Wireless charging for flashlight batteries, is it possible?

XTAR Light

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Manufacturer
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Apr 26, 2010
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543
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China
Nowadays, wireless battery charging is commonly found on smart phones, portable media players, tablets and wearables, which provides easy-to-use charging solutions. So would it also be possible to charge flashlight batteries with the wireless charging in the future? We may have thought about a built-in wireless charging system on the flashlights, no exposed ports, completely sealed and waterproof. With this design, it can greatly enhance reliability, reduce the mechanical damage caused by repeatedly plugging in the lights’ charging ports.

And some people also tell they’d like to see remote induction charging on flashlights, able to make lights automatically charge as moving on the inductive zone. This Induction charging seems a sound technology and more possibilities with it’s currently advancing. Besides, there are also a couple companies, such as, wi-charge charges via infrared light, energizing the operations with wireless power...

Any ideas, comment freely.
 

WJA

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Jan 28, 2017
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XDmToter

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Dec 30, 2017
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Wireless charging requires a relatively large, flat surface. This is why it works for phones and tablets. The larger the flat surface, the more amperage can be transferred wirelessly. A small EDC light would not have much room for a decent sized wireless charger, so the charge rate would be Very slow. It's a good idea, but I don't think we're there yet.

I did have a light once that did not have batteries. It used an induction system, which consisted of a moving magnet and a fixed coil. When you shook the light it charged a capacitor to give you a few seconds of run time. Not many uses where that was practical. It was very noisy and only gave you a short run time.
 

yazkaz

Flashlight Enthusiast
CPF Supporter
Joined
Feb 2, 2006
Messages
1,064
Nowadays, wireless battery charging is commonly found on smart phones, portable media players, tablets and wearables, which provides easy-to-use charging solutions. So would it also be possible to charge flashlight batteries with the wireless charging in the future? We may have thought about a built-in wireless charging system on the flashlights, no exposed ports, completely sealed and waterproof. With this design, it can greatly enhance reliability, reduce the mechanical damage caused by repeatedly plugging in the lights’ charging ports.

And some people also tell they’d like to see remote induction charging on flashlights, able to make lights automatically charge as moving on the inductive zone. This Induction charging seems a sound technology and more possibilities with it’s currently advancing. Besides, there are also a couple companies, such as, wi-charge charges via infrared light, energizing the operations with wireless power...

Any ideas, comment freely.
No offence but this kind of idea is way off when it comes to charger tech. In fact some of my concerns and criticism regarding this brand's products are as follows:

1. Way too many models and iteraations: the model lineups need to be cleaned up (and consolidated) a bit;
2. Inclusion of NiMH charging compatibility but that such charging strategies are not as good (or trusted) as some other competitors (eg. Maha). I'd suggest dropping such compatibility and instead concentrating on (and improving) the LiIon charging strategies on its subsequent charger products;
3. Not able to include different LiIon charging capabilities (ie. 3.6V/4.2V/4.35V top off compatibility) on all subsequent charger products after the VP2;
4. Some QC issues on certain products.
Example: some VP2 units' USB outputs are not stable and, when measured by a USB meter, are found to disconnect and reconnect intermittently under load (ie. when charging an external device). On another VP2, the unit's rear voltage top-off selection slider seems to be a bit too loose (while not affecting operation).

IMO Xtar should take care of the aforementioned issues first, before considering moving on to other newer charging solutions (eg. wireless/induction charging).
 
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