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Thread: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

  1. #1

    Default U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    I was watching the Everest series on Amazon Prime the past few days and noticed a lot of words and sayings the British guys were using. I think one guy from New Zealand too. Some of the words sound funny because it makes sense to me now that I hear it, but just not something I would have used or even heard here in the US.

    I also went out with a friend once and he brought his friend from England. We were at a bar and I remember thinking "I know you're speaking English, but I almost don't understand you at all"

    So I'm curious, what kind of stuff do WE say in the US that you guys from the UK would never say or maybe even understand? For example, I guess "brilliant" means something like "awesome" in the US...strange it never caught on here.
    GOOD TINT!

  2. #2
    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    garbage=rubbish in uk
    jam=jelly
    chips in usa=crisps in UK as in packet of salt & vinegar ,chips in uk you have fries in usa,just UK ones are fatter and chips
    will think of more

    Even in UK depending on where you live varies,we have barm cakes/muffins/baps(like bread on a MacDonald big mac)Get funny looks if ask for a chip barm when they know it as a muffin for example.........

  3. #3

    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by ven View Post
    garbage=rubbish in uk
    jam=jelly
    chips in usa=crisps in UK as in packet of salt & vinegar ,chips in uk you have fries in usa,just UK ones are fatter and chips
    will think of more

    Even in UK depending on where you live varies,we have barm cakes/muffins/baps(like bread on a MacDonald big mac)Get funny looks if ask for a chip barm when they know it as a muffin for example.........
    LOL crisps! I love that one. Always laughed watching the show "An Idiot Abroad" when Carl said that a lot (but in general that whole damn show cracked me up the entire time)
    GOOD TINT!

  4. #4
    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Great stuff
    Superb
    nice 1
    ar kid

    aye up=how do
    laterz=see you later
    in a bit= see you again or see you later
    my ar5e=yeh right
    wicked=awesome
    kick a55=awesome

    sure more will come

    I find the "lost in translation" (figure of speech) difficult on all forums,be it UK or USA as it is down to how you interoperate what i type.

    Other countries come across as rude/ignorant but they are not,its their culture........if makes sense,i find Germans for example fall under this category..........straight to the point basically.

    Been USA couple of times,Florida,and..........well Fernando valley(will leave that working holiday there )

    At all times Americans are very friendly,very welcoming and tbh seem 1 of not the most friendliest peeps i have spent time with out of the UK.

    In short i love America,everything is just bigger and better and at times i wish my life was as here but over there..........if makes sense

  5. #5
    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Get some *phoenix nights* or *max and paddy* or *mrs browns boys* watched if possible,some great funny stuff there

  6. #6

    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by ven View Post
    At all times Americans are very friendly,very welcoming and tbh seem 1 of not the most friendliest peeps i have spent time with out of the UK.
    Well just stay off of Long Island! (uh oh, now I've done it)
    GOOD TINT!

  7. #7

    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    I've always wondered:

    Since our cookies are their biscuits, what do they call biscuits?
    Our flashlights are their torches; so what do they call torches?

    Here's an interesting link that translates some of the different uses between British English and American English vocabulary:

    http://www.englishclub.com/vocabular...h-american.htm

  8. #8
    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    [QUOTE=david57strat;4390685]I've always wondered:

    Since our cookies are their biscuits, what do they call biscuits?
    Our flashlights are their torches; so what do they call torches?



    no no no our torches our your flashlights,and are biscuits are your cookies.........we do have cookies though,tend to be choc chip and called cookies on the packet

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    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Off roading=wheeling

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    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    your trunk =our boot

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    Retired Administrator Norm's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by david57strat View Post
    I've always wondered: Since our cookies are their biscuits, what do they call biscuits?
    The closest thing to an American biscuit "as in biscuits and gravy" would be a scone but they are eaten differently.

    Some types of dumplings may be similar, as they're eaten more like biscuits. Depends on whether you go by looks or how they're eaten.

