Landing lights

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JFranco

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Sep 13, 2011
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Hello guys, I am posting a question here to see if it can be answered and hopefully I am posting in the right section. I build model airplanes and we are working on a HUGE scale airliner. No I got the task doing the lights system. My experience with electronics is what comes out of the box with instructions.

I am looking to get the same (or roughly) power you get from an iPhone LED flashlight app. Basicaly I want to iluminate at least 40 to 50 feet without the intention of blinding anyone. Where can I go to start learning how to do this, is there a book I should read or is working with LED emitters just hook up to the batery and switch? I'd love to hear your responses and thanks for the opportunity to post!

Franco
 

deadrx7conv

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May 5, 2010
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USA
A 1 watt LED should work. You'll need a driver for the battery pack that you choose and a way to mount/heatsink the LED.
You're basically building a flashlight without the flashlight body, and mounting it for your application.

Are you going to be flying it at night?

How much room do you have? how much battery power is available?
 

idleprocess

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Feb 29, 2004
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Here's a basic guide on "hooking up LED's".

If you have a simple understanding of Ohm's law, you can build basic DC circuits with LED's using resistors to limit current.

Or, as the previous poster has suggested, you can use a driver (a pre-packaged constant-current circuit) to eliminate the need for resistors. This method is simpler for the hobbyist and generally more versatile, but more expensive.
 
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JFranco

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Sep 13, 2011
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Not too much space, i have not thought about anything for power yet but I would like it to come from one of the lipos inside the plane, rechargeable. What are your thoughts on that?
 

JFranco

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
4
Here's a basic guide on "hooking up LED's".

If you have a simple understanding of Ohm's law, you can build basic DC circuits with LED's using resistors to limit current.

Or, as the previous poster has suggested, you can use a driver (a pre-packaged constant-current circuit) to eliminate the need for resistors. This method is simpler for the hobbyist and generally more versatile, but more expensive.

Thanks for that hookup guide!!!! It helps a lot!
 
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