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Thread: {{ Stuff that just works }}

  1. #391
    Flashaholic* orbital's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    +

    Yes Shimano makes great components.

    Recently I sold some new & unused 'older' Shimano fishing reels & bike components on ebay for much more than I purchased them for.
    Couple of my fishing reels made quite a firestorm on ebay,, did well on that.

  2. #392

    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by markr6 View Post
    Nice! I have Tiagra on my bike. Looking to upgrade to a new bike that can run wider tires (28 maybe) and a step up to Ultegra. It's on sale but still having a hard time pulling the trigger.
    Nice. I'm looking to buy here soon and will upgrade to Ultegra also. Looking at either Litespeed or Lynskey.

  3. #393
    KITROBASKIN's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by peter yetman View Post
    I have a bit of a thing about carabiners....Black Diamond Magnetic Carabiner. The locking mechanism is controlled by two magnets which hold a latch shut.
    Yes those look nice, and love the look of Harry's harness. Peter, you're the first person I've seen using a locking carabiner on a dog leash other than us. Years ago my 50 pound Rhodesian Ridgeback mixed with a Shar-Pei saw a rabbit and ran for it. She was on a plastic coated steel cable tieout connected to my car with me nearby. When said cable ran out, the force broke the snap connected to the car. She was a tough dog and just fine, but did yelp at impact. Never did I use that kind of setup again.

    Here's a 3 minute 34 second video showing the carabiner leads and harnesses we use in public (not much at all these days). At the end is demonstrated our everynight lead choice for mountain forest evening walks where another human encountered would be rare, and twilight critter presence is expected. The dogs are loose >1/2 of the time. It is grosgrain ribbon secured with a quick release slip knot:

    https://youtu.be/7pFydGiG0Z4 YouTube chooses the opening frozen image, not me. Sorry, And yeah, Hersha is a couple days past the peak of her estrus cycle. Hank is not entire.
    Last edited by KITROBASKIN; 09-13-2020 at 03:34 PM. Reason: Random YouTube Title Image Choice Apology

  4. #394
    Flashaholic* Stoneking's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    I love carabiners and after much research Grivel is by far the best design for my needs. I’ve tried magnetic carabiners but when dirt and mud are introduced they become unreliable, in my experience.
    https://ibb.co/j3WSGDR
    https://ibb.co/DKH0zgY

    For a small keychain carabiner the DMM XSRE is, in my opinion, the best available.
    https://ibb.co/3h8sXLZ
    • 2700k 219C HDS Rotary • 3900k HDS Clicky • 4500k 219B HDS (Bare Al) Rotary •
    • 5700k (High Noon) HDS Clicky • 6200k XP-G2 Orange HDS Rotary • Ra-85-Tr •
    • UV 365nm HDS Rotary • FreLux Synergy2 • 4500k XPL RD BOSS •

  5. #395

    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    For a locking belay carabiner, I prefer the Edelrid slider lock carabiner. It's easy to lock and unlock, is lightweight, and lays flat on the side (doesn't stress the gate when loaded resting flat on a rock). For nonlocking, I usually stick with Black Diamond Neutrinos as they match colors with my Black Diamond Cams and are a decent size and pretty lightweight. Favorite belay device is the Sterling ATS. Haven't found another that can be used as a tube style, figure 8, and autoblock, can adjust friction midclimb, and can lock off midclimb.

  6. #396

    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Back scratcher? A yard stick works.

  7. #397
    *Flashaholic* Poppy's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Egg carton, as a organizer.

    When I was a kid, I was very lucky. We had two homes on one lot, and my Dad's mom and brother lived in the back house. The basement of that house had two work benches, one for my dad, and one for my uncle. They had all kinds of stuff in there that could be used to McGyver repairs. Unfortunately they didn't have a lathe, or milling machine, but my uncle could stick weld with a number of car batteries chained together. He also had gasses so that he could braise things together. Oh yeah... we flew hydrogen balloons now and then.

    He dug a hole in the back yard, and with concrete made a mold to build fiberglass boats. I think he made three of them.

    My dad had a large set of Craftsman tools/wrenches etc. and for a time in his life he was a professional mechanic. Man, did I learn a lot of stuff from him. One of the things I learned, when taking things apart that you need to keep the stuff organized so that you know how to put it back together.

    Enter... Egg carton!

