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Thread: Dead TV, what to do?

  1. #1

    Default Dead TV, what to do?

    My 2006 Sony Wega 42' Projection HD cooked it's bulb last year. It's been collecting dust since.

    I decided to look into a replacement bulb.

    I can pay $200 for a bonafide replacement bulb.

    OR

    I can pay $80ish for a knockoff bulb.

    OR

    I can junk the TV and get a new flat screen for less than $500.


    Here's my conundrum. I paid $1300 for this television in 2006. I want to fix it, but I'm afraid to invest $200 in the old TV, because it may have other parts ready to go bad. It looks pretty dust comtaminated, and I'm skeptical it's picture will ever be 100% again. Frankly, in working order it's only worth $200 at best.

    The gray market knockoff bulb idea seemed like a winner. Then research revealed they have a hit & miss reputation for life and performance. Most only last 150ish hours or die within 3-4 months of routine use.

    The last option is to junk the TV and get a new TV. A friend of mine explained that I could harvest the screen and make some kind of wicked light magnification survival device... he offered me $50 to cannibalize the set to make a "Fresnel cooker".

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wprlzCDfLm8

    (Representative, not my friend. Heck yes, I googled his idea.)


    What would you do?
    Last edited by DaisyCutter; 07-15-2011 at 12:39 PM. Reason: additional info

  2. #2
    Flashaholic* skyfire's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    I say junk it! those TVs dont last long even after you fix them... another problem with them is the capacitor.
    those Tvs went obselete fast. picture quality on them isnt great either. get whatever you can for it, and make room for a newer TV.

    i paid $2000 for my 55" LCD, and a few months later i saw it for $1500. and im sure its less than that now. these new technological electronics arent an investment. over time itll be worth less and less.
    Last edited by skyfire; 07-15-2011 at 01:41 PM.

  3. #3
    Flashaholic*
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    +1.

    Quote Originally Posted by DaisyCutter View Post
    The last option is to junk the TV and get a new TV.

  4. #4
    Flashaholic* bshanahan14rulz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    reminds me of this, but smaller: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0_nuvPKIi8

    Lenses are fun to play with. Throw optics in a box and save for later.

  5. #5
    Flashaholic* Sub_Umbra's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Long ago in a galaxy far away, when I was a kid, I can remember a TV repairman actually coming to our house and fixing it right on the spot. Light-years ago...

    Junk it -- it was never designed to be maintained or fixed. Heck, I'd be hard pressed to find someone who can work on a pair of shoes in the city I live in, let alone a TV.
    Last edited by Sub_Umbra; 07-15-2011 at 04:40 PM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    you are lucky - you have full justification for an upgrade . you have 'worn out the old tv' and it is not 'economically viable' to repair and if repaired is 'superceded technology'.
    you have the green light to go shopping for a new toy . enjoy ! .

  7. #7
    Flashaholic* Lite_me's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Junk it! I echo the comments above. I just gave away a perfect working 2006 34" CRT HD TV just to get rid of it so I could upgrade. Got a 46" 1080P LCD and I'm ecstatic over the new one. The picture is sooo much better. I love it! I think so will you.
    "People don't plan to fail, they fail to plan."

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Normally I might say try and repair it in the interests of avoiding landfill, etc. In this case though the replacement is superior, and uses far less power (often a good enough reason for replacement even if the original is functional). Some things just aren't worth repairing. This is one of them. Salvage anything interesting from the set, but other than that, not worth spending any time bothering with it.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    I think it is a toss up.... if you get a few years out of a $200 bulb the tv you would have bought now to replace it vs a new tv when it finally fails that would be better and probably near $200 cheaper.
    Last edited by Lynx_Arc; 07-15-2011 at 06:03 PM.
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  10. #10

    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    I vote for option 4. Junk it.



    That's it. Don't replace it.
    Got Biodiesel?

  11. #11

    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Make a fresnel death ray.
    If the power goes out you could cook and boil water with it. Or just destroy stuff.

  12. #12
    Flashaholic* LukeA's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    TVs (esp. projection models) depreciate so fast you should just replace it.

    Don't forget to take out the sweet lens that does the projecting.
    A little madness never hurt anybody.

  13. #13
    Flashaholic* LukeA's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sub_Umbra View Post
    Long ago in a galaxy far away, when I was a kid, I can remember a TV repairman actually coming to our house and fixing it right on the spot. Light-years ago...

    Junk it -- it was never designed to be maintained or fixed. Heck, I'd be hard pressed to find someone who can work on a pair of shoes in the city I live in, let alone a TV.
    Nope. Plasma and Projection TVs are designed to be calibrated and repaired. Everything is just modular circuit boards. Usually the work is performed under warranty.

