Your view of lights with non-replaceable, built-in batteries

3_gun

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Jun 27, 2021
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Give me $5 and I'll take one, other wise hard pass. Of course just because they say it isn't replaceable doesn't mean it can't be replaced if you know what to do & how
 

Jean-Luc Descarte

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I'm generally not interested in disposable products that are not disposable for VERY good reasons. So unless I get it for free like the Titanium Innovations keychain squeeze light I got as a bonus from Battery Junction many moons ago (and now have the screwdriver bits to take it apart and replace the coin cell), hard pass.
 

radellaf

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Apr 10, 2002
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Raleigh, NC
I've picked up one RovyVon, one Nitecore Tini and a TUP (good price). I'm not a fan of non-replaceable batteries (I do love all 3 lights). They're OK, vs 2xCR2032 button cells, for something like a Tube. I have a few of those around. Handy if you want flat vs single AAA.

Far as I know all those are built in, non-replaceable, probably proprietary. Ish. Probably generic size LiPo but not fun or safe to replace. Saw one light (rovy?) that said it was a replaceable proprietary, but they only had lights for sale, no batteries. Maybe that comes later? Shouldn't need a new battery the first year. That'd be better than the usual case where a product and the battery is available for 3 years, and then the pack is discontinued right about when people start needing new ones (ham radio gear).
 

richbuff

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I have a few lights with built in batteries, because that's what came with the beam performance and the beam profile that I wanted.

MS18, R90TS, 2) X65, TM9K. Also, X50, soon. My guess is that Imalent, Acebeam and Nitecore know better than I know. Or maybe those manufacturers marketed those lights to people who do not like external charging. Or maybe a soldered cell connection is less electrical resistance. Or maybe there is less chance of the user inserting the cell incorrectly, or inserting unmatched cells, or inserting an inappropriate cell. I Like external charging. I like the idea of simply inserting new cells. I like to test cells with a multimeter.

But, with the lights that I mentioned, I get to take a break from futzing with the cells, and I get to not have to blame myself for being lazy.
 

Olumin

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Someone on BLF just recommended this Streamlight as a SAR light:


3500 lumen thrower, runs on two protected 18650, seems like a decent alternative to the Fenix wt50r. It can also run on four CR123A.
The reason I liked the fenix is because its so well balanced and has the top mounted handle for carry, all while being very compact on top of that. I havent seen the regulation on the fenix but I imagine its not good on high. If they ever decide to v2.0 it id like to see a slightly larger light with a 4x 21700 config. with a deep smooth reflector or TIR and perhaps even fan cooling. Fan would go in the back with internal air channels leading to the head and out the front again. elegant and compact. It still wouldn't be much larger but imagine constant 3500 lumen for 30 min or longer optimized for throw. runtime would be good too. The other searchlights with cooling Ive seen are always so bulky and ugly. they can keep the internal charging and battery indicator if they want but loose the rubber flap and the secondary led. Fenix is good at regulation they can do this.
 
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novice

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Apr 19, 2006
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I would never buy a light with a non-replaceable cell.
In fact, I don't understand why Sonicare doesn't make a toothbrush that allowed one to unscrew an endcap and make a 16650 or 18650 swap, unless it were over liability concerns. Planned obsolescence does make for increased profits...
 

DaveTheDude

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Oct 26, 2009
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Columbus, Ohio
Let me play devil's advocate here. There is a place for rechargeable but otherwise non-replaceable batteries, specifically, in running headlamps. Some of the ultralight (no pun intended) headlamps from Nitecore fall into this category. The NU20 series of headlamps is featherweight, and does not bounce or jiggle at all, and stays solidly centered during even aggressive trail runs. You can use these headlamps at full throttle for an entire night run, then simply pop a charging cable into 'em when you return home or to your hotel room. And while I personally prefer in most cases to be able to replace a light's battery, there is a legitimate place for certain closed-cell lights.
 

eff

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Sep 12, 2013
Messages
296
I gues the main audience for these lights is not the hardcore led lights fans.
They're more targeted at the casual users, or even people looking for simplicity.
Lots of lumens, no hassle with batteries or chargers.
Use it like a normal light, and charge it like a smartphone.
If you seldom use it, it could last you a few years.

As for the lithium battery capacity loss, it mainly depends how you treat them.
You can use them to their full potential and reduce their lifespan to 1.5-2 years. Or you can treat them gently to maintain their capacity (storage at 50%, charge at 80% for possible use in the future, charge at 100% for immediate use, and when in use never go down below 50% unless it is needed). I've been using the same batteries for more than 6 years, with the 2nd method. However the main constraint to that, is you need to check their voltage, which can be cumbersome.
 
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paulr

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Mar 29, 2003
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10,837
They're more targeted at the casual users, or even people looking for simplicity.
Thing is, they are mostly horribly complicated even for flashaholics. Multiple modes, multiple leds, lockout modes necessary because they otherwise activate accidentally, etc. The only one I'd consider ok for casual users is the Surefire Sidekick, which is on the large side. Otherwise I'd pick an AAA light.
 
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