The Fenix-Store        
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 31 to 60 of 191

Thread: Philips LED bike light

  1. #31
    Flashaholic
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    109

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Quote Originally Posted by steverosburg View Post
    Okay, so the against-the-wall test is completely useless -- this thing throws down way more light than my P4's.

    Thanks again to swhs for recommending this light -- it was a bit of a pain to mod it, but it was well worth it for me.

    Steve, I concur with your impressions: If you shine it in a room, or against the wall it's not impressive. The Magicshine light is much more impressive in that respect as it puts out a lot more light (ca. double what the Philips light produces, and it really lights up a small room with 550 lumen).

    You really have to see it in action to appreciate the excellent beam (esp. on a road that's completely unlit you see how good it really is), the homogenous light distribution etc. My throw estimate is how far I can see 'something'. At 70 m, which is my estimate, it's pretty difficult to spot small stuff anyway as it's such a long way away! I may go into this in more detail at a later date with some example images.

    Philips has made a few more variations on this light btw., including a dynamo version. Yes it has been introduced, the version I asked them about early this year but I never got an answer. It is however smaller and produces less light. I hope it's better than the Edelux but I'll have to see. Someone I've been discussing lighting systems with (I'll tell more about that in the future) has talked with Philips on Eurobike and they were apparantly impressed with my website and are going to send me a dyno light so I can review it...

    Cool, that makes me a bit more interested again in doing some beamshots but I still need a good tripod. Any suggestions? (height must go to 1.80 m or heigher and it should not be too light so it won't be affected by windy conditions) Peter, I'm not that far from Almere, but a loan is no good, I will need one for long term use...

    Edit: And perhaps any suggestions for a digital camera that produces good video at night when just using the bike light? I think one needs a professional type camera to get really good results but perhaps not? I asked 'trout' (from http://troutie.com/) who made some pretty good videos in 2008/2009 when showing off his homemade lights, but that was with a bullet cam which needs a host, he told me.

    Edit 2: Perhaps the new Panasonic DMC-FX700 will be good for nighttime video (I'm waiting for a review of this one). Apparantly most digital camera's are pretty weak in low light conditions, and CCD based ones (instead of MOS) can give vertical stripes in the pictures/video when encountering strong light sources. This (those stripes) is something I wondered about with the ST70...


    Regards,

    Wouter
    Last edited by swhs; 09-10-2010 at 06:57 PM.

  2. #32
    *Flashaholic* Darell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    LOCO is more like it.
    Posts
    18,645

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    I've contacted Phillips (no reply yet) about NA distribution.

    Just checking in... anybody in North America have a line on purchasing these yet??

    Thanks for all the great reviews and input, guys! Tons TONS of work many of you have put into this!
    - Darell, the EVnut
    Email me: darelldd -at- gmail - I don't do PM.
    Is Tenacity just Badassity x 10?

  3. #33
    Flashaholic panicmechanic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    130

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Quote Originally Posted by Darell View Post
    Just checking in... anybody in North America have a line on purchasing these yet??
    Check here and following.
    Last edited by panicmechanic; 10-26-2010 at 03:27 AM.

  4. #34
    *Flashaholic* Darell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    LOCO is more like it.
    Posts
    18,645

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmechanic View Post
    Check here and following.
    Gaa! Thanks. I knew I'd seen a purchase link in this thread and looked all over for a live link. I added it to Steve's post above, and I'll put it here for handy use: Phillips light on bike24.com
    Last edited by Darell; 10-26-2010 at 12:49 PM.
    - Darell, the EVnut
    Email me: darelldd -at- gmail - I don't do PM.
    Is Tenacity just Badassity x 10?

  5. #35

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Bike24 is the definitely the way to go. The fact that you don't have to pay the VAT pretty much offsets the cost of shipping to the U.S.

    Now that I've had a chance to use this light for several weeks, I will give an update on my impressions:

    1. This is the best light I've ever seen for the road, it blows everything else I've used away in terms of usable light without offending oncoming motorists. I love it!

    2. The built-in AA batteries never gave me the advertised two hours of runtime, because I ride before dawn when it is the coldest. NiMH batteries do not perform well when the temperature gets down into the low 40's F or colder.