    I've met TV repairmen who do house calls and there are two cobblers within 5 miles of me. They are both going to retire in not too many years.
    A little madness never hurt anybody.

  14. #14
    Flashaholic* LEDAdd1ct's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    I tore my triceps tendon, so I haven't been able to lift/use my left arm/hand, but I did ask a friend and his brother to help (lift) a 27" 4:3 SONY Trinitron out to the curb. Made in 1992, another friend and I found it by the curb 2 miles away in 2000/2001, and kept it out of the dumpster for ten years in service in my family room downstairs. I can't afford an LCD or plasma, so I am waiting for a local CRT set that can display 720p and 1080i to become available for $50 or less. I watch very little television, but it would be nice to upgrade!

    As for the OP:

    If you can get $100 for it, sell it. Otherwise, cannibalize it for the lens, and feel wholly justified in purchasing something newer.

    (typed slowly with one hand)


    LEDAdd1ct

  15. #15
    Flashaholic* ebow86's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    I say junk it, not worth the risk of buying a $200 bulb and having something else break or finding out something else is broken besides the bulb. Use that money towards a new TV.
    My Lights Here

  16. #16
    *Flashaholic* PhotonWrangler's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    I agree that it's probably time to replace it with a flat screen tv.

    Open it up and look at the electrolytic capacitors closely, particularly the tops of them. If there's any sign of bulging or leakage, it's definitely time to scrap it and save a few parts from it (optics). And those bulbs generate lots of waste heat and will only become harder to find over time.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Quote Originally Posted by ebow86 View Post
    I say junk it, not worth the risk of buying a $200 bulb and having something else break or finding out something else is broken besides the bulb. Use that money towards a new TV.
    +1> Go for a flat screen HD TV. The latest backlighting on them is LED instead of fluorescent. Sony, LG, and Panasonic are the high end brands. The crisp and sharp detail of the HD picture is amazing and actually took me some time to get used to!
    Last edited by Marmaduke; 07-16-2011 at 04:09 PM.

  18. #18
    Flashaholic* skyfire's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    be very CAREFUL if you decide to salvage parts from it. typically, the capacitors used for those TVs can hold quite a charge.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    I'd tend to agree, junk it. My father has a 60" Sony SXRD rear projection, it looked great when he got it but I prefer even a cheap 1080p 40" Toshiba LCD to it with a fresh bulb now.

    Of course a plasma would have been the ideal choice for picture quality back then but they were a LOT more expensive and had more issues back then.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Ask it this way:

    Would you pay $80 for a used 42" TV?

    I probably would. If you can really get it to work with an $80 bulb, I would do that and use it until something more expensive dies. Heck, $80 is how much the average person spends on only one month of cable/sat/dish whatever, right? That's not a lot of money for TV entertainment.

  21. #21
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    Default

    Put in a SST-90!

    Joking, I'd say you should get a new TV. You can find some older TVs on sale in most places. A plasma TV would give you a very good value if you want a big TV

  22. #22
    Flashaholic cdrake261's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Rip lens and mirrors out, convert that into a homemade project.

    http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-...LED-Projector/

  23. #23
    Flashaholic* LEDAdd1ct's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Quote Originally Posted by LEDAdd1ct View Post
    I can't afford an LCD or plasma, so I am waiting for a local CRT set that can display 720p and 1080i to become available for $50 or less. I watch very little television, but it would be nice to upgrade!
    Just to follow up, I scored a 34" (86.36 cm) 16:9 Sony flat screen CRT HDTV with stand for $75.00 off the local craigslist. It has the same picture tube as the best consumer Sony CRT HDTV ever made, and retailed for $1,200. It is in the garage right now, since it is too heavy for me to lift. Once a few burly gentlemen come over and lift it into its new home, it will be enjoyed thoroughly. It has an integrated ATSC (digital) tuner, two component inputs and an HDMI input, plus s-video and composite.

    So if you can't afford or don't want to spend the money on the latest and greatest, for under $100.00 (and sometimes much less) you can get a spectacular picture with phenomenal black levels, zero ghosting, and close to 180 degree viewing angles.

    I discovered this site recently, and except for the ads (which are annoying, but not prohibitively so) I used it to track down the TVs in my area. A lot of these will wind up in landfills, which is sad. On the "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle," ladder, reusing is second from the best, so grabbing one of these on the cheap can bring you a sense of satisfaction in putting fewer materials into a landfill.

    Let us know what you decide to do.


    LEDAdd1ct
    Last edited by LEDAdd1ct; 07-28-2011 at 12:33 PM.

