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Thread: Tri EDC Damascus

  1. #1
    Flashaholic* gktii's Avatar
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    Default Tri EDC Damascus

    Hello everyone. Wanted to see if anyone knows, exactly how many Damascus Tri Edc's were produced? I've been searching for one of these unicorns, for close to a year, but have been unsuccessful. I know there were several of these produced, at least 6 to my knowledge, but i'm not completely positive. Does anyone have any further knowledge about these?
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  2. #2
    Light11's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    A total of 12 were made.

  3. #3
    Flashaholic* gktii's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Oh. Wow. That was more than I thought. I'm trying o acquire one and it's like searching for ice in the desert! Lol. Thx for the info. Wonder if anyone would like to be paid a premium for one? 🏼
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    I got one of the original 3 and I have the last one that Mac made just for me with some unique features after that he said it would be the last Damascus light to be produced....I call it the "buddy light"

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    Flashaholic* gktii's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Quote Originally Posted by Light11 View Post
    I got one of the original 3 and I have the last one that Mac made just for me with some unique features after that he said it would be the last Damascus light to be produced....I call it the "buddy light"
    you have 2?? haha...awesome!
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  6. #6

    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Quote Originally Posted by Light11 View Post
    I got one of the original 3 and I have the last one that Mac made just for me with some unique features after that he said it would be the last Damascus light to be produced....I call it the "buddy light"
    Cant leave us hangin...PICS somewhere?!!!!!

  7. #7
    Flashaholic* gktii's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    No pics guys? Come on. Share these unicorns with the world.
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  8. #8
    Light11's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    one of the original 3.

    WTB: Malkoff M60 MC-E and 18 mm Tritium Sphere in Green or Blue

  9. #9
    Flashaholic* gktii's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Great pic!
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    I wish I had just splashed for one of these when Mac offered up the last batch. You can always get more money, but there are only a handful of these spectacular Dam Tris.

  11. #11
    Flashaholic* gktii's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Quote Originally Posted by nbp View Post
    I wish I had just splashed for one of these when Mac offered up the last batch. You can always get more money, but there are only a handful of these spectacular Dam Tris.
    You and me both.
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  12. #12

    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Bro bump
    Please see my video product descriptions and DIY content, here.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Is it me? I think that a "Damascus" treatment on a flashlight or even a knife is wrong. "Damascus" is a fake applied finish which originally came from a noble japanese process of sword making. It took weeks to make a Samurai Damascus Sword which involved melting the steel and folding it upon itself dozens of times which naturally gave the sword this appearance and made it extremely strong. This so-called treatment on a flash light strikes me as disingenous and kitsch. With original Damascus steel, form follows function. With this Damascus flashlight, it is more like a halloween costume. Please feel free to disagree.
    Last edited by davidhunternyc; 11-15-2015 at 09:00 PM.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Ok, I disagree ...

    I don't even think Japanese swords are made of Damascus steel
    Last edited by archimedes; 11-15-2015 at 10:39 PM.
    ... is the archimedes peak

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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    *scratches head* I'm pretty sure these were made from true folded steel and the pattern is through and through, not just a "so called treatment". Many custom makers have made lights from Dam over the years actually.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Quote Originally Posted by davidhunternyc View Post
    Is it me?
    Japanese sword makers used tamahagane steel developed in Japan in the 4th Century B.C. A traditional Japanese sword is not made from Damascus steel! Damascus steel is a nickname for Wootz steel, likely originally developed in S. India 6th Century B.C. and imported by Arab traders to Damascus by the 3rd Century B.C. The steel production technique was lost at some point when trade routes were cut off, and eventually rediscovered and popularized as Damascus steel in the early 1970's at gun shows, and this reborn steel eventually made its way into the hosts of some modern torches. I am not any expert, just read wikipedia sometimes, but I am unaware of any sort of fake Damascus steel, other than distinguishing between material used in authentic Damascus blades and the modern equivalent of producing that steel. IOW, as crazy as its desire makes us, that Damascus host is surely sincerely genuine.