    3. My makeshift AA-powered external battery pack didn't end up extending the runtime as much as I had hoped, for the reason stated above. This light is power-hungry, and AA's can only deliver the necessary current over a wire when they're fresh off the charger. After a half hour or so the light shuts off.

    Since it's been getting progressively colder (39F this morning) as we approach winter and is completely dark from the start of my ride until I get back, I decided to take the plunge and commit to a heavy-duty external battery pack solution. I removed the internal AA batteries, and bought an external Li-Ion pack (this one, based on price/performance). I also needed a voltage regulator to convert the voltage, so I got this one from PowerStream, in the weather-proof variety. Li-Ion batteries are much less affected by the cold and have no problems delivering the necessary current. This battery pack also stores enough energy to power the light for 6-8 hours, even with the efficiency loss of the converter. The nice thing about using a wide-range converter like this is that I can use all kinds of external battery packs without being tied to a particular manufacturer or model.

    Keep in mind that I have a recumbent, so I'm not bothered by things like size and weight. I figure this is just about the most perfect setup you could possibly have, and it cost me about $300 total.

    One final note: as I mentioned in the past, when using an external battery pack you can ignore the battery indicator. It will start out at 3 bars and then decrease to 2, 1, and then none, even if you are running an external power supply like me. I experimented with this on a long ride, where I had the light on for 3 hours straight. At the half-way mark I noted that the light was down to 1 bar and switched the light off and back on -- the indicator light still showed one bar. I then finished my ride, with the indicator showing no bars for the last hour or so. As soon as I got home, I switched the light off, and then back on -- it still showed no bars. I unplugged the battery pack and plugged it back in, and then turned the light on -- this time it showed three full bars again. I concluded that there's some kind of simple internal timer that is calibrated for AA rechargeables (since, after all, that's what the system was designed for) rather than basing it on voltage, and when you recharge the light the circuit is reset to show a full charge. I don't even pay attention to the indicator now, because I know that my battery pack will last at least 6 hours under the most severe conditions, and I'm rarely in the dark for more than 3 hours at a time.

  6. #36
    *Flashaholic* Darell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    LOCO is more like it.
    Posts
    18,645

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Thanks for all the great input, Steve!

    For my needs - I already have a super-bright light with external battery. What I really, really want is a self-contained battery light. Your comments about NiMH battery life are a bummer to hear - but I'm also glad you made them! Of course for lots of money you can purchase Li AA batteries that would likely work really well. But that's not a solution for every day riding!

    If they were to refresh this unit with modern, more efficient emitters, the runtime could be increased significantly at the same output. Wouldn't that be dreamy? Truly, it is hard buying yesterday's emitters in a device that could be so much better. But I also totally understand how a design needs to be locked down to get it sold. Sometimes more knowledge just makes for more frustration!
    - Darell, the EVnut
    Email me: darelldd -at- gmail - I don't do PM.
    Is Tenacity just Badassity x 10?

  7. #37

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Quote Originally Posted by Darell View Post
    Thanks for all the great input, Steve!

    For my needs - I already have a super-bright light with external battery. What I really, really want is a self-contained battery light.
    This should work really well for you, then, as long as you don't need it for more than 1.5-2 hours at a time. That is my only complaint; if I were taking shorter rides, I would have been a very happy camper with the light as-is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Darell View Post
    Your comments about NiMH battery life are a bummer to hear - but I'm also glad you made them! Of course for lots of money you can purchase Li AA batteries that would likely work really well. But that's not a solution for every day riding!
    I'm not sure how much voltage the internal buck converter can handle, so I didn't want to try anything that I thought might damage the circuitry or the emitters. Also, as you mention it would not be practical for every day riding, and certainly would not be a cost-effective solution in the long term.

    Quote Originally Posted by Darell View Post
    If they were to refresh this unit with modern, more efficient emitters, the runtime could be increased significantly at the same output. Wouldn't that be dreamy? Truly, it is hard buying yesterday's emitters in a device that could be so much better. But I also totally understand how a design needs to be locked down to get it sold. Sometimes more knowledge just makes for more frustration!
    While they could certainly make it better, they wanted to make it practical and affordable, and they certainly achieved those goals. My needs are probably a bit better suited to the boutique manufacturers, but none of them had a light that could compete with this one when you consider the combination of total light output, beam pattern and initial cost. Once I saw how great the beam was on the road, I had no qualms about modifying it for an external battery pack; after all, the light only cost me $132, and at that price you can afford to risk a little for the perfect setup.

