Your usages of rechargeable 1.2V Ni-MH or 1.5V Li-ion AA/AAA batteries?

Lynx_Arc

Lynx_Arc

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Other pair of Xtar AA Li-ion's went through son's X-Box controller. I'm saying it lasted quite a long time but do not have any hard numbers to compare with alkaline. The boy found some alkies for replacement. He does not like the sudden drop when the Li-ions are depleted. One can only hope his $60 controller does not get poisoned with battery bile.
He should use L91s if eneloops don't cut it they make cost an extra dollar or two but could save him $50 in the long tun.
 
KITROBASKIN

KITROBASKIN

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Perhaps we should try some lithium primaries, but the boy can pay for them.

He just started Forza Horizon 5; lots of vibratory action in the controller. Hoping that frequent use and starting fresh will lessen the chance of battery juice destruction.
 
Lynx_Arc

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Perhaps we should try some lithium primaries, but the boy can pay for them.

He just started Forza Horizon 5; lots of vibratory action in the controller. Hoping that frequent use and starting fresh will lessen the chance of battery juice destruction.
At the least buy a brand of alkaleak that has a stated warranty on them and be very willing to deal with the battery company when they do spew and cause damage. If the damage was able to be totally cleaned up easily which is about half the time and the other half you have to deal with the loss of contact plating which can have them oxidizing and needing cleaning often to restore use of the device. I have several remotes that were damaged by alkaleaks as I cannot always afford to put nimh or lithium primaries in every device . I probably need to invest in some deoxit or something like that to protect the contacts that has lost their plating due to alkaspew.
 
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tripplec

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Lithium AA work were even new Alkaline will not for very long. A week or so with Alkaline and the device specifying to use Lithium says they're weak already. Where the Lithium will go for more than a year. They're not equivalent and certainly much better in low current applications.
 
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SaraAB87

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Here's some of my applications for Li-ion AA's

Oculus quest controllers and other VR controllers. I don't personally have these, but this drop the voltage and will stop vibrating and stop working if the voltage dips to 1.2, you can find various accounts of this on the internet. Nimh doesn't work in these, and alkaline doesn't last very long at all and becomes expensive, quickly.

Xbox 360 controller, it will give you the dancing lights on the controller way too early, with li-ion I assume it would hold up with full power until it turned off, which could eliminate the annoying dancing lights. Must be ready to change batteries fast though if you are in the middle of an important game. You can't plug this one into a USB charger or the console to get instant power like you can with the Xbox one controller.

For the xbox one controller, not sure this is the best solution, but if you need power quickly, you can plug in a cord from the console to the controller, or a USB cord connected to any other power source, like a wall charger or a power bank, it uses a USB-C cable. You can also plug in the controller while the batteries are still in the controller and its perfectly safe. Nimh seems to work just fine for this kind of controller.

For the Wii controller I think these would work great. Especially when using the Wii controller with Motion plus which drains faster. I also heard that this controller becomes less responsive as the voltage drops especially when playing games with heavy motion controls, so if your Wii controller hits 2 bars left of battery, you need to change the batteries when it hits this. With these batteries it could hold up for a lot longer on 4 bars most likely giving you full power while you game. I've found nimh batteries work fine in Wii controllers though, so this would be a luxury item and with rechargables, if you need to change batteries when it hits 2 bars, that's no big deal. Also note the Wii controller saps battery when it sits, so its especially prone to leaks if you are using alkaline, you have to be careful with this one. Once the insides are destroyed by battery acid, these controllers will no longer function properly.

I have a red Canon SX150 IS Digital camera that I am still using. Takes 2xAA batteries. This camera will not power on with most Nimh batteries. The only ones I could get to power it were Duracell, some of the newer ones probably similar to ion core, I can't remember what kind, but they eventually stopped working in the camera. No dice with any of the eneloops or duraloops I have even if they are freshly charged. The camera will just display "change the batteries" for most other kinds of nimh. It powers on just fine with Li-ion rechargables. This is an extremely sensitive device.
 
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Geppo

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I don't see any info related to self discharge on that page at all.

Edit: I see xxo beat me to it. I would think that there would be some power drain constantly checking to see if there is a load on the battery to kick in the circuitry that if too high could drain the battery down requiring it to be recharged often to use and in some very low drain devices it may not detect the load and may not supply any power at all.
It depends on how much they drain without load. If they would drain 10uA, it would be negligible. Did anyone conduct any real test on them?
 
Lynx_Arc

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It depends on how much they drain without load. If they would drain 10uA, it would be negligible. Did anyone conduct any real test on them?
None that I know of it would likely require a teardown to ascertain the drain and it may be that 10uA is too low of a current to detect some loads to turn on that is something I don't really know a lot about. The brand names of all the batteries I've seen haven't inspired confidence in them for me to consider them along with the initial investment and as most of my needs of such batteries are for very low drain devices that either yield well over a year or decades even using lithium primaries. I also wonder if they leak RF even in standby mode.
 
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Geppo

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None that I know of it would likely require a teardown to ascertain the drain and it may be that 10uA is too low of a current to detect some loads to turn on that is something I don't really know a lot about. The brand names of all the batteries I've seen haven't inspired confidence in them for me to consider them along with the initial investment and as most of my needs of such batteries are for very low drain devices that either yield well over a year or decades even using lithium primaries. I also wonder if they leak RF even in standby mode.
I don't think a such current is too low to do what is needed. Ultra low power controllers are standard components, moreover a custom designed controller could bring to further improvements, and I think they just use a custom controller.
To test the leakage, I think it would be simpler to test its capacity after some month of resting.
About the EMI, obviously, a switching regulator inherently produces some electromagnetic interference, the interesting parameter is "how much".
If I correctly understood, then at the moment all these are only suspects without any measured values. That is not much.
I think the worst is the abrupt drop of the output voltage at the end of the battery life without any warning.
 
Lynx_Arc

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I don't think a such current is too low to do what is needed. Ultra low power controllers are standard components, moreover a custom designed controller could bring to further improvements, and I think they just use a custom controller.
To test the leakage, I think it would be simpler to test its capacity after some month of resting.
About the EMI, obviously, a switching regulator inherently produces some electromagnetic interference, the interesting parameter is "how much".
If I correctly understood, then at the moment all these are only suspects without any measured values. That is not much.
I think the worst is the abrupt drop of the output voltage at the end of the battery life without any warning.
I think that nimh batteries often do the same on some devices that are engineered poorly using alkaleaks as their battery in mind and saving maybe 25 cents to a dollar on components so they don't like rechargeables. As for them suddenly shutting off usually via the protection circuit in the battery itself it is both good and bad as when alkaleaks cannot hold a high enough voltage under load in the device it also shuts off in many devices I've had some devices with alkaleaks in them that instead of quitting they start acting up stop working till the batteries recover enough which often is a lot more irritating than plainly shutting off.
 

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