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Thread: XPG-R2 direct drive on 10440 lithium?

  1. #1

    Duh2 XPG-R2 direct drive on 10440 lithium?

    Hi I make some search on the forum but didn't see any thread about a direct drive xpg .
    I hope I'm in the good section.

    I want to know in anyone tried to direct drive a xpg r2 with one 10440 3.7 volt?
    Or I want a driver capable of 1.8-2.0amps with 2 10440 in serie.
    But the size will be a problem.

    Because the host is a mxdl 3watt pen.
    If needed i post picture.

    I hope you can help me guys.

    Thank you very much.

    PS:This is a de-domed xpg r2

  2. #2
    Flashaholic* AnAppleSnail's Avatar
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    Default Re: XPG-R2 direct drive on 10440 lithium?

    I have an XM-L running direct drive on an IMR chemistry 10440. Expect almost 2A current, which is unhealthy for the battery. The Peak Vesuvius I have uses a quantum-tunneling composite (QTC) as a pressure sensitive resistor. This gives the tiny light variable (finicky to adjust) brightness without the bulk of a driver.
    My biggest light-hog is my camera.

  3. #3

    Default Re: XPG-R2 direct drive on 10440 lithium?

    Thank you very much.
    But did you think the xpg burn in direct drive.
    What a QTC?

  4. #4
    Flashaholic* AnAppleSnail's Avatar
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    Default Re: XPG-R2 direct drive on 10440 lithium?

    Quote Originally Posted by ArTyOmE View Post
    Thank you very much.
    But did you think the xpg burn in direct drive.
    What a QTC?
    A QTC is a Quantum Tunneling Composite. Cut a power wire so that it is open circuit. Nothing happens. Move the ends of the wire very close together. Electrons do a funny trick because their position is not as simple as larger particles; they actually exist "somewhere close" to where we expect them, but not exactly. When the wire gets VERY close together, they start to jump across the insulating gap.

    Current crosses a non-conducting gap, in proportion to how small that gap is. This isn't very useful (Who can create a small enough gap with calipers?) until you embed conductive spike-shaped nanoparticles into rubber. The particles get closer to each other when you squeeze the rubber.

    This gives you a rubbery thing that becomes more conductive when squeezed. It also conducts in proportion to the squeezing. This allows several very small LED lights to have an extremely compact variable resistor. This allows direct-drive size lights (No room needed for a driver) with infinitely variable brightness. However, most QTC lights are a bit finicky at selecting levels, and are not perfectly consistent.
    My biggest light-hog is my camera.

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