  8. #38
    Flashaholic
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    109

    Default Philips LBL vs. others

    Repost of my post of ca. 17 Feb. due to candlepowerforums having lost most messages of the last few months:

    -----

    At this time, when the results of Philips' enquiries into the runtime problems are (still) not yet known, everyone who wants one will need to be prepared for this problem and live with it or consider the LBL as an excellent lamp for modification using e.g. maxflex/blfex.

    There's not really an alternative. The Airstream that was mentioned on CPF since ca. August also isn't an alternative despite the results in the extremely flawed, if not to say incompetent or even bought-for review in Tour from Jan. 2011.

    When I read the partial article as provided by Supernova on their website, I got extremely annoyed at the blatant incompetence (and that's the friendly interpretation) of Tour. So, also taking into account various statements a guy called Gregor (Supernova employee) posted in the IBC forums (mtb-news.de) I lambasted in particular that Gregor guy and Supernova (but Tour as well), showing with calculations how utterly ridiculous their claims of lightoutput are.

    I stated then as I did early August here on cpf, that I believe the Airstream XP-G version puts out at most 240 lumen.

    I concluded with a challenge to send me, Olaf Schultz and 'Siam' a lamp for testing. Of course I knew they weren't going to send me one as they would really get kicked in the teeth then with side by side beamshots with the Philips LBL etc. But they did send a StVZO and XP-G version to 'Siam'...

    My criticism+challenge was a checkmate for Supernova (think about the questions/comments they would get if they didn't agree to my challenge, at least the measuring part) but Gregor didn't realise it yet, he continued with a silly comment that the Airstream-StVZO would be slightly better than the Philips LBL. Assuming he's seen both in action, he was talking BS (again!). And if he hadn't seen the LBL in action, then his earlier comment that the LBL's lightbeam was 'not bad at all, almost as good as that of the Airstream' was made up...

    Then on 14 Feb., the results from 'Siam' were in. I was right, the Airstream XP-G doesn't produce anything close to 370 lumen, it produces 217 lm, far less than the LBL (of which there are 2 measurements of different examples: 270 lm and 291 lm). The Airstream also has a diverging beam which means there's lots of light wasted on the side of the road (their beam is only useful if you have much more light to play with, say 600 lm). And the Airstream-StVZO (using XP-E R3) produces only 175 lm, no better than an Edelux from 2008. As the Philips LBL completely blows away any dynamo lamp I've seen so far including of course the Edelux (180 lm at 30 km/h), there is no way in hell that the Airstream StVZO is even close to the Philips LBL in both lightoutput and usable illumination of the road. I was already sure of that of course, but these measurements are a confirmation.

    So, what does it all mean: The test in Tour is proved once again (for those who don't listen to my arguments) as completely worthless as:
    - the LBL is much brighter, both in total lightoutput and as the light density on a given piece of road that the beams light up.
    - the LBL's beam is better as it is a much more homogenous beam (I'm not counting the bright loose bit near the front wheel, only the main beam).
    - Throw of the Airstream is nowhere near that of the LBL.

    This means Tour's ratings of the Airstream being brighter and having a better beam are complete and utter BS.

    Their beamshot of the LBL is also nonsensical, and can only be made by running the lamp in low mode... Idiots!


    For more information on Supernova's fairy tale lumen ratings but also beam quality etc., see my review pages of the E3 pro-StVZO

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~swhs/fiets/tests/verlichting/Supernova_e3_pro_stvzo/index_en.html

    the E3-triple

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~swhs/fiets/tests/verlichting/Supernova_e3_triple/index_en.html

    and my criticism page of the Tour article

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~swhs/fiets/varia/tour-verlichting-2011-1_en.html

    Those of you who want a set of scans of the complete Tour article (in German), send me an email...

