decent 75 dolar sharpener!

nbp

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If you just need to sharpen blades and want something that takes off very little metal at a time so it's hard to ruin anything, the Spyderco Sharpmaker is great. But if you need to reprofile blades, it will take you ages and it's probably not the kit for you.
 

raggie33

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If you just need to sharpen blades and want something that takes off very little metal at a time so it's hard to ruin anything, the Spyderco Sharpmaker is great. But if you need to reprofile blades, it will take you ages and it's probably not the kit for you.
i think i had the sharp maker . it did not do anything to my knifes. but it may of been user error
 

ChrisGarrett

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I've used the Lansky Deluxe set for a good 25 years and for <$45, it's been pretty good. Longer blades are more problematic, but doable and if you add their medium diamond hone, you've got most sharpening and reprofiling chores covered.

There are no doubt better systems out there, but not for under $50.

Chris
 

xxo

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I use the sharpmaker - works great for maintaining a good edge but can be slow if you need to reprofile. Spyderco has a old video where Sal shows how to use it. If you need to reprofile a xtra coarse stone or diamond hone is faster. The work sharp takes off way too much metal and can grind off the point of your knife before you know it, not a good sharpener if you have a decent knife that you don't want to damage.
 

Sos24

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I've had a DMT sharpening kit with aligner for about 20yrs and it has worked well. It works similar to the Lansky and comes with diamond stones.
 

raggie33

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so i tryied my cheap whetstone again instead of useing it as if im trying to cut off a thin slice of the stone i draged knife the other way and i got it to at least shaving sharp
 

raggie33

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im so glad i waited and tryied the whetstone again it got my 7 dollar pocket knife scary sharp
 

StagMoose

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Nice work! It takes some time and practice. Stones really are the best way to learn to sharpen IMO. I have tried a bunch of the jig systems and while they will help and give predictable results, nothing beats knowing how to free hand it.

For pocket knives if you want something simple that will quickly sharpen a knife the work sharp guided field sharpener is something that is useful. It gives you a couple grits, ceramic stone and strop all in a small package with guides. It is limited in size of knife you will want to sharpen and only produces a single kind of edge, but for pocketknives it is helpful if you are learning to free hand.
 

raggie33

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Nice work! It takes some time and practice. Stones really are the best way to learn to sharpen IMO. I have tried a bunch of the jig systems and while they will help and give predictable results, nothing beats knowing how to free hand it.

For pocket knives if you want something simple that will quickly sharpen a knife the work sharp guided field sharpener is something that is useful. It gives you a couple grits, ceramic stone and strop all in a small package with guides. It is limited in size of knife you will want to sharpen and only produces a single kind of edge, but for pocketknives it is helpful if you are learning to free hand.

cool i was looking at that sharpner
 

Modernflame

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One of my goals is to become a professional knife sharpener, so I have them all. Well, at least most of them. Bench stones, DMT diamond plates, Spyderco Sharpmaker, KME, Wicked Edge Gen 3, Tormek T8, strops, ceramic rods, etc. They all have strengths and weaknesses. If your goal is to keep your own pocket knives sharp, then the lansky will serve you well. The KME might change your definition of scary sharp, but this is outside of your stated budget. Whether you get the lansky or stick with your bench stones, I would recommend getting a good, two sided leather strop with sub micron diamond pastes. If used properly, this will greatly increase your sharpness.
 

LGT

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I second the Work Sharp. The bench stone with tri-brasive is the best sharpener I've ever used, and I've tried many. Easy to use and the ceramic rod puts a nice finish. I would also recommend a quality leather strop as the final step. Good luck with your choice.
 

turbodog

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Work Sharp is great on modern hard steels.

I use a bench belt sander with leather belt with 'white' compound on the belt. It makes up in 'elbow grease' what it lacks elsewhere. Can get blades ridiculously sharp. But this is only for when I want the super sharp blade.

I use some old (30 years) diamond water stones for normal day to day, still shaving sharp. Quick sharpening. Uses water, not oil, so no mess. LONG lasting.

https://www.amazon.com/DMT-W6EFC-6-Inch-Diamond-Whetstone/dp/B003NCVFC4
 

raggie33

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haveing trouble geting pysh thru papper test. you know where you dont use a sliceing action you just let the blade fall thru paper my knife just wont do that. it slices fine
 

Modernflame

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haveing trouble geting pysh thru papper test. you know where you dont use a sliceing action you just let the blade fall thru paper my knife just wont do that. it slices fine

If your knife won't push cut through paper after sharpening, then I suspect one or more of these culprits.


1) Slack in the Lansky angle guide. If you hold the jig in your left hand, use your left index finger to press the guide rod into either the top or the bottom of the slot. Doesn't matter which way you press it as long as you are consistent.


2) Forming a burr with the low grit stone. You will know that you've hit the apex when you draw a burr across the full length of the blade. Don't move up in grit until this has been accomplished.


3) Deburring. AUS-8 steel is easy to sharpen but can be a challenge to deburr. It's possible that you have a small burr or burr root covering the apex. The last step with each stone should be to make gentle, low pressure passes into the blade on each side. Repeat this several times with decreasing pressure. This is especially important after your finest grit.


4) Stropping. Leather strops are soft, pliable material that will flex under pressure. It's important to strop at a slightly lower angle than the sharpening angle and to use only light pressure. Otherwise, the leather will wrap around the edge and round off the apex. This can happen quickly. If done correctly, the strop will clean the apex of any remaining burr.
 
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