  17. #17
    Flashaholic* gktii's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    I've never even heard of a Damascus "finish". All the Damascus knives and lights I've ever seen, are made with folded steel either called Damascus or damasteel (both are similar but different forms of steel in the Damascus. One is carbon and the other is stainless). But no idea what or where the term "Damascus finish" came from.
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  18. #18
    *Flashaholic* Str8stroke's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Maybe he is thinking about some of the the lights that may have a Ti (or other metal) core. Then they are wrapped in a thinner, but real, Dam sleeve?? Yes it would be a cover, but it is real and ones I have seen look darn good.
    I believe Tain has used this technique before.
    Interested in Saltytri lights. Pm me!


  19. #19

    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Maybe he was referring to the pattern blasted ti lights...

  20. #20

    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Quote Originally Posted by Light11 View Post
    one of the original 3.

    Sergio, have a pic of the final one?

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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Quote Originally Posted by gktii View Post
    I've never even heard of a Damascus "finish". All the Damascus knives and lights I've ever seen, are made with folded steel either called Damascus or damasteel (both are similar but different forms of steel in the Damascus. One is carbon and the other is stainless). But no idea what or where the term "Damascus finish" came from.
    That might also refer to the fact that Damascus blades were often acid etched to bring out the typical banded pattern.
    Last edited by magellan; 02-24-2016 at 12:02 AM.
    It is better to buy a beautiful, expensive, custom flashlight than to curse the darkness.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Tri EDC Damascus

    Quote Originally Posted by night.hoodie View Post
    Japanese sword makers used tamahagane steel developed in Japan in the 4th Century B.C. A traditional Japanese sword is not made from Damascus steel! Damascus steel is a nickname for Wootz steel, likely originally developed in S. India 6th Century B.C. and imported by Arab traders to Damascus by the 3rd Century B.C. The steel production technique was lost at some point when trade routes were cut off, and eventually rediscovered and popularized as Damascus steel in the early 1970's at gun shows, and this reborn steel eventually made its way into the hosts of some modern torches. I am not any expert, just read wikipedia sometimes, but I am unaware of any sort of fake Damascus steel, other than distinguishing between material used in authentic Damascus blades and the modern equivalent of producing that steel. IOW, as crazy as its desire makes us, that Damascus host is surely sincerely genuine.
    Good information there. I'll just add what little I remember from my metallurgy text from 30 years ago. Whatever name we call it by, the samurai swords were made of two different types of steel, one harder, and one softer, hammered together, and then folded over and hammered again many times to create the many layers. This accomplished two things, the sandwiched steel blade was very flexible and hard to break, and the hammer welding process acted to express impurities like sulphur that would compromise the strength of the steel.

    The forge used to make the steel was actually invented in, and imported from, Mongolia, and although pretty good for the time, it didn't get hot enough like a modern Bessemer furnace so that the slag impurities would just float to the top where it could be skimmed off. It didn't help that the iron ore the Japanese had actually wasn't that great a quality, which was another reason for the labor intensive forging process.

    By contrast, most modern layered "Damascus" (as opposed to etched Damascus) is produced by a hydraulic two-ton trip hammer which eliminates the arduous manual forging process. They can even make stainless steel layered Damascus which wouldn't have been possible for the Japanese smiths because they couldn't have made the chromium steel, which requires a modern electric furnace, which was only invented in the 20th century and gets even hotter than the original Bessemer furnace, but more importantly allows more precise control of the melt which is necessary for producing alloy steels like stainless. (Ordinary steel just contains iron and small amounts of manganese, with the addition of carbon in the case of carbon steel).

    By the way, this layered steel wasn't just made in Japan; although their weapons are probably the most famous example of this process. It was also done in Indonesia, where examples exist of blades made from nickel iron meteorites. These are interesting in that they contain the minerals taenite and kamacite, two nickel-iron minerals which don't occur on earth.
    Last edited by magellan; 02-24-2016 at 10:32 AM.
    It is better to buy a beautiful, expensive, custom flashlight than to curse the darkness.

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