    Oh yes, and Supernova claims (on their website) to have got 1st and 2nd place in the Tour test. This is disingenuous, as the tests consists of 2 categories: Dynamo and battery powered. So they didn't get the first 2 places, they got 1st place in the dynamo section, 2nd place in the battery section. I can hardly contain my disgust for these people and I'm seriously considering going back to my old stance, and never again do another test of Supernova stuff...

    When I get word from Philips about the results of their tests I will post another message. The batch after that should be fault free (Btw., I'm not sure what percentage of current LBLs have the runtime problems, perhaps it's all of them, perhaps just part, I just don't know).

  9. #39
    Flashaholic
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    109

    Default Philips LBL vs. Trelock LS 950

    The trelock LS950 could have been a competitor to the Philips LBL. From what I heard it has a Cree XP-G, if that was run at 1.5A it could have been, but it isn't...

    I first got a message from someone in Japan who has a bunch of headlamps with cutoff, and he said the LBL is much brighter and has a much wider beam (proper beamshots to follow).

    Then I read this review from a German guy who had it tested by a friend (I think that has to be Olaf Schultz, as I can't imagine anyone else doing such tests; his pages deserve a lot more recognition btw., but writing in 2 languages is a pain as I know from my own website. Google's translation I think sucks pretty badly so his pages unfortunately are only recognized for their quality by those who read German).

    The link is : http://www.radforum.de/trelock-ls-95...-a-187431.html

    I will give a summary:
    - Mounting bracket is crap.
    - Bright beam, but narrower than Ixon IQ/Cyo etc. (also appears brighter because of cooler light colour)
    - Nice to use (display, buttons etc.)
    - Beam has more artefacts than the B&M lamps & of course the Philips (the Philips beam is the smoothest I've ever seen, the later B&M beams from their reflectors with 5 blades are also crap because of the hotspot in the middle)
    - measured: 127 lm on the grid (this is not the total lightoutput, but the section on the wall, at least that's what I assume as O.Schultz does such measurements in his tables, and otherwise there shouldn't be a mention of "the grid").
    - current through the LED: 0.65A
    - LED apparantly XP-G

    Well, at 0.65A the Xp-G could give 243 lm, but you all should know by now that the XP-G doesn't produce what the datahseets promise (see my other posts on the LBL vs. Airstream in August). I expect at 0.65A ca. 187 lm, deduct 10% optical losses and you get 168 lm. Perhaps round down a bit as not all light may be captured by the optic, so lets assume 160 lm. This is almost as much as the Airstream-StVZO (175 lm), and nowhere near the 270 or more of the LBL.

    It's clear: The Philips LBL remains king in usable lightoutput and beam quality. Supernova Airstream & Trelock LS 950 are no match at all.

    So, what about Dosun D1 & Big bang?
    - Big bang is probably best except for light colour. I have no sample to test though.
    - Dosun D1 has low lux rating which means little light at the top of the beam which means throw can't be that good.

    I hope to get more information on the D1 vs. Big Bang vs LBL from Japan in the not too distant future...

    Oh, btw., on my Supernova E3 pro-StVZO review page I made some estimates of the lightoutput of the E3-pro-StVZO and E3-pro-XP-G. Claimed output 305 and 370 lumen.
    My estimates: Less than half that...
    Last edited by swhs; 03-10-2011 at 03:47 PM. Reason: typos and missing words...

  10. #40

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    swhs,

    Thanks for your continued testing! Now that I've seen your reviews I couldn't be more happy that I chose to go with the Philips LBL and just modded it for extended runtime. At the end of the day what matters most is consistent, quality light output, and the Philips LBL has that in spades. It really is a shame that SuperNova is exaggerating their stats so much that they completely destroy their credibility.

    I'm so happy with my Philips LBL setup that I don't really care about new technology that may come out now (unless it's to get a backup Philips LBL just in case my ever dies). I'm so happy with the total light output and beam pattern that there is absolutely no need for improvement upon what I already have.