  24. #24
    Flashaholic* snakebite's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    get just the lamp and install it in your housing.
    buy from a dealer that has a good gaurantee and sells only original osram or phillips lamps.
    if it played good just before the lamp went fix it.
    if it was getting discolored areas or bright/dead pixels junk it as the light engine is failing.

  25. #25
    Flashaholic* EZO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Two weeks ago I went through more or less this same experience with a 5 year old black Macbook computer. I spent about a month trying to troubleshoot my home wi-fi network because I kept losing the signal. Long story short, it turned out to be a failing wi-fi card in the computer that worked intermittently until it failed completely.

    I took it to the only authorized Mac dealer in town (where I've been a long time customer) and the owner told me that it would cost close to $200 to replace the card (it would be a used or refurbished card) and even then it might turn out to be the logic board and so on and so forth and it really wasn't worth it to put money into such an old machine, etc., etc., etc. Then he tried to sell me a new Macbook Pro.

    Well, for one thing this laptop does everything I need in a laptop for the time being as I do all my computer "heavy lifting" on two powerful desktop machines in my office. For another thing, this would not be the ideal time for me to blow 1500 bucks or more on a new computer that I primarily use to surf the internet, show jobs to clients and do basic word processing on. Finally, I've previously installed a much larger, higher speed hard drive in this machine and maxed out the amount of ram it will accept, so along with all the latest software updates this little old laptop performs pretty admirably.

    So I went home to weigh my options and found a reliable dealer on eBay that offered a used 802.11n card (which would be an upgrade from my 802.11g card) for 26 bucks delivered, with a 12 month warranty.

    Well, taking the computer apart was a bit of a challenge because this generation of Macbooks has a bit of a Chinese puzzle like design (For example, looking at a row of ten identical screws you need to remove screws number 2,4,7 and 9) but all in all not too bad and the web site iFix-it was a great help.

    In the end my computer is fully repaired and upgraded to the 802.11n protocol for 26 dollars total and I am entirely delighted and even feeling a little smug about how the whole thing worked out.

    Obviously, risking 26 dollars is different than 200 but if you can find a source for the lamp you need at a good price it could well be worth the risk.

    When I've told this story to a few people I know I've gotten the same weird comment. "He was just doing his job!" Really? To me having someone try to convince a customer that it is in his best interests to throw away a perfectly good computer and buy a new one is like taking your car to the dealership and having them tell you that you need a new water pump but, hey, the transmission or engine could go on you at any moment so it would be better to let us sell you a new car.

    There seems to be a real disconnect in our society between all the popular talk about sustainability and the notion of living in a throw away consumer culture. I vote for trying to repair the TV if it really only needs a basic part and the rest of the unit is OK. Like snakebite says, find a reliable lamp dealer and if the price is good it should be worth the risk. You just might be pleasantly surprised with the results.
    Last edited by EZO; 07-29-2011 at 09:44 AM.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Quote Originally Posted by snakebite View Post
    get just the lamp and install it in your housing.
    buy from a dealer that has a good guarantee and sells only original osram or phillips lamps.
    if it played good just before the lamp went fix it.
    if it was getting discolored areas or bright/dead pixels junk it as the light engine is failing.
    Check the capacitors for any sign of bulging ... They might well be all OK ... My 13 year old Sony CRT 32" set is still going strong in my Daughters house ... The only snag with it is that it is a two-man lifting job when she decorates.

    Your set is only about five years old ... If you can get another five years for the cost of a genuine bulb , then go for it ... When that bulb eventually blows , get a new set.
    .

  27. #27
    Flashaholic* LEDAdd1ct's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Or, post it on Craigslist, be explicit and honest about the problem in your listing, and try and get half the cost of the bulb.

    Technology is a bummer when it comes to recouping costs.

  28. #28

    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    is there a future for projection tv. i had one for a week in a holiday unit once. it was big and worked but wasnt awe inspiring. wasnt a sony either. you see them side by side with flat panel plasma and lcd in the shop and they appear the poor cousin. cheers

  29. #29

    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    I have 61" Sony, if the CRTs go out, you bet your ass I will buy a premium replacement bulb. Hahahaha people here spend 200 on a light but not on a bulb to save a big screen tv!

  30. #30
    *Flashaholic* PhotonWrangler's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dead TV, what to do?

    Quote Originally Posted by beerwax View Post
    is there a future for projection tv. i had one for a week in a holiday unit once. it was big and worked but wasnt awe inspiring. wasnt a sony either. you see them side by side with flat panel plasma and lcd in the shop and they appear the poor cousin. cheers
    Personally I've never liked projection TVs (with the possible exception of one DMD set that I saw). The rear-projection surface tends to add a milky appearance to the picture, and all of the projeciton technologies have a light emitting device (bulb or CRT) that is pushed really hard in one way or another.

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