    You keep the nuts and bolts together as you take them off of what ever you are working on, and put them into each of the little containers in the order in which they came out. He always had 3-4 egg cartons on a shelf near his work-bench.

    One of his mottos... "a place for everything... and everything in its place."
    "Dad, I need a pair of water pump plyers, and some WD-40"
    He'd say go to my tool box, third drawer down, you'll find the plyers with a blue handle. Then turn around, take two steps to the left, and reach out at shoulder level, and one foot above your hand, look for the WD40 on the shelf.

    It's funny how that stuff rubs off. I now find myself giving similar instructions to my daughter or grandkids.

    I'm in the process of getting my snow blower running and ready for winter. Squirrels chewed my fuel line, and I had to take a lot of stuff apart to get to it.
    I used an egg carton to hold all the bolts and screws as I dismantled it. LOL... just like my dad taught me. Damn... I am getting more like my old man every day.

    LOL... that used to be a curse.
    My Grand Kids call me Poppy

  8. #398
    *Flashaholic* Chauncey Gardiner's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Thanks for the fun read, Poppy.
    Sometimes I wonder if I've purchased my last flashlight.

  9. #399

    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    A good, modern, full-tang hatchet.
    I do like traditional tools. And the vast majority are far better quality than modern-day examples. But hatches seem to be the exception to that rule. No more broken handles with the head possibly flying off towards someone. No more uneven grind lines.
    "The World is insane. With tiny spots of sanity, here and there... Not the other way around!" - John Cleese.

  10. #400
    *Flashaholic* Poppy's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by Chauncey Gardiner View Post
    Thanks for the fun read, Poppy.
    Chauncey,
    I'm glad you enjoyed the story.

    I continued to get my snow blower ready for service. After I replaced the fuel line, and cap, she wouldn't start.
    Assuming that the carb got gummed up, I dropped the bowl, and sprayed it up good with gumout. The float was stuck, so I freed that up too.

    It still wouldn't start, not even on ether, or gumout.
    Checked... no spark. Swapped out the plug, and then the magneto.
    Unfortunately I got a bad part, and I wasted a good amount of time because my multimeter was left in my son's tool box, when he took it to his house, and I couldn't test the coil of the new magneto.

    SO... I swapped in another magneto, and it'll run on ether, or gumout, but not from fuel from the tank.

    For $14 I ordered a new carburetor, there are only a half a dozen screws/bolts to swap it out.

    Well.. they are all frozen in place.

    Enter the tool that just works, The Hand-held impact hammer!



    I ended up pulling the intake manifold with the carb attached, and resetting the float height adjustment. I must have bent it when I freed it up initially.

    So now I have a spare carburetor.

    I added a fuel shut off valve that came with the carb kit. Now I can shut off the gas, and run the carb dry for winter/summer storage.
    Last edited by Poppy; 09-26-2020 at 06:04 AM.
    My Grand Kids call me Poppy

  11. #401
    Flashaholic* orbital's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by Poppy View Post
    .

    The Hand-held impact hammer!
    +

    Poppy, another super post!
    that impact hammer is exactly the type of thing you spot at a garage sale.
    slowly pick it up, walk over to the owner & quietly ask "what do you want for it"


    Whatever dollar you pay, because they don't make stout stuff like that any more,, new stuff would simply fall apart.

  12. #402

    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Craftsman made a good one a few years back. I bought one to use on stuck lug nuts and such for taking wheels off junkyard cars perched up on cinder blocks where using a lug wrench could topple the car off its perch.
    John 3:16

  13. #403
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    So how do they work, if you don't mind me asking? I had an automated centre punch that you pushed down hard and it clunked and made its mark Does the impact hammer work like that and just shatter the rust bond?
    P
    "O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!" He chortled in his joy.

  14. #404

    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    It twists when you hit it with a hammer. Not much good if it aint lefty loosey, but perhaps just breaking the bond is good no matter which way the threads go.
    Tried looking up a schematic but google thinks I'm looking for reflective paint…… so never mind
    John 3:16

  15. #405
    *Flashaholic* Poppy's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Good morning Peter,
    It can be used on left handed and right handed threads.

    To use it, you put on the correct size attachment, whether it be a flat head, or phillips head screw driver, or 1/2 inch drive socket.
    Then twist the body of the impact wrench in the direction that you want it to go. There is a heavy spring resistance, and it locks in place.