    Norm

  12. #12
    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    yorkshire puddings............mmmmmmmmmmm yum yum

    Scones with jam and clotted cream..........does that sound tasty to you guys or horrible

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    What the heck is clotted cream?!? That sounds nasty. Hahaha!

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    Flashaholic* orbital's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by nbp View Post
    What the heck is clotted cream?!? That sounds nasty. Hahaha!
    +

    I think it has something to do with horses


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    Flashaholic* dc38's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by orbital View Post
    +

    I think it has something to do with horses

    sounds more like butter....coagulated cream is butter, right?
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    Flashaholic* PapaLumen's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Fanny. It does NOT mean bottom in the UK. Aluminium, dont know what this Aluminum stuff is?

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    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by PapaLumen View Post
    Fanny. It does NOT mean bottom in the UK. Aluminium, dont know what this Aluminum stuff is?
    Alloy or aluminium is just that........... alloy as in alloy wheels
    Last edited by Norm; 03-03-2014 at 01:48 PM.

  18. #18
    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Clotted cream (sometimes called clouted cream or Cornish cream) is a thick cream made by indirectly heating full-cream cow's milk using steam or a water bath and then leaving it in shallow pans to cool slowly. During this time, the cream content rises to the surface and forms 'clots' or 'clouts'.[1] It forms an essential part of a cream tea.

    Thanks wiki

  19. #19
    Retired Administrator Norm's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by PapaLumen View Post
    Aluminium, dont know what this Aluminum stuff is?
    Aluminium follows the rules, Aluminum does not, check the other metals on the periodic table. You guys blew it big time.

    Norm

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    Flashaholic* Steve K's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Who was it that said "consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds"?

    Yeah, there's no consistency, but there are plenty of precedents for inconsistency in the English language.

    I did follow the link that you provided and clicked on the Al box on the table. The link had this text:
    "Aluminum was the original name given to the element by Humphry Davy but others called it aluminum and that became the accepted name in Europe. However, in the USA the preferred name was aluminum and when the American Chemical Society debated on the issue, in 1925, it decided to stick with aluminum."
    I think there was supposed to be an "aluminium" in there somewhere....

    And speaking of local dialects of English, I've been watching EEVblog videos and find myself scratching my head now and then, trying to figure out some of Dave Jone's Aussie phrases. If anyone hasn't seen his video blog and is a 'tronics hobbyist, you should...
    http://www.eevblog.com/

  21. #21
    Flashaholic* PapaLumen's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Bit of history on wiki. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium

    It seems Humphry Davy did indeed name it Aluminum (actually called it Alumium first). I think the "but others called it Aluminum and that became the accepted name in Europe" is referring to Aluminium and the Aluminum is a typo.

    So europeans making it harder for ourselves as usual

  22. #22
    Retired Administrator Norm's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve K View Post
    I've been watching EEVblog videos and find myself scratching my head now and then, trying to figure out some of Dave Jone's Aussie phrases. If anyone hasn't seen his video blog and is a 'tronics hobbyist, you should...
    http://www.eevblog.com/
    I'm well aware of EEVblog and Dave's accent is fairly broad, I'm guessing the excitement in his voice doesn't help, if you ever ned a tranlastion PM me with the link.

    Norm

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    Flashaholic* DUQ's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by ven View Post
    *mrs browns boys*
    I agree!

    LED's impress but Incans satisfy

  24. #24
    Flashaholic* Steve K's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by Norm View Post
    I'm well aware of EEVblog and Dave's accent is fairly broad, I'm guessing the excitement in his voice doesn't help, if you ever ned a tranlastion PM me with the link.

    Norm
    Dave's accent is fine, for me at least. It's the occasional phrase that makes me go .."huh??"... I think one of them is something like "that's a real bobby dezzler" or something like that. It makes me think of the British rhyming slang.

