Fuel Lantern

Basscrazy

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Oct 16, 2019
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Hi all I'm looking for a fuel lantern but safe to use indoor I've looked at YouTube as you do but reviews are all same generic no light ones. I'm looking for a bright one I have multiple led ones as I do survival trips but I love old skool type
 

filibuster

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Dec 27, 2005
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205
Hi all I'm looking for a fuel lantern but safe to use indoor I've looked at YouTube as you do but reviews are all same generic no light ones. I'm looking for a bright one I have multiple led ones as I do survival trips but I love old skool type
The fuel based pressure/pump type lamps (petromax, coleman) are the brightest you will find but they are noisy and may not burn as clean as needed for indoor use.

The brightest wick/mantel lanterns for indoors would be the Aladdin oil lamps. Look at Lehmans.com for examples.
 

Dascombe

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Jan 26, 2015
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I don't know if you'll find too many fuel lanterns listed as being "safe" for indoor use. Most will come with dozens of safety warnings stating that they should never be used indoors. That said, I've used my Coleman fuel based lanterns indoors from time-to-time and although I've never had an issue, they are a bit stinky even when running properly. Whatever you do, get a Carbon-Monoxide sensor.

Despite my love of Coleman gas lanterns, my favorite lantern is a now my Coleman Elite Pro dual-mantle propane lantern in red: super bright, piezo igniter, no smell, and won't even register a blip on a CO meter after hours of use. No pumping and no spilling gas. Even looks pretty nice for a propane light.
 

Kestrel

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I've had a lot of good times with my Coleman single-mantle 'Backpacker' - which reminds me, I should probably try to find a few spare mantles (they are of a smaller size) if they haven't already gone the way of Kodak film; but now that I've been using propane for cooking - car camping, I just can't imagine going back to pumping, spilling etc as well.
 

Dascombe

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I've had a lot of good times with my Coleman single-mantle 'Backpacker' - which reminds me, I should probably try to find a few spare mantles (they are of a smaller size) if they haven't already gone the way of Kodak film.

Look into Peerless mantles to see if they make one compatible with your light. They're a fair bit brighter than the Coleman ones as they're still made using Thorium.
 

turbodog

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I've had a lot of good times with my Coleman single-mantle 'Backpacker' - which reminds me, I should probably try to find a few spare mantles (they are of a smaller size) if they haven't already gone the way of Kodak film; but now that I've been using propane for cooking - car camping, I just can't imagine going back to pumping, spilling etc as well.

I had one of those. Didn't use it for a while and _all_ the seals dried out.
 

desmobob

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Sep 9, 2013
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324
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Upstate NY - Lake George region
I have a collection of Coleman lanterns ranging from the 1920s through 2015. Even the oldest ones can be very easily serviced to work perfectly again. Usually, just oiling the leather pump gasket and replacing the cap gasket will do the job.

This is a 1926 LZ-327 working like new...

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The little backpacking model is the one of mine that I got the most use out of.
 
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Hooked on Fenix

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Dec 13, 2007
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Try a butane backpacking lantern. They burn cleaner than propane. I use mine in a tent for warmth in the cold. Just make sure there's a window open.
 

broadgage

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Nov 23, 2007
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Somerset UK
For indoor use, I would avoid volatile fuel such as gasoline/petrol.
Kerosene (paraffin in UK) Is safer.
Whilst butane is reasonably safe, it is very expensive if a large stock is to be kept.

I keep a large supply of parafin (often called kerosene in some places) This is safer to store and cheap. The same fuel may be used in pressure lanterns, wick lanterns, portable cookers, and space heaters.
I favour Tilley lamps, a popular UK brand of paraffin pressure lamp, others exist. All need preheating, usually with industrial alcohol.
 
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