    -Steve

  11. #41
    Flashaholic
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    109

    Default Light output measurements

    Quote Originally Posted by steverosburg View Post
    swhs,
    It really is a shame that SuperNova is exaggerating their stats so much that they completely destroy their credibility.
    For me that isn't the worst. Most manufacturers used to give LED datasheet based values, but since LED output values have been published by people with proper measuring equipment, this should have gone away long ago. Lupine for example since quite a while measures (and their published values now confirm what was measured by various people before that). Philips said about the LBL (website + packaging of the LBL) that it produces at least 270 lumen, and it does. I think they were one of the first to not give BS values but measured values.

    It's not really necessary to measure a lamp for a close estimate: Just take the measurements of a given LED at the given current, deduct 10%-15% optical losses and you are fairly close to the real output (assuming no heat dissipation problems)

    Btw., I noticed Supernova have removed the main graphic that said places 1+2 in the test in 'Tour' go to Supernova... It's still in the news section though.

    What's the worst thing about them is simply the way they act. How they dealt with StVZO approval delays, unavailability, etc., and their (well this Gregor's) derogatory comments about other lamps etc. They are simply not cool (and that's putting it friendly).

    And the values they quote for their dynamo lamps are even worse because the current isn't what it must be to even achieve datasheet level values they give, and then, the XP-E isn't in the datasheet at 305 lm, you have to drive it at more than what Cree says you should do (1A), but of course, Supernova does no such thing, it's driven comfortably below 1A.

  12. #42
    Unenlightened
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    I've just purchase this light and was hoping that the knowledgeable members here could help answer a few questions.
    I'll be using this light for a 2hr city commute as well as long distance audax rides. For the commuting the supplied NiMH rechargeable AA's should be fine.
    For the audax riding I'll want to get as long a run times as possible. Although it's a bit of a hassle to open the light I'm prepared swap out the batteries during the ride. (steverisburg’s solution of wiring extra batteries in parallel looks good, but I won't go that far just yet).
    The documentation supplied with the light states that the light should only be used with rechargeable batteries.
    Assuming one does not attempt to plug in the charger while the light is loaded with standard alkali or lithium batteries, is there any reason why one could not/should not use standard batteries? Do the voltages of standard and rechargeable differ much? - enough to cause damage?
    The light will switch from hi power to low power when the batteries run low. I assume that the trigger for this is a drop in voltage. Is there a large variation in the drop in voltage with different battery types / brands?
    Most rechargeable batteries display their capacity info (mAh), but this info is not that easy to find for alkali and lithium batteries.
    Which battery types/brands will give me the longest run times on a light like this?
    -I’ll do some tests to determine this myself as well

  13. #43

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    The voltages on NiMH, Lithium, and Alkaline cells did not affect the output of blinky lights after the first few minutes in my test. So I would expect the more sophisticated driver in the Phillips to show no effect due to voltage. I did not do a runtime test as thee NiMH would run 8 hours in the more powerful blinky which was all I expected to need and could carry more cells if needed.

    On Audax rides, are you planning on losing the weight of dead Alkalines or Lithiums rather than carry spent NiMhs to the end of the competition to be recharged? I also found that neither the Alkaline nor Lithium AAAs I used had any capacity listed. The NiMH AAAs were 1000 mAhr rated. Maybe someone has run time data on the chemistries in the flashlight section you can infer from?

  14. #44

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Quote Originally Posted by thesloth View Post
    I'll be using this light for a 2hr city commute as well as long distance audax rides. For the commuting the supplied NiMH rechargeable AA's should be fine.
    Good luck, I only get 1 hour 40-45mins out of mine

    The documentation supplied with the light states that the light should only be used with rechargeable batteries.
    Assuming one does not attempt to plug in the charger while the light is loaded with standard alkali or lithium batteries, is there any reason why one could not/should not use standard batteries? Do the voltages of standard and rechargeable differ much? - enough to cause damage?
    The light can only work with NiMH rechargeable batteries because of the LED driver.
    The voltage across the LEDs are 6.1 - 6.49V which means the driver is a boost converter, and input voltage must be less than output voltage.


    The light will switch from hi power to low power when the batteries run low. I assume that the trigger for this is a drop in voltage.
    Yes.
    With my light the minimum input voltage is 4V.

