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Thread: Geiger counters, radiation detectors, lets see 'em

  1. #31
    Flashaholic* mattheww50's Avatar
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    Default Re: Geiger counters, radiation detectors, lets see 'em

    Tritium does NOT produce gamma radiation. Tritum Decays via Beta emission, which is simply an electron, and it is at very low energy (18kv), which is less then the energy of most of the electrons that were used in cathode ray tubes like TV sets. Most color television used something between 20 and 25Kv. Beta particles can ionize, so a Geiger counter can detect them. The problem is that at such a low energy, very few can get through the glass wall of the Geiger-Mueller tub to ionize. The mean free path of such a beta ray in air at sea level is literally a few centimeters. As a result of the very low energy emission, it can be used in a variety of applications very near living things (such as emergency exit signs in aircraft), with essentially no danger to any living thing. Essentially there is no radiation exposure because even a layer of dead cells on the surface of the skin is enough to stop almost all of the beta particles.

  2. #32
    Flashaholic* vadimax's Avatar
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    Default Re: Geiger counters, radiation detectors, lets see 'em

    Quote Originally Posted by mattheww50 View Post
    Tritium does NOT produce gamma radiation. Tritum Decays via Beta emission, which is simply an electron, and it is at very low energy (18kv), which is less then the energy of most of the electrons that were used in cathode ray tubes like TV sets. Most color television used something between 20 and 25Kv. Beta particles can ionize, so a Geiger counter can detect them. The problem is that at such a low energy, very few can get through the glass wall of the Geiger-Mueller tub to ionize. The mean free path of such a beta ray in air at sea level is literally a few centimeters. As a result of the very low energy emission, it can be used in a variety of applications very near living things (such as emergency exit signs in aircraft), with essentially no danger to any living thing. Essentially there is no radiation exposure because even a layer of dead cells on the surface of the skin is enough to stop almost all of the beta particles.
    Perhaps, you have misunderstood my post. You are absolutely right when you are talking Tritium. The video was about Chinese “Tritium” tubes that contain not Tritium, but Krypton 85 which emits beta radiation of much higher energy (it penetrates the tube glass, the polymer body of a keychain light, and needs 7 layers of 0.11 mm aluminum foil to block it entirely.

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