Can I say Goodbye to my flashlight?

cimerio

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Hello, I have a Fenix FD20, that stopped working some days ago.
No defined motive. I wonder if its is because the batteries leaked.

I attached some pictures of head (is that the right word).

Some idea?
 

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jon_slider

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> Can I say Goodbye to my flashlight?

yes, if the driver is dead because of a short circuit, caused by the corrosion bridging some electrical contacts

your photos are very helpful, they show battery residue bridging some of the rings in the bottom of the head.

You could clean that area, suggest using alcohol. Point head glass UP, so alcohol does not go inside the reflector.. but even after you clean the corrosion on the outside, if the light still does not work, it is probably because the driver is dead.

you may want to go deeper, and disassemble the head.. and clean out the corrosion inside, also.. but honestly, I do not expect your light to revive.. you might just enjoy taking it apart to see what it looks like.

sorry for your loss..
for future, you now know that AA batteries can leak and destroy the light..

consider it an opportunity to buy something else..
 
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sween1911

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Welcome Cimerio!

That's a tough one. I echo Jon's comments, you can try cleaning it with alcohol. At this point, it's a learning experience.

I've held many a dead flashlight in my hands done in by alkalines (alka-LEAKS) over the years.

For your next light, you're all the wiser the next time around! If you're going to use AA primaries (we refer to non-rechargeables as "primary" batteries, meaning disposable regular batteries that regular people refer to as batteries), we recommend Energizer Lithium batteries. They don't leak like alkalines and they last a long time.
 

jon_slider

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I no longer use Disposable Batteries of any kind

Though I agree the Ultimate Lithium are very durable, they are also very expensive. And I hate having to avoid using a light for fear of draining the battery and it not being Full the next time I use it.

In my AA lights, I use Rechargeable: NiMh Eneloop. They work just as well as Ultimate Lithium, even stored in my car through 20F freezing winters and 90F hot summers.
 

jon_slider

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Fenix FD20 is
Discontinued

a similar 2X AA with a better LED could be a Convoy T4
though it is not adjustable focus

here is a review
also available in Titanium

btw, it does not like Ultimate Lithium, it works w Eneloop or 14500
 

Derek Dean

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First of all, cimerio, welcome to the forum : )

Another thing you might try, if cleaning with alcohol doesn't work (and again, make sure you always keep the head pointed UP, as in the LED facing UP, you don't want liquid getting down in the head), is to try using baking soda mixed with a bit of warm water, mixed so that it's a bit looser than a paste, but not watery.

This mixture is VERY good at neutralizing battery corrosion, then follow up with the alcohol cleaning again. I've saved many of my friend's Maglites that had batteries so corroded that we had to drill them out first.

And finally, just to echo the others, use this as a learning experience to NOT use alkaline batteries in your lights.

Anyway, good luck, and let us know how it turns out : )
 

Stefano

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is to try using baking soda mixed with a bit of warm water, mixed so that it's a bit looser than a paste, but not watery.

This mixture is VERY good at neutralizing battery corrosion, then follow up with the alcohol cleaning again. I've saved many of my friend's Maglites that had batteries so corroded that we had to drill them out first.
It would be nice if he could save his flashlight
 

cimerio

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Hello, thank you for the tips.
I promise comments about the situation but for now I would like to share more pics.
I don't know how to disassemble the posterior side, though. apparently, didn't leak there
 

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Stefano

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There are those who also use vinegar to clean from battery residues.
I'm thinking they suggested baking soda above.
For the uninitiated, vinegar and bicarbonate together are a very powerful mixture (when mixed they immediately form a foam) that is used for household cleaning without using chemicals (also removes hard encrustation from pans)

What do you think, it could also be used here?
(in this case leave to act for a few hours.)
Vinegar can ruin the rubber parts a little (dry them) better after this replace the rubber rings.
 

cimerio

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Hello, friends.
Unfortunately, no cigar.
Probably, the driver is dead.
I feell sad. Good flashlights are hard to find in South America. And the exchange doesn't help: 1 U$ = 5 R$
Now I know why each manual guides to never leave the batteries inside the product when not used.
Anyway I will try to use only rechargeable batteries and adquire something else.
This topic have some good recomendations
 

jabe1

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Did you try eliminating the switch as the bad component? There is a thread on troubleshooting which can help you in your diagnosis.
 

cimerio

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brazil
Did you try eliminating the switch as the bad component? There is a thread on troubleshooting which can help you in your diagnosis.
Yes, the switch is ok. Honestly, I did see that coming. The flashlight was weaking, until die. Probably, the leaks was damaging the circuit.
 

Lynx_Arc

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Once you get alkaspewage inside a device onto the electronics you have to get to the damage and clean it up as corrosion can short out the circuitry even damage traces and components. I would hope the batteries used have a warranty on them that you could contact them for damages and get enough to replace the light. It is because of alkaleaks I went to nimh and because of the discharge rate of nimh I went to LSD nimh (eneloops,hybrids) and because of damage to nimh cells overdischarging in multi cell lights I went to lithium ion and because of 18650 runtime/performance I only use nimh in a keychain light for the time being.
I've recently had a 2025 duracell alkaline leak in a cheap light that still measured 1.5+v that I threw away. I replaced it with a rayovac AA etc. it is not worth the hassle of dealing with battery companies for a $5 light to me but a $50+ dollar light going cheap on the batteries is a waste of the money spent on the light might as well buy a $10 light if you are going to use alkaleaks and toss it when they spew.
 
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