    Which battery types/brands will give me the longest run times on a light like this?
    I decided to modify my light to use an external LiION 7,4V (2S2P) battery (a MS900-battery from DX)
    The LED driver in the light needs a input voltage of 4 - 6.1V so I decided to use a 5V DC-DC converter from DX!
    http://www.dealextreme.com/p/vmp3202...c-module-47815
    Data sheet: http://img.v-module.com/datasheets/DS_VMP3202_3.pdf
    The DC-DC converter is cheap and so small that it fits inte the battery compartment, and it is so effective that with the MS900-battery connected the light housing gets warmer then the DC-DC converter!

    If anybody is interested I can try to get a few photos.

  15. #45

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Quote Originally Posted by HakanC View Post

    If anybody is interested I can try to get a few photos.
    Hi,

    I would be very interested in some pictures and more details of your mods.

    Thanks
    Alex

  16. #46

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Here is a pic of the parts

    The DC-DC converter needs a (max)5V enable, I used a 4,7V zener and a resistor.


    My test setup

    The DC-DC convertor only gets warm, not hot at all.


    Finished, there is plenty of room for the electronis in the battery compartment.

    (With the light upside down)


    But there is a drawback; the light will only shine on max for 45min, then I have to disconnect the battery, reconnect again and then it will shine for another 45min, and then you will have to repeat again until the battery is drained.
    Apparently the battery monitoring circuit in the light includes a timer based on initial battery voltage.

    My next modification of the light will be to replace all of the electronics with a LFlex
    http://www.taskled.com/lflex.html
    a b2Flex would be more efficient but the higher overhead voltage for it means that I wouldn't be able to use the same battery.
    But that will take another two months or so.


    /Håkan
    SWEDEN

  17. #47

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Quote Originally Posted by HakanC View Post
    Here is a pic of the parts
    /Håkan
    SWEDEN
    Really appreciate your fast reply. I ordered the Phillips few day ago (based off the review here) from Germany, should receive it some time next week.

    As it is, I guess, with most people impatiently waiting on some new toy to arrive. I have been busy running around based off your impression on what might be a useful mod.

    The few little down sides for me (based on read impressions) are the 2 Hour battery life, no blink option (no biggie, but still).

    If I was an electronics guru, then I would definitely try to mod the entire thing (similar to yours) to use a Li ion for extended capacity (3-4hours). On the long run (if its not hard) would also add some thing that will make it strobe capability (high-low-strobe-off). I can solder and stuff, just not enough knowledge to know what needs changing.

    Hence I asked for your solution, with is basically what I expected to have to do, just didn't think the voltage cut off would get so off that the base electronic would think that the battery is too low and you have the unplug it every 45mins.

    The further mod that you are planing seems (if I get your right) to solve that problem. I guess its not an expensive mod. So it would be great. The LFlex I mean (although I dont really know what it is exactly, even after reading up on the spec sheet).

    If I am correct it not just cutting and soldering like you did (withthe LFlex), but having to also do some programing on the chip, to set things like when to cut-off or what % of power to supple for "low" switch". Or are those all fixed?

    I guess in the mean time I will just use it stock when it arrive and go from them (probably based off of your further developments)

    Sorry if my questions sound stupid. I get the impression the you are knowledgeable in this stuff.

    I also have another (rather simple) project on my mind right now. Only need a little help with selecting the right components and making the right decision about circuitry (stuff like should it be serial or parallel connection). So if you dont mind, could you help me out with some advice.

    This is what I want to accomplish on my bike: http://www.lunasee.com/?page_id=74

    I am sure its easy for you to comprehend the concept for the video.
    (only difference is I would use batteries not dynamo)

    Its a very basic and simple concept. Also has some fun factor.
    All it need is:

    1. Some photo-luminescent (adhesive tape). This I will stick carefully to the rims. Already ordered them (really cheap stuff, hope its not too poor quality).
    2. 4 LED's (the tighter the trow the better)
    3. 4x rechargeable AA batteries.
    4. Other little stuff like: Battery holder, water resistant compartment, resistor(s), wires, fittings, etc.

    My questions are as follows (And the problem for me is that the answer to one modifies the answer to the other)...

