Where to mount a light?

Wurkkos

Packhorse

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revo.jpg



Latest dive purchase.

It has a bracket on each side to hold a cannister or perhaps an argon bottle. I could put it there but it may be a bit hard to turn on.
 

sonodelirii

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damn, that's sexy... makes me wish I wasn't broke...

Strap the battery can to one of the tanks. If your switch is on the can move it to the butt end of the light? (you make awesome lights all day long, I am sure it wont be a huge problem)
 

Packhorse

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Sorry, I wasnt really asking where to mount my light. I was just trying to make it a fitting post for the forum. ( or showing off). I will probably keep my light on my waist strap.
damn, that's sexy... makes me wish I wasn't broke...
It is sexy aye! And Im more than broke... but happy!
Where do you mount your light when you aren't using a rebreather? Don't you still have a waist belt?
I usually leave it in a bin with some of my other dive gear!:whistle:
 

DIWdiver

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Showoff!

I guess you've earned it though, many times over. Congrats.

I thought there was a 'green with envy' emoticon, but I couldn't find it.

D
 

Packhorse

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ufff ... tehnical stuff. :)

A lot of things to check before diving ...

To be honest ... I'm litle scary of these rebreathers ... before two months we have 2 death accidents of slovenian divers at Miramare in Italy with new rebreathers (Voyager )

http://www.rebreatherworld.com/all-...ving-accident-italy-takes-casualty-among.html

Check lists on a manual CCR is less and quicker than a eCCR.
Yes there is more involved in diving them than open circuit diving but the advantages are many and the extra maintenance and checks are all part of the fun.

As for the deaths that article does not state the cause of death so blaming it on the rebreather is a bit unfair. Also consider that it seems the users were untrained. ( and these look to be SCR rebreathers).

To the best of my knowledge no one has dies as a result of a faulty rEvo.
 

DIWdiver

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To the best of my knowledge no one has dies as a result of a faulty rEvo.

We recently had a very experienced diver die due to suspected operator malfunction. This is much more difficult to do with SCUBA.

I envy those who can dive safely with rebreathers. Unfortunately, I'm not one of them, and fortunately I know it.

D
 

SmokedCPU

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Congrats, verry nice unit Pack

Rb scare me too, since as result of user error, or faulty valve/electronics the air diver breath may become deathly at any depth. Just respect the unit and guidelines, as with great liberty come big responsibilities....

with scuba, just respect MOD, deco and the third rule.

If ya dont want to expose to risk, dont dive, sit in front of tv and die fat :sick2:

If the diver have an healt issue, diving will be blamed anyway, and if he's using a such thing, rb will be pointed and news will only focus on this.

Have a good time with that !!! bring us some nice pictures of australian waters. Ours are one month to be frozen.
 

Packhorse

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........ bring us some nice pictures of australian waters. Ours are one month to be frozen.
While I will be travelling to Australia to do the course I doubt I will take my camera. I But I will post some of my pics I shoot in New Zealand.:naughty:
 

uk_caver

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Funny thig was when my wife saw it she said "Is that it? You could have made that!"
I've seen a few home-made rebreathers that cave divers have made, though I guess in those cases, the people concerned do know exactly what they're doing, and also have reasons for home-building other than cost, like compactness/dissasemblability, complete knowledge of the whole unit, better possibilities for repair in emergency, etc, which probably don't apply to open-water divers.
 

gav6280

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Modern re breathers are very safe, its just the idiots that operate them. It like a computer they dont go wrong all by themselves.

The deaths usually occur when someone hasn't been trained properly, ignored the warnings or just doesn't care.

I cant wait for the day when im old enough to be able to afford a breather, and at the moment its a hybrid Revo III.

Oh and put the light on your wrist......

Oh and i hope this isnt and ADVERT!! LOL... :whistle:
 

Packhorse

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I've seen a few home-made rebreathers that cave divers have made,....

I also have an IDA71 that s only original IDA parts are the case, scrubber and OPV. I ended up replacing or fabricating every thing else. http://www.rebreatherworld.com/home-build-rebreathers/17335-ida-71-in-nz.html
Modern re breathers are very safe, its just the idiots that operate them.
I agree. This is one reason I decided against the hCCR. I feel that using/ learning on a mCCR will make for a better diver since you are forced to take control of the unit as opposed to being able to let the computer run it.
 
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