    I imagine that internally, there is a twisted ramp, and that if you compress the outer portion of the body, it will turn perhaps a 1/16th of an inch in the direction that you set it to.

    In use, it applies torque in the direction that you want it to, when you strike it, and there is the added benefit of vibration. And in the case of a phillips or flat head screw, the driver is less likely to slip and strip the head than if just light pressure is held against the head by hand.

    If you look at my picture you can see where I have held the outside with water-pump/channel lock plyers while I beat the crap out of the tool with a hammer.

    Here is a link to its 1965 patent, with a longer description than I care to read.
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US3366187A/en

    And an internal diagram.
    https://patentimages.storage.googlea...ngs-page-1.png
    Last edited by Poppy; 09-28-2020 at 02:54 AM.
    My Grand Kids call me Poppy

  16. #406
    Flashaholic* orbital's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by peter yetman View Post
    So how do they work, if you don't mind me asking? I had an automated centre punch that you pushed down hard and it clunked and made its mark Does the impact hammer work like that and just shatter the rust bond?
    P
    +

    It's very focused, downward energy motion to break rust bond.
    You might say, just use an electric impact hammer, well there are spaces or situations that's not possible or ideal.
    Also you just might want a more 'hand touch' on what you're doing.

    Like anything else, prep work can be equally important;; some wd-40 or blaster/lube, let sit overnight, then maybe heat if possible.

    focused energy motion

  17. #407
    *Flashaholic* Poppy's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by orbital View Post
    +

    It's very focused, downward energy motion to break rust bond.
    You might say, just use an electric impact hammer, well there are spaces or situations that's not possible or ideal.
    Also you just might want a more 'hand touch' on what you're doing.

    Like anything else, prep work can be equally important;; some wd-40 or blaster/lube, let sit overnight, then maybe heat if possible.

    focused energy motion
    Absolutely! Prep work with WD-40 for overnight if possible.

    A little heat? Can you pick out the fire-wrench in this picture?
    It's been around the block a few times, but still works like a charm.

    My Dad actually suggested using a soldering iron for heat. I never thought of that.

    My Grand Kids call me Poppy

  18. #408
    *Flashaholic* Chauncey Gardiner's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    That dude Poppy, he LOOOOVES to solder!
    Sometimes I wonder if I've purchased my last flashlight.

  19. #409
    Flashaholic* orbital's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    +

    Had a specific customization to do; needed to drill hole & tap threads, plus a few other things.
    couldn't find my tap wrench (which was a cheaper one anyway) so I decided just to get a new one.
    now I don't need to buy the best tools, since Craftsman isn't the same anymore, I really just go for value.

    Anyway, wanted to get a nice tap wrench for this project, so ordered up a Starrett 93B ,,
    all I can say is what a treat to use such a beautiful tool, so simple yet perfect in execution.

    ..did I need a $33 tap wrench, no, but this one I will not misplace~ever

    ______

    my custom part came out great!, used my drill press, bench vise, bench grinder, Starrett & a bit of paint.
    (btw:: this custom part is inexplicably rare, just may look to see if it's already registered/Patented)





  20. #410
    Flashaholic ironhorse's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    I've used cheap tap wrenches and quality tap wrenches. You wouldn't think it would make much of a difference, but it sure does.
    I choose to carry a flashlight because I am often kept in the dark.

  21. #411
    *Flashaholic* Poppy's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by orbital View Post
    +

    Had a specific customization to do; needed to drill hole & tap threads, plus a few other things.
    couldn't find my tap wrench (which was a cheaper one anyway) so I decided just to get a new one.
    now I don't need to buy the best tools, since Craftsman isn't the same anymore, I really just go for value.

    Anyway, wanted to get a nice tap wrench for this project, so ordered up a Starrett 93B ,,
    all I can say is what a treat to use such a beautiful tool, so simple yet perfect in execution.

    ..did I need a $33 tap wrench, no, but this one I will not misplace~ever

    ______

    my custom part came out great!, used my drill press, bench vise, bench grinder, Starrett & a bit of paint.
    (btw:: this custom part is inexplicably rare, just may look to see if it's already registered/Patented)


    Wow!!! You used ALL the TOOLS!!!

