Would you change CR123A in the rain?

stockae92

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the rain in socal got me thinking ...

would you/should i change the CR123A in the flashlight in, say, moderate to heavy rain? is it safe?

i.e. even though SF (or the like) is moderately water resistance, but changing batteries in the rain will likely to get the batteries wet before putting them in ...
 

chiphead

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No! That's why I keep a large (11 X 13) plastic baggy around for use a changing bag. Lithiums do not like to get wet.

chiphead
 

JanCPF

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Yes, sure. I would do that in a heart beat. It will take me about 10-15 seconds to do a battery change, and if a drop of water should enter the light, then so be it. A drop or two won't harm the flashlight. Rainwater is essentially distilled water that doesn't conduct electricity very well.

EDIT: I would of course dry it out as soon as possible.

I've flooded a dive light a couple of times with saltwater and that's a much worse situation. But if it happens the flashlight is not necessarily ruined. The trick is to leave the light on (until you get on dry land) even though it is flooded, thereby allowing the current to flow through the bulb rather than though the saltwater thus preventing the electrolytic effect from corroding the terminals.

Jan
 

ViReN

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DON'T .... They will ruin your flashlight corrode things beyond repairs (including the Steel casing that the battery has).... Posibbly EXPLODE too....
 

KevinL

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I would avoid changing them, unless I absolutely had to, and even then I'd try to shelter them somehow. The bag is a good idea. I'm not comfortable with breaching the seals of a light in the rain, and I guess that is what the New York Reload is for - you *DO* carry more than one light, don'tcha /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

Doug Owen

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When the alternative is to stay in the dark?

You bet. Despite what many think, 123 cells are safe in water, *read the specs*, you don't have to guess. As I recall, one of the makers did a test by punching nail holes in them before throwing them in a bucket of water.....

For sure there's no fog or rain warning on the box.

As another poster points out, drying them out inside as soon as you can is no doubt a good plan. But I don't think anyone can point to any data from a maker (or MSDS) that says water is a problem.....it sounds like CPF Urban Legend to me.

"I would change it in the rain,
I would change it on a train."

Doug Owen
 

Thertel

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I've changed out cr123's in my inova T3 more times in hte rain then I have in nice weather. I always seem to need my life on a rainy night as opposed to a bright rainfree day. To this point I have had no problems.

Thomas
 

greenlight

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Some lights are easy to take apart and dry out. The Inova is tough to take apart, so getting watter inside the components wouldn't be desireable.
 

HarryN

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There are ways to design a light so that even if the battery compartment is flooded, the light would still work. This requires the electronics section to be sealed from the battery compartment, which is I think rare.

I have a home made like this, and for fun, change the batteries under water (sink deep). It works if the light can handle it.
 

Big_Ed

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Please excuse my ignorance, but what can happen if lithium batteries get wet? And how wet? Just a few drops, or are we talking totally submerged? Thanks.
 

ViReN

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in my case (even at high humidity)... they absorb the water... corode the things and eat the Steel AND alluminium FAST !... this is true for a wornout (but still has some juice left) battery. it had happened with my peak McKinley...

its better if things are kept dry
 

ViReN

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i am sorry to say.. but it was apperantly 12 - 24 hours... for me.. i guess

it so happened that i had i had kept a dim battery for over 2 months in my Peak McKinley... never opened while it was dim... so i am not sure when it started actually started...

earlier i used to check every now and then to check if the battery leaks etc ...similar to what i normally do with alkaline & carbon zinc flashlights...

the last when i did this was i remember i had my hands wet ... at the time of closing the battery tube (it is also possible that the battery got wet)... after that i never opened the compartment for 2 months...

one fine night .. i decided to "kill" the battery by keeping it ON throu out the night (making it a lil nite lite)... but... next morning.. i find.. the battery compartment exploded ! there was a small hole protruding out blowing things off .. mostly an orangish pale liquid ...

thankfully, i had kept the light in inverted 10 CD cover (translucent plastic bowl basically) otherwise things would have got very messy... i kept it in plastic because... the whole cover was like "Glowing" creating a very nice effect....

for disposal of the things... i put on surgical gloves... and opened the light... only to find.. the battery compartment filled with RUST & alluminium was also corroded .. i had to dispose the things fast.. i was so scared... i didnt even think of taking pictures at that time... was more worried in safe disposal.

... surprisingly the inside of head of McKinley was intact (with just scar marks, matt finish now instead of shiny /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif) .... (head made up of different material ??? dont know) .. but right now.. i am looking for a body(battery tube) of Peak McKinley ... the head is still working !

also note that there was no corrosion in the threaded region (probably because of lubricating greese)

now i am looking to buy a new McKinley Battery tube...

also... after a couple of days later ... i did another experiment... opening up a worn out elchepo lithium battery... i found out that alluminium with exposure to the battery contents (wet... black thingy) emitted some sort of SMOKE .. i had to use caution.. and used fire extuingisher..... i would rather link details of what happened ... just scroll down and see the my post about the experiment.
 

ViReN

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Also, For those who dont think Lithium Battries to be dangerous... .. .they would never have banned them to carry in person in flights ! get the hint... Safty comes FIRST !
 

KevinL

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[ QUOTE ]
Doug Owen said:
When the alternative is to stay in the dark?

You bet. Despite what many think, 123 cells are safe in water, *read the specs*, you don't have to guess. As I recall, one of the makers did a test by punching nail holes in them before throwing them in a bucket of water.....


[/ QUOTE ]

Duracell did the abuse tests, the .PDF document is available on the technical info side of their web page. The cell was most certainly dunked and nothing happened to it.

Just to clarify, I wouldn't change them unless I had to (ie. the light's out and my backup's out) not because I'm afraid of them exploding but rather because I'd PREFER not to get the light's innards wet..

But as they say push come to shove, let's do it. Then again with my U2 and its insane runtime on lower levels, that's a LOT of shoving required /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
 
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