    Mostly, I cringe every time Dave pronounces the "L" in "solder".
    .. or says "LED" as an acronym instead of as an initialism.
    It's clearly just cultural, but I can't help myself. Is it wrong to yell "sodder, not 'solder'!!" at a laptop?

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    *Flashaholic* idleprocess's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    British English: "In hospital"
    American English: "In the hospital"
    A minor point of distinction - perhaps the American usage is to place emphasis on the seriousness of being hospitalized

    British English: Engineer
    American English: Technician
    British English: Boffin*
    American English: Scientist
    In American usage, scientists discover and advance our understanding of scientific principles, engineers develop applications of scientific principles into working technology, and technicians implement technology
    *probably more slang and the price I pay for reading The Register a good deal in the past

    British English: Lift
    American English: Elevator

    British English: Holiday
    American English: Vacation
    In America, one is likely to take a vacation during a holiday. Vacation is time off from work while holidays are dates on the calendar when everyone has time off - travel optional

    British English: Pint (a mug of beer)
    American English: Pint (16 fluid ounces)



    A few more are tip-of-the-tongue right now. Perhaps I'll fully recall them later.
    I apologize that this letter is so long; I did not have time to write a short letter

  26. #26
    Flashaholic* zespectre's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    English---->American
    Boot............Trunk
    Fag..............Cigarette
    Lorry..............Truck
    Barmy.............crazy
    Gone Spare...............Furious (having a temper tantrum)
    Bespoke....................custom made
    to Nick......................steal

    that's about all I know.
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    Flashaholic* Steve K's Avatar
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by idleprocess View Post
    British English: "In hospital"
    American English: "In the hospital"
    A minor point of distinction - perhaps the American usage is to place emphasis on the seriousness of being hospitalized
    this part mystifies me too.
    The closest analogy I can think of is the saying "We're going to church now". Technically, we are going to -the- church. I have no idea how the "the" got lost from that sentence, but it's not coming back.
    Or is it like "time to go to school'? In both cases, "church" and "school" are as much a process or event as a destination. Maybe "hospital" is the same?


    Quote Originally Posted by idleprocess View Post
    British English: Engineer
    American English: Technician
    British English: Boffin*
    American English: Scientist
    In American usage, scientists discover and advance our understanding of scientific principles, engineers develop applications of scientific principles into working technology, and technicians implement technology
    *probably more slang and the price I pay for reading The Register a good deal in the past
    My experience is that engineer has the same meaning in England as the USA. Well, at least in terms of the applied science of engineering. I'm an electrical engineer, as is fellow CPF bloke Bandgap (he writes for the U.K. EE publication Electronics Weekly).


    Quote Originally Posted by idleprocess View Post
    British English: Pint (a mug of beer)
    American English: Pint (16 fluid ounces)
    at least in England the pint glasses are marked so you know you are getting a pint. Or a half pint, which I think I got when I was killing some time in Cantebury.

    I can't recall the last time I asked for a pint here in the USA. It's just "gimme a beer".. and then "what sizes do you have?". Not a big deal.
    Even in Spanish, I got in trouble ordering beer! My Spanish is minimal, so when I tried ordering a beer... "una cerveza" in Spain, I learned that I had to specify "una canya", which was the 12 oz size beer. That's my favorite way to learn a new language!

  28. #28
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    Haha, that one sounds funny. "In hospital". That sounds like someone for whom English is a second language speaking. Why would you not use an article in that situation? Are people also "in restroom", "at store", or "eating sandwich" or are articles used in all other situations?

  29. #29
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    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    Pants, underwear
    Fanny, as mentioned earlier, is not a womans bum.
    My short time in Mildenhall showed me that English and American English can be vastly different things. My favorite memory from that trip was outside of Club Dinero when some guys rode by on bikes and I head one of them say "We'll show them what proper thugs we are." I almost fell over laughing. I had hoped that watching Snatch and Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels would have prepared me... English is a trip.

  30. #30

    Default Re: U.S. vs UK words/sayings

    The person who runs a locomotive is an engine driver, not an engineer.

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