emergencies comms

Flashlightmaster2021

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I might have already made a post like this before . But its good to get your ham license and atleast have a few UV5RS AND Garmin in reach mini sate litte text messanger in your EDC. Coms kit
 

hamhanded

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At least get a GMRS license, it covers your immediate family too, and no testing.
 
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letschat7

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Well it still takes a bit of knowledge to buy the right kit and set it up. You can't run an Icom by just turning it on. Like it works better at night than during the day and power level matters to. You are probably better off buying a Shortwave and calling it a day.
 

alpg88

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The Ham community are snobs in my area and that was before I was on the TWL.
They seem to be like that everywhere, try to take a license test, you'll be lucky if you get 1 guy who is not, they seem to think way too highly of themselves, like an exclusive elite club. sad hams,. lol. However as per FCC you do not need a license to own one, and to listen, and in case of emergency it is not against fcc rules to transmit either.
 

hamhanded

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More valid reasons why amatuer radio is a poor choice for emergency comms.
And rubbing sticks together over dry leaves is a poor choice for emergency fire starting, but it is one of the last options before you simply go without.

Realistically, nobody expects to choose either if they have a better option, but both require practice to be useful fallback.
 
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alpg88

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Passing a ham license exam does not in any way teaches you how to operate a specific radio unit, to learn how to use a specific radio no license of any kind or tests are needed.
there is absoletely nothing wrong with uv5r, it is good enough for frontlines in Ukraine. sounds like we have a sad ham here.
 
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DRW

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Don't forget CB for some semblance of license free HF. It still has its place and now FM can legally be used on it.
I have one in my F350. There's less traffic than the ham repeaters. Considerably more traffic on GMRS, compared to CB & amatuer. I travel a lot in MI, IL, WI, IN, OH.

That's really the problem, sending your help request out on a freq that someone might hear is a shot in the dark.
 

scout24

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Best to have as many bases covered as possible, if it's a major concern. Ham, GMRS, CB, etc. It's worth the HAM technician license and finding a local club in my opinion. (I have my General ticket, for access to the HF bands but use VHF 99%of the time.) I have had nothing but encouraging encounters with local clubs. Our ARES group (google it.) has members who just have 5 watt handheld radios, and they are as valuable members as anyone else. Get a couple UV5R's, or a lower end Yaesu handheld for under $100, an external antenna and cable, and learn how to use your equipment. Club nets are a great place to learn common frequencies and repeaters in your area, and you'll have common ground with local members.
 

RWT1405

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Cellphone, GMRS, Garmin inReach for non-specific emergency scenarios.

What kind of emergency and where will you be?

There is nothing KISS in amatuer radio.

73 K8HIT

Ok, fair enough, for EVERYDAY emergencies, I will agree with you, to a point (I have experienced cell phone use limited/impossible during some "everyday emergencies", more then a few times)

I guess, due to my background, when people are talking "emergency comms and amateur radios (HAM)" I am thinking MAJOR EMERGENCIES such as Hurricanes, etc.

If you've ever responded to such areas, you know that cell phone use can/will be difficult, if not impossible

But again, fair enough, as I didn't make clear what I was thinking about
 

DRW

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If you've ever responded to such areas, you know that cell phone use can/will be difficult, if not impossible
Former Police Sergeant and current Member of a Nuclear Emergency Response team, I have an idea on what constitutes emergency coms for some situations.
 

RWT1405

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Former Police Sergeant and current Member of a Nuclear Emergency Response team, I have an idea on what constitutes emergency coms for some situations.

Then I would hope you understand what I was saying

I have responded to a few Hurricanes, etc. as a member of "task forces" over the years

If you have responded to any MAJOR such emergency over the years, you know exactly why cell phones likely will not be your best choice

I've been in EMS and Fire since 1979

Career Paramedic since 1985

I've been involved in more than a few emergency situations over the last 40+ years
 

hamhanded

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Not every emergency comms scenario is an individual separated from support in immediate need of assistance from strangers. In my case I have family within RF range of some services (CB) and not others (GMRS), but outside of reasonable walking distance. If an earthquake struck my area and cell phones are down, I'd only be trying to raise them on the radio to make sure they're ok. In which case, deserted CB channels would be a huge benefit to me.

These are just tools, nothing more. Not everything is a nail, but not every use case is the same.
 
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