

I honestly don't know when enough is enough, and if "enough" is ever set in stone. Getting into 21700 lights and the new LEDs (FC40 and 519A are lots of fun) now has me going again, although I definitely slowed down since I started. I don't stretch my budget to buy lights anymore, and typically only set sights on one at a time.

One might say it's *gasp* responsible flashaholism!... but come on, we all know that doesn't exist :grin2:
 

Hooked on Fenix

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
2,921
Enough is enough when you run out of money. You have to choose to be content with what you have until you have more money, or sell some lights to buy new ones.
 

3_gun

Enlightened
Joined
Jun 27, 2021
Messages
455
Enough is a very open point. I had at one point, "enough". It was a Fenix LD10r5 a twist head high/low, rear button, single AA battery, EDC light. It met my needs for well over 10 years of use. Till it didn't & it wasn't "enough" anymore. Still a good light but it's not enough today.

Now more than 20 different lights in & I've gotten real close to enough but the "enough" today is a whole lot bigger than in the past.

I have a single battery "thrower" that's smaller & brighter than the one mounted to my car years ago. A work EDC that runs for [email protected] easily off a 21700 that didn't exist when I last shopped for a light. An 14500 EDC causal light that's slightly larger that a AA & can hit 1000L on turbo. Lights in CU & Ti that are as much jewelry as a watch would be. "Enough"? Didn't get to the 18650 IP68 light with a cold weather battery good to well below freezing or the bike light that's light weight, weather sealed & vibration proof. Still haven't gotten to the high CRI, flood lights for camera use. Enough? Hard to say since I haven't gotten to a weapon, work or head light.
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
17,110
Location
NYC
For gift-giving, "enough" was a few years back. Family members and close friends taken care of years ago. Many were thankful, almost none used them. Done with co-workers many years ago as well, even though I've switched jobs a couple of times since then. One was very grateful. Ironically it was a very cheaply made Garrity 1AAA LED keychain light. Used to be my EDC at the time. Caught her admiring it a couple of times. The rest.... Decided the near-future frustrations and headaches weren't worth it.

One example: Very first 2AA MiniMag LED model. Looking back, a historic model now. Long ago, had one; never used it. Gifted it to a security co-worker whom I shared a shift with at Marymount Manhattan college. Specifically the old dormitory. We worked at night, and he didn't have a light. For some bizarre reason, never occurred to him to get one he could EDC on the job. He seemed thankful. Few weeks later I notice he's not using it. Asked him about it. So one night while changing into his uniform in the backroom, which takes him half an hour (not even exaggerating), he "lost" the light. Not really. He switches out of his civilian clothes, and into his uniform. But whereas most folks would have a belt on both their pants, he'd take off and put on the same belt; on a nightly basis. So, with the Mag pouch attached to his belt, one night he forgot. It went flying underneath a table in the small backroom. Rather than get down on one knee to retrieve it, he just left it there! Planned on getting it later. Forgot. When he remembered, it was gone.

No, he's not elderly. Just a former raging alcoholic who finally managed to get that monkey off his back after many long years. Sadly, it was clear though that only most of him had made it back; not all. Didn't bother me at first. But the more I thought about it, the more it did. Last time I gifted a co-worker a light.

Truth is, most of the security staff at MMC were far from respectable. I thought he was different. A blend of in-house and contracted guards. The in-house ones were just horrible people who were extremely lucky to have great-paying jobs they clearly didn't deserve. Especially the one who looked like Santa Claus. Arrogant as hell. Got his job because his father worked at MMC and got him in there. If not for that, he'd likely be homeless living in a box. Security team headed up by former NYPD detectives. Also, arrogant and retired early from the NYPD in order to make more money. Shows you how intelligent the school's Admins. are. Detective work and Security have almost nothing in common. It's like hiring FDNY fire-fighters to head up your dog grooming business. But in fairness, they didn't just sit around doing nothing....

One student who was clearly an alcoholic was made to sign a contract that she would leave, without getting the rest of her tuition money refunded, if she ever returned to the dorms drunk again. Well, obviously no alcoholic can keep such a promise. Doubt such a document would even be admissible in court. They waited. Three weeks later, she screwed up and got kicked out. A male student became homeless shortly after graduation. He kept stopping by the dorms, begging for a bit of food or a spot to flop on. One of the other guards called the school. The Dean and the former NYPD detectives put in a massive effort to contact the former student. They found him. No, they didn't try to help him! They threatened him with jail-time if he ever returned to the dorms! Honestly, that's why I genuinely thought the security guard I worked with at MMC was different. He wasn't a scumbag.
 
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