    What a great day at the work-bench

    Back in the late sixties, I bought a tap and die set out of some guys trunk. They were really cheap, to buy and they were made in Japan, when "Made in Japan" meant Jap crap. I may not have used them a dozen times in the last 50 years, but they are handy to have. Some of taps have flattened out, and others have snapped. I probably spent more for the replacement wrench than I paid for the whole set. So that I don't lose the wrench, I zip tied it to the handle of the set (it won't fit inside the box).
    My Grand Kids call me Poppy

  22. #412
    *Flashaholic* Poppy's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Need I say more?

    My Grand Kids call me Poppy

  23. #413

    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Yeah that starter fluid. Never needed it for so many years until I bought a cheap-ish Ryobi trimmer. Once it starts getting cold at night (I leave it in the shed) startup get iffy. But the tiniest spray and it fires right up...and boy does it!
    GOOD TINT!

  24. #414

    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by bykfixer View Post
    When I wear my Shimano baseball cap half the comments are thumbs up by fishermen. The other half by bicycle riders.

    My oldest multi speed bikes have Shimano derailuers. They just work. I like their thumb shifters too.

    I like their bicycle stuff much more than their fishing reels. Penn for me (I have plenty of both).

  25. #415
    *Flashaholic* Poppy's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by markr6 View Post
    Yeah that starter fluid. Never needed it for so many years until I bought a cheap-ish Ryobi trimmer. Once it starts getting cold at night (I leave it in the shed) startup get iffy. But the tiniest spray and it fires right up...and boy does it!
    I guess in part because it is already aerosolized, and I guess it is more flammable than gasoline, that if it won't start on ether, you might need to check your spark, and then compression.

    We always had a can or two in our tool box for our boats.
    It was fairly common that we would have water in our fuel. We'd have to drop the carburetor bowl, toss the water, and then give her a shot or two of ether to get her started.
    My Grand Kids call me Poppy

  26. #416
    Flashaholic* orbital's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    +

    Basic leather work gloves, inexpensive unlined ones.
    Not sure how many I'v gone through over the years, but they are indispensable.

  27. #417
    *Flashaholic* Lynx_Arc's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    +1 on the leather and other cheap gloves as they save you from cuts and scrapes and when working on some thing save a lot of time on cleanup getting dirt and grease out from under the fingernails etc. Definitely recommended for trimming holly bushes.
    Fenix Split rings 1400+ sent, SWIVELS now available also!
    Psalm 112:4 Light shines in the darkness for the godly. They are generous, compassionate, and righteous.

  28. #418
    *Flashaholic* PhotonWrangler's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Regular old drugstore alcohol. Not only does it disinfect things, it turns "permanent" marker ink into butter instantly for a quick clean-up or mistake correction.

  29. #419
    *Flashaholic* Poppy's Avatar
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    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Oh yeah... a big plus on work gloves!

    I like the soft leather ones.

    I also like the ones you can pick up at the Home Depot about $5 for a 5 pack of nitrile dipped cotton gloves. They are good for gardening (so your hands don't get wet) and I use them when working on my car. They are cheap enough that when they get greasy you can toss them. Although I have wiped them off on an oily rag to be used another day.

    Since the back half is cotton, or maybe a poly blend, my hands don't sweat as much as they do if I were to wear nitrile gloves.
    My Grand Kids call me Poppy

  30. #420

    Default Re: {{ Stuff that just works }}

    Quote Originally Posted by scout24 View Post
    1. Leatherman Sideclip. I NEED pocketclips, can't stand loose items in the bottom of my pockets, and can't really do belt sheaths day in day out. Probably my most used multitool. I had two, my son lost one, a member here found one for me in a hardware store in England and was kind enough to purchase and ship it to me. That is still new in box, while my original backup now gets used pretty hard.

    2. 4WR Vise Grip pliers. Look just like regular, but 4" long. Tiny but incredibly useful. I had wanted a Leatherman Crunch (Theme here?) but they were pretty expensive for what they are in my opinion. These 4WR's are light, locking, fairly cheap, easy to pack, and make great pot handles when cooking. Also nice to have a second pair of pliers for gear repair , etc. in the woods. Makes a great bit holder for the Leatherman bits, or others for that matter. I've got four or five of these scattered in bags, cars, trucks, etc. Pics side by side forthcoming.
    EDIT- Pics.







    3. Zebralight SC62w. Ordered one, used it for one night when it showed up, have a second put aside in case the first one goes bad. I like it that much.
    I’ve never found a suitable replacement for the leatherman side clip I wish there was something similar


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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