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Thread: MTB to road bike

  1. #1
    Flashaholic* flownosaj's Avatar
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    Default MTB to road bike

    Long post, but it goes to illustrate what CPF can do for a guy like me when it doesn't even deal with flashlights.

    With all the conversation in the advice on MTBs, I began to think about riding again. I've had my Trek Singletrack up on the garage wall, but seeing that thread got me thinking. It's so hot here in TX that I haven't ridden since we moved here two years ago, but now Fall is here.

    I talked to a colleague of mine and she suggested that since I've got the MTB, how about doing some "road biking" for a while. I stopped at the local bike dealer (thanks for pointing me in that direction guys) last night to see what he had in stock and he told me that a touring bike would be the ticket. He just happened to have one in my size at the shop next town over. A Cannondale no less.
    I stop there this afternoon on my way home and they take me in the back and bring the bike down off the rack. I rode it around and liked it and asked the price. The mechanic calls the "boss-man" here in Killeen and tells him that I was the guy from last night that came to look at the Cannondale.

    Boss-man says $200! The mechanic kept asking, "you're taking about the Cannondale tourer, right?" [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]
    Now I know diddly about road bikes, and I believe that it's a '98-99 but this thing is a Cannondale T600 touring bike in great condition and has Exiage 400 LX derailleurs and Diacompe 986 cantilever brakes. I figured that I better take it before he realized he quoted the price on the wrong one [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img] I mean, the Cannondale name alone means it was probably 3-4 times that amount new...

    I'm planning on looking this model up tonight after dinner. Someone out there have one and can tell me about it? Any immediate upgrades (other than trip computer, already have a good one) I can do? I already think I may want to do the brakes, but I've got to take it out later this evening to see what I think.

    Yeah, I would have liked a fanicer one with all the primo stuff, but I'm happy [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Flashaholic* snakebite's Avatar
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    Default Re: MTB to road bike

    sounds like somebody goofed.
    you did buy it didnt you?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: MTB to road bike

    $200 for a Cannondale road bike? Woo Hoo !
    You can't even go to Toys R Us and get that heavy Pacific road bike for $200! Especially if all the components are in working order, you practically stole the bike in my opinion.
    I'm not much of a road bike person, but seemed to be a good way to train and get in tons of miles. So, I bought the most inexpensive Trek road bike available for about $600 I think it was? Through some technicality on a coupon the bike shop put out, I was able to get the bike for $400! Changed the saddle, brakes and pedals and it makes for a good inexpensive trainer for those long rides. First time I did a Century (100 miles), my butt was aching. . . Have fun with the bike.

  4. #4
    Flashaholic* flownosaj's Avatar
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    Default Re: MTB to road bike

    I tried to find out more about it last night before my internet stopped working. Didn't work this morning, so I'm taking advantage of my lunchbreak privledges [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

    Not too much exists on this bike--found out it was out in the early to mid 90's and that it retailed for about $1,200. And that's about it.

    I went over the bike as much as I could with the little time I had available last night. Everything seems to be in perfect working order. I may just decide to put new tires on as I'm afraid dry-rot would lead to a high speed blowout. Nothing really wrong with them, but once I found out the age and saw a few "lines" around the wall, I'd rather not take chances.
    Not completley happy with the shift levers being on the downtube, but for that little annoyance compared to the price I paid, I don't need shimano rapid fire indexed shifters on the bars.
    Brakes are okay. These may be the first to be replaced. Not a big fan of the cantilevers, but what can ya do [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/yellowlaugh.gif[/img]

    Hopefully I can get home early enough so I can take a short ride. If not, then I've got the weekend.

    -Jason

  5. #5
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    Default Re: MTB to road bike

    Some info on Cannondales...

    I rode a Cannondale touring bike from about 1991 to about 1999.

    Generally speaking, Cannondale through the 1990s offered MTBs, Road Race bikes and Road Touring bikes.

    In each line of bike, they (generally) had the same frame with different component groups (R400/R600/R800, T400/600/800/1000/2000... you get my drift).

    M= MTB
    R= Road Race
    T= Road Touring

    The serial number on the bike will tell you exactly the year it was made. Call cannondale and they should be able to tell you.

    Touring bikes differ from road race bikes in geometry and braze ons. Basically, the touring bikes are made to attach every pannier and doodad imaginable, as well as fit wider tires and such. The Road race bikes are much tighter , and dont have all the extra braze-ons.


    Most people coming into the shop want a Race bike... even though they will never ever race the thing. They are MUCH more popular than a touring bike. The reason you got a deal is that you were probably the first person to come in the store in 4 years that would take a touring bike and happened to fit that exact bike.

    The thing about bike prices is that the R400/M400/T400 have remained pretty much the same price for years. They really cant sell it even close to 2003 price because you would just go and buy a 2003 bike. The resale for bikes... road, touring or mtb... is pitiful because new bikes have all the new stuff at the same (old) price. Its kind of like going to a car dealers lot this time of year... and they try to sell you the 2003 model year at the same price as the 2004 model year. Sure, both are new, but you usually want the 2004 model year if you are paying the same price, and you know that the 2003 will drop by 25% when you drive it off the lot! In bikes, they arent that stupid. They give steep discounts for last year's model, and steeper still if they have had the bike on the floor for a fewer years.

    About the only thing that holds any kind of value is titanium, or more exotic bikes like recumbents. The Cannondale is a great bike, certainly WAY better than your average department store bike at the same price.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: MTB to road bike

    ... And all your talk of actually riding made me just have to go out this afternoon and hit the trails. (Thanks. I needed that! [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img] )

    Sounds like you got a great deal on a great bike. I hear ya on the research thing, wanting to find out the details & all, but you've gotta admit that there's not going to be a better bike out there if this one fits you well and you want to ride it. That's what it's all about!

    Well, okay, I agree about the cantilevers. I never did like those either, mostly because they're such a nasty pain to tune, even with a 3rd-hand brake tool etc. Okay, okay, the downtube shifters are farther away than the ones that only require tipping the brake lever sideways. And you'll love going to an AheadSet type of stem if possible. Much stiffer and it doesn't require constant retightening with slippery wrenches made from stamped sheet metal. I'll stop here. I'm obviously hopeless and my wife is right about my bike-upgrade obsession. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif[/img]

    Leave the bike as it is! (In best Darth Vader voice...) You don't know the power of the upgrade!

    [edit] Well, actually, you're a flashaholic. So you undoubtably do know the power of the upgrade. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]

  7. #7
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    Default Re: MTB to road bike

    Peter,
    The power of the upgrade...yes, very familiar with that! My 1999 recumbent has a few upgrades...the only things that are still stock are the frame, handlebars, stem, seat, suspension fork and rear shock. I use MTB/touring/BMX and racing parts to make it the device I want.
    A Cannondale tourer for $200?! [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/mecry.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/faint.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img] I prefer touring bikes to road bikes, they can ply the roadways of the world for decades and hold up. Road bikes... they don't do too well when off-roading or jumping curbs. Touring bikes are a very sturdy lot with the ability to fit Cyclocross tires (knobby tires) fenders, racks, lights and anything else that floats your boat.
    If you want to make some upgrades, go with some linear pull brakes (V-brakes) make sure they come with roadie levers and not the MTB style. This mod can limit the usage of fenders though.
    If the speed bug bites, get a set of light-weight road wheels and use the touring wheels for general riding and winter use.
    Enjoy the 'Dale, for $200 you could not go wrong.

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