    (Remember I will need 4 LEDs, 2 on each wheel, 1 on each side, the will be focused and positioned very close to the rim side, that is about 1cm max distance to what the are illuminating). See 2nd picture on the page: http://www.lunasee.com/?page_id=25
    1. What LED to consider. I am sure I wont need anything powerful, but have no idea what might be too low (lumes / output wise). Here is a spec: 5mm natural bright LED with 0.06W power draw, 3-3.4V (@20mA), 11000-13000 MCD (say "led brightness", not really sure how this translates to lumens), 15' view angle (trow I guess, so this part should be fine).
    2. If the above spec LED is optimal (not too bright, not too low) then how would it be wise to wire to say 4x rechargeable Alkaline AA batteries (say 2400mA each)? The LEDs Paralell or serial? How about batteries, should those be parallel or serial.
    3. Do I need to add any resistors or would I be better of with a regulator like you used? I have looked at circuits for LED connection and understand why and of that might be needed. If I use the above LED then I guess if all those are in parallel connection then the 2x AA bateries (2x1.5V=3V) would drive them at rated voltage (the 2 extra AAs would be in parallel to that just to double the duration of the batteries). Just not sure about the current thing (which is what the resistors are need for right, so as not to blow the LEDs?).

    Is the above logic even close to reality? If yes, then how long would the setup last before needing a recharge (anything above 6 hours if fine for me). I have a gut feeling that the goal (sufficient light for the rotating stripe) doesn't need much lumen and that the above setup might already be an overkill, but I have no way to figure out how much it does. Also dont have the slightest idea what lumens the above led is based of the MCD and power draw rating.
    Basically how would you do it in my place? All the components are cheap, so some try and error is fine, but I still need to narrow it down a bit.

    I am sorry if the "too many" questions are overwhelming and I will really appreciate any input on your part.
    Thank you.
    Alex

  18. #48

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Does anyone know if switching out the 2450mAh NiMH cells with 2700mAh, ones would increase the time in use? Or would that be a problem with the stock charging?
    Last edited by oalex; 06-27-2011 at 08:43 AM.

  19. #49
    Unenlightened
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmechanic View Post
    Check here and following.

    I live in the US. Mucho thanks to Wouter for all the info. I know I can order this from bike24.com. The pic on that site of the charger shows a European plug. It also says you can charge via usb on computer. I'm a dunce with electricity. If I plug this thing into a computer in the US will it charge correctly?

    Thanks.

    PS i was all set to order the Airstream until I found you guys.

  20. #50

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    ^^ Increasing the mAhr rating about 10% from 2450 to 2700 mAHr will increase run time by about 10%.

  21. #51

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    I hopt that it is OK to post links to other Forums here
    http://reviews.mtbr.com/philips-safe...ights-shootout

  22. #52

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    I've been using the dynamo version of this Phillips light for the past few months on my commute home from work. I am pretty happy with it. In terms of light output and beam spread I think it's better for commuting that the e-delux, although the latter may well be preferable in other circumstances. The e-delux also seems to be better quality in physical terms and also seems to have a brighter standlight for some reason. The discussion on this thread appears entirely devoted to the battery version of this Phillips light, (maybe because it has a higher output on paper) and there are a couple of mentions of 'converting' it to dyno power. Do people realise that there is a dynamo version? BTW, Bike24 and Roseversand have proved excellent sources if you are not in the Eu.
    Savvas

  23. #53

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    I am using the dynamo Philips on my folder. For me it is somewhat of a niche application. Because of the metal housing it is more likely to survive the cramped conditions inside luggage compared to the plastic IQ Cyo. Otherwise, the beam of the latter is brighter, better ordered and its standlight is well superior. I have to admit though that there exist some situations the erratic, accidentally spread out beam of Philips ends up being of some benefit, likely more by accident rather than design.

  24. #54
    Enlightened a1penguin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    It seems that the Philips LBL battery powered light comes in three brightness levels: 40, 60 or 80 lux. Does anyone have experience with the 60 lux model? The price seems to scale linearly with lux. I'm tempted by this light. It's a bummer that it's not sold in North America.

    Trust the Germans to take some low powered LEDs and a bit of math to design a reflector and make an awesome bike light!

