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Thread: Eagtac DX3B MKII

  1. #1
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    Default Eagtac DX3B MKII

    I am starting to get interested in the Eagtac DX3B MKII. I did a search here hoping to find a review, but I didn't find one. Does anybody here have one and, if so, how do you like it?

  2. #2

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    Default Re: Eagtac DX3B MKII

    I donít have the DX3B MKII, but have the DX3B, which has the same U/I, so a couple of thoughts. Like a lot of newer tactical lights that try to offer multiple modes, it is really a single mode flashlight for one hand use with the tail cap. That mode can be preprogrammed to either high or the next highest setting. If you want the flashlight to come on in any other mode, it requires two hand operation because you have to hold the side switch while activating the tail switch. For some, that may be beneficial if they want a multiple mode light with an absolute guarantee they can get high every time one handed and whichever mode they desire two handed at startup. Also, to cycle through the other modes, you have to use the side switch, while you still need to access the tail switch to turn the light off. For me, the one hand, two hand U/I didnít work. I prefer the DX3B Mini Pro, which is side switch only, so single hand only needed to operate the light. Of course, the Mini Pro offers the XHP-50, not the XHP-70, which may or may not suit your purpose.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Eagtac DX3B MKII

    I have a few different Clickies (five). The UI and tail switch are different on many of them.

    I would first determine how you plan on using the light, what are priorities for you, and what beam pattern you want. I use the Eagtac website to get a better idea of what I should expect: http://www.eagtac.com/html/d_series/index.html

    The beam patterns are sometimes listed further down the page. IMO, always check the "Technical Specifications" link/tab in the upper right side, as sometimes the beam patterns are in there instead of the main page, and the UI, modes changing, etc. are usually listed there.

    Also, you might want to make sure you have good communication with the seller if you want a specific variant of your model (specific LED). Amazon listings sometimes use the specs and LED name of a different variant than the one they are selling. I would order directly from a vetted dealer if possible.

  4. #4
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    Default Eagtac DX3B MKII

    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty321 View Post

    I would first determine how you plan on using the light, what are priorities for you, and what beam pattern you want...
    I plan to use it clipped to my cap while I am horseback riding at night.

    However, I have no idea what beam pattern I want for that.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Eagtac DX3B MKII

    Beam will depend on how fast will you be riding horse?

    Will you run into tule fog at night?

    What if your hat falls off, or gets rubbed off on a tree limb?

    I would look at a headlamp with a floody beam.. and carry a backup light w/clip for that throws well just in case..

    ..in my opnion

  6. #6

    Default Re: Eagtac DX3B MKII

    Quote Originally Posted by JAS View Post
    I plan to use it clipped to my cap while I am horseback riding at night.

    However, I have no idea what beam pattern I want for that.
    I've only ridden a couple times. I would suggest something that was meant for a little distance (since you might be at speed), but I don't know how a horse would respond to a hotspot whipping around, especially if it was small. I also wouldn't trust any flashlight clipped to a hat while in a trot. I also don't know if the brightness (for distance) would last very long with an 18350 or single CR123.

    I, too, might suggest looking into a headlamp that is secure, has a wide enough beam to see obstacles, holes, buildings?, etc. without having to whip a small hostspot on. Usually floody lights will need a bit more power and juice to get good distance. I might suggest something like the Nitecore HU60 with a belt mounted battery. It has an adjustable beam profile, long lasting battery bank options, and has a remote you can put on your wrist if you don't want to take your hands far off the reins.

  7. #7
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    Default Eagtac DX3B MKII

    Quote Originally Posted by knucklegary View Post
    Beam will depend on how fast will you be riding horse?

    Will you run into tule fog at night?

    What if your hat falls off, or gets rubbed off on a tree limb?

    I would look at a headlamp with a floody beam.. and carry a backup light w/clip for that throws well just in case..

    ..in my opinion

    The average speed for a horse to walk at is around four miles per hour.

    Fog does happen, but I have ridden at night, in the past, where it is typically patchy ground for.

    If my cap falls off, I will stop and pick it up, of course.

    I do have a Nightcore headlamp. It is mounted to my equestrian helmet. I just don't wear my helmet all that often, though.

    I do carry a Klarus XT12GT in my cargo pocket as a backup.


    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty321 View Post
    I've only ridden a couple times. I would suggest something that was meant for a little distance (since you might be at speed), but I don't know how a horse would respond to a hotspot whipping around, especially if it was small. I also wouldn't trust any flashlight clipped to a hat while in a trot. I also don't know if the brightness (for distance) would last very long with an 18350 or single CR123.

    I, too, might suggest looking into a headlamp that is secure, has a wide enough beam to see obstacles, holes, buildings?, etc. without having to whip a small hostspot on. Usually floody lights will need a bit more power and juice to get good distance. I might suggest something like the Nitecore HU60 with a belt mounted battery. It has an adjustable beam profile, long lasting battery bank options, and has a remote you can put on your wrist if you don't want to take your hands far off the reins.
    I typically walk my horse when I am riding at night. I rarely trot or canter. If I do, it is for pretty short periods of time. I probably should consider a floody light. Reading specs on-line doesn't really help me determine which is more floody, though.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Eagtac DX3B MKII

    The way I get an idea of how floody the light is by just the specs (assuming they are accurate), is divide the candela by lumens (cd/lumens). IIRC, the floody i4000R is like a 3, while the spotlights are usually 15+. IMO, a nice mix with more flood but a little bit of distance will be in the 6-9 range.

    Edit: I should mention, that from the ongoing discussion in this thread, it sounds like the ET you were originally asking about should fit the bill (no pun intended). Just be aware that you might not want to use it at it's highest setting if you plan to use it for longer periods of time.

    Another tip, if you don't want the lanyard ring, the loop that you run the lanyard through is a hinge. If you look closely at the opposite side of that piece, there will see a separation in the plastic. You can open the lanyard ring from there and take it off.
    Last edited by Scotty321; 04-26-2021 at 01:35 AM.

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