  25. #55
    Unenlightened
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Have had this light bout 12 months now tis a great light shame about the poor run time ,I only get 1hr15 on max,does anyone know if the newer models been sorted to run on max the stated time of 2 hours

  26. #56
    Flashaholic Marcturus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    230V~
    Posts
    314

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    Quote Originally Posted by a1penguin View Post
    It seems that the Philips LBL battery powered light comes in three brightness levels: 40, 60 or 80 lux. Does anyone have experience with the 60 lux model? The price seems to scale linearly with lux. I'm tempted by this light. It's a bummer that it's not sold in North America.
    Personally, I wouldn't take any other optics than the 80 lux one, it's the original, the rest is just interference by marketing. swhs did compare the two.

    Here is a pdf showing the 40, 60 and 80 lux products, as well as the tail lights (which will not be unusually bright). Have not found it in English, but I wonder who stole the lux scale from the colorful graphics and who allowed the 40 lux joke to look like a sorry piece of 1980's Soviet consumer(?) plastics.
    http://www.produktinfo.conrad.com/da...LUX_DYNAMO.pdf

  27. #57
    Flashaholic
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    109

    Default Philips LED bike light: Driver mod for 2 hour runtime on high.

    Allright, I have some interesting mods to share:

    http://swhs.home.xs4all.nl/fiets/tes...icatie_en.html

  28. #58

    Ohgeez Re: Philips LBL vs. Trelock LS 950

    Quote Originally Posted by swhs View Post
    The trelock LS950 could have been a competitor to the Philips LBL. From what I heard it has a Cree XP-G, if that was run at 1.5A it could have been, but it isn't...
    The link is : http://www.radforum.de/trelock-ls-95...-a-187431.html

    I will give a summary:
    - Mounting bracket is crap.
    - Bright beam, but narrower than Ixon IQ/Cyo etc. (also appears brighter because of cooler light colour)
    - Nice to use (display, buttons etc.)
    - Beam has more artefacts than the B&M lamps & of course the Philips (the Philips beam is the smoothest I've ever seen, the later B&M beams from their reflectors with 5 blades are also crap because of the hotspot in the middle)

    It's clear: The Philips LBL remains king in usable lightoutput and beam quality. Supernova Airstream & Trelock LS 950 are no match at all.
    Hi all, hi Wouter!

    I must protest.

    I cannot underline the cons! I think swhs had read my new posts. Or not?

    i bought my LS 950 in April and wrote something in
    http://www.radforum.de/trelock-ls-95...-a-187431.html

    -the mounting bracket is not the best, but you can mount it the other way around (look at my photos)
    -tape the bracket, because is not tight enough (after this, i have a better feeling as to a pbl bracket)
    -more artefacts like the ixon or the pbl?

    swhs don't like the B&M beams from their reflectors with 5 blades. I know only this one and i like the cyo 40 beam! But it is only (80-100lm) 40 lux.

    my pro and cons:

    |PBL|

    +metal case
    +wide beam (two Leds)
    +(short) nearfield

    -not brighter as LS 950 (my subjective feeling)
    -no switch protection
    -short nearfield
    -akkus not easily to change
    -ca. 70/90min. on high


    |LS 950|

    +long running time on high, 6h!
    +5 dimming steps
    +ca. 48h on lowest
    +accu capacity display (5 steps) and exact time display in hour and minutes 6-48h)
    +solid bracket
    +overheating protection (one dimming step lower)
    +quick connect on the bracket
    +small form
    (+can be used as an flashlight)

    -thin beam
    -no nearfield
    -no switch protection
    -bracket "hard" to mount
    -bracket expensive (11,- Eur)
    -no bolted bracket for oversize handlebar

    "It's clear: The Philips LBL remains king in usable lightoutput and beam quality. Supernova Airstream & Trelock LS 950 are no match at all."

    No, all of them are no match! Waiting of a better lamp in 2012 or 2013.

  29. #59

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    delete because of double
    Last edited by lampenjung; 12-30-2011 at 12:01 PM. Reason: double post

  30. #60

    Default Re: Philips LED bike light

    [QUOTE=lampenjung; Waiting of a better lamp in 2012 or 2013.[/QUOTE]

    Is it clear that there is to be a revision or a new model in 2012/12? Reference somewhere?

    Thanks